Tuesday, September 30, 2014

US Department of the Interior Bureau of Indian Affairs & Bureau of Indian Education

US Department of The Interior Bureau of Indian Affairs.

Bureau of Indian Education.

"the oldest bureau of the United States Department of the Interior. Established in 1824, IA currently provides services (directly or through contracts, grants, or compacts) to approximately 1.9 million American Indians and Alaska Natives. There are 566 federally recognized American Indian tribes and Alaska Natives in the United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) is responsible for the administration and management of 55 million surface acres and 57 million acres of subsurface minerals estates held in trust by the United States for American Indian, Indian tribes, and Alaska Natives. Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) provides