Friday, April 29, 2016

On the Trail of Mesoamerican Jade: an Archaeologist in Training

February 8, 2016.
Katje Lattik, of Worlds Revealed: Geography & Maps at the Library of Congress Blog, has written an informative post about 3D imaging of carved jade artifacts, part of the Jay I Kislak Collection within the Library of Congress, which were created by the Mayan civilization.

"This process creates what are essentially highly detailed maps of the surfaces of these objects and it allows for greater insight into the subtle details of the carving process that could be missed by the naked eye. The reflectiveness of polished jade, the prevalence of pieces that are carved in the round, and the intricacies of the carving process can all hinder our ability to fully examine the jade of the Kislak collection, making them ideal for 3d imaging."

To read the full postclick here.

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Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Forest Reveal Lingering Effects of Native Cultures

Honey locust with pods.  Image Courtesy of Robert J. Warren II and ScienceDaily.
Honey locust with pods.
Image Courtesy of Robert J. Warren II and ScienceDaily.
March 16, 2016.
SUNY Buffalo State, of Science Daily, wrote an exploratory article about the recent research of Robert J. Warren who argues that the distribution of Honey Locust trees (Gleditsia triacanthos) throughout the southern Appalachian Mountain region in the United States can best be explained by ancient cultivation practices of the Cherokee.

"He points out that the Cherokee had reason to cultivate the honey locust as a source of sugar, and as wood for game sticks and weapons. The tree also had spiritual significance. He conducted extensive searches for honey locust trees and then used sources including military maps, historical accounts, archeological research, and historical markers to identify Cherokee settlement sites. He verified the information with sources including the Eastern Band of the Cherokee Nation (EBCI) Tribal Historic Preservation Office. His results strongly suggest that G. triacanthos distribution in the Southern Appalachian region are more strongly patterned by Native American settlements than by niche requirements or alternative methods of seed dispersal."

To read the full articleclick here.

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Monday, April 25, 2016

Ojibwe Cosmos: Mercury in Retrograde, Earthly Stardust and Intricate Stellar Maps

April 2, 2016.
Konnie Lemay, of Indian Country Today, has written a thoughtful article about recent efforts to teach Anishinaabe star knowledge; which has the fortunate effect of debunking myths about American Indian nations.

"Long before Europeans brought over their Greek monikers for the constellations, Native cultures already had named their sky people. And those faraway relatives helped them to understand their world and how to survive in it.

For the Ojibwe, the constellations of Mooz (Moose), Biboonikeonini (Wintermaker), Mishi Bizhiw (the Great Panther) and Nanaboujou (the original man of Anishinaabe narratives), heralded the arrival of fall, winter, spring and summer."

To read the full articleclick here.

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Friday, April 22, 2016

First Day of Spring Marked with Sun Daggers, Light Snakes

At equinox, a blazing serpent of light (left) appears to slither down the side of El Castillo pyramid,  at the Mayan site of  Chichén Itzá. Image Courtesy of Israel Leal and National Geographic.
At equinox, a blazing serpent of light (left) appears to slither down the side of El Castillo pyramid,
at the Mayan site of  Chichén Itzá. Image Courtesy of Israel Leal and National Geographic.
March 17, 2016.
Nadia Drake, of National Geographic, has written an illuminating article about astronomical alignments, like the spring equinox, which have been incorporated and celebrated by various cultures in their lasting monuments.

"But sometimes, simply marking astronomical alignments isn’t enough; another ancient method of tracing the sun’s meanderings through the sky involves using light and shadow to paint particular images. Here, the sunlight itself does the work, inscribing illuminated shapes or casting shadows. One example of this is at Chichén Itzá, where the Mayans crafted a sculpture that transforms itself into a blazing serpent at equinox, representing their deity Kukulcan. 

Another image in light was discovered in 1977, when rock artist Anna Sofaer was exploring the petroglyphs of the American southwest. There, at the top of New Mexico’s Fajada Butte, Sofaer found what’s known as the Sun Dagger, a calendrical marking created from two spirals etched into the rock. During summer solstice and equinox, the spirals are sliced by a dagger of light as the sun shines through slabs of rock; at winter solstice, two daggers appear on either side of the spiral—or did. The rock slabs have shifted and the images no longer appear."

To read the full articleclick here.

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Wednesday, April 20, 2016

Ohio History Connection's New American Indian Liason

Stacy Halfmoon, the new director of American Indian Relations  at the Ohio History Connection. Image Courtesy of Columbus Monthly.
Stacy Halfmoon, the new director of American Indian Relations
at the Ohio History Connection.
Image Courtesy of Columbus Monthly.
April 2016.
Debbie Briner, of Columbus Monthly, has written an informative article about the Ohio History Connection's new director of American Indian Relations, Stacy Halfmoon, and the Ohio History Connection's recent efforts to connect with the historic nations of Ohio.

"[Stacy] Halfmoon began her new duties in November as the first director of American Indian relations at the Ohio History Connection (the former Ohio Historical Society), which operates the Ohio History Center in North Columbus. “The American Indian history and the American Indian heritage in Ohio is tremendous,” she says.
History Connection CEO Burt Logan says Halfmoon’s hiring builds on his nonprofit’s efforts to educate about the history, archeology, culture and artifacts of Native American tribes who once inhabited the state. “If we look at it morally, it just feels like it’s the right thing to do,” Logan says. “Ohio was home to many Native American tribes prior to white Europeans migrating to the Midwest and forcing their removal. We really have significant parts of their heritage and their culture.”
Of his organization’s 57 historic sites, Logan says about 20 have some relationship with that period of European settlement. Halfmoon cites the nationally recognized prehistoric Newark Earthworks and the Serpent Mound in Adams County as examples of the significant presence of ancient Native American cultures in Ohio. “I am very respectful of the history,” Logan says."

To read the full articleclick here.

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Friday, April 15, 2016

Support the Newark Earthworks Center

Newark Earthworks 2005 Moonrise.  Image Courtesy of Timothy E. Black.
Newark Earthworks 2005 Moonrise.
Image Courtesy of Timothy E. Black.
____________________________________________________________

Help Keep the NEC Open
____________________________________________________________

As it stands, our budget and staffing are being reduced 
and our funding ends June 2017; 
so we need your help!

Our Mission
  • Enrich undergraduate education through classes, lectures, and internships, 
  • Enrich K-12 education through our school tours of ancient sites and summer day camps,
  • Foster research of Ohio and the Great Lakes region's American Indian cultures,
  • Reach out to descendant American Indian Nations removed from Ohio and to the international community.
If You Would Like to Monetarily Support Us
We Would Welcome Your Donations
Post on Social Media 
About The Newark Earthworks Center's Impact on You!
    ____________________________________________________________
      Thank you for your support and well wishes!
       We hope to continue our work 
      as long as possible.
      ____________________________________________________________

      Thursday, April 14, 2016

      We Hope to See You at the Upcoming Octagon Open Houses!

      April 17-18, 2016 Octagon Open House Flyer, PDF.
      PDF available.
      The grounds of the Octagon State Memorial is open to the public
      for general strolling and viewing from sunrise to sunset. The Newark Earthworks Center will be providing guided tours and other activities on April 17.

      Group tours of the Octagon State Memorial for April 18 can be schedules by calling Dr. Richard Shiels at (740) 366-9249. Group tours of the Great Circle Earthworks can be scheduled anytime by calling Ms. Amista Jackson at (740) 345-8224.

      125 N. 33rd Street
      Newark, OH 43055

      The next chance to tour the grounds of this enclosure
      isn't until May 31st!


      Information for self-guided tours can be found
      on the Ancient Ohio Trail's Newark Earthworks pagehere.​

      The Great Circle Museum will be open Noon 4 PM 
      on Sunday, April 17.

      455 Hebron Road
      Heath, Ohio 43056

      For more information, email us at earthworks@osu.edu or call us at (740) 364-9584 .

      The Newark Earthworks' Octagon
      Video Courtesy of the Ancient Ohio Trail and CERHAS.

      This earthwork is part of the Hopewell Ceremonial Earthworks;
      nine Ohio ancient earthworks sites constructed by the Ohio Hopewell culture during
       the Woodland Period (1-1000 CE) which are in the process of nomination for
       UNESCO World Heritage!

      For more information,
      Visit:

      Tuesday, April 12, 2016

      Strong Women/Strong Nations: Native American Women & Leadership

      Strong Women/Strong Nations| Native American Women & Leadership Program PDF. Courtesy of the National Museum of the American Indian.
      Strong Women/Strong Nations| Native American Women & Leadership Program PDF.
      Courtesy of the National Museum of the American Indian.
      March 18, 2016.
      " “Every step I take forward is on a path paved by strong Indian women before me,” CHEROKEE CHIEF WILMA MANKILLER once pointed out while explaining the importance of having women in active leadership roles to “restore balance and wholeness to our communities.” Indigenous women had long held social, spiritual, economic, and political power in their societies. Overcoming the great historical ruptures of colonialism, indigenous women are reconnecting with leadership traditions and empowering themselves to help create a stronger, healthier, and more prosperous world for all. Join us at this special symposium for a historical perspective on the complex identities of Native women and lively, insightful discussion by elected tribal leaders, activists, artists, and business leaders about the challenges, obstacles, and opportunities confronting women today"

      • National Museum of the American Indian Youtube -Strong Women/Strong Nations
        • Opening Song & Introduction
        • Naynaabeak’s Fishing Net: Illuminating the History of American Indian Women -Brenda Child
        • Finding Balance  -Honorable Jody Wilson-Raybould
        • A Conversation with Playwright, Musician, Poet, and Artist -Joy Harjo
        • Trail Blazers and Sovereignty Protectorys
        • The Emergence of Women as Leaders in Tribal Governance -Deborah Parker
        • Rebellion at the Roots: Reflections on the Last Twenty Years of Indigenous Women's Organizing in Mexico -Maylei Blackwell
        • Forging New Ground and Giving Back, Business Leadership
        • Closing Remarks
      For more information,
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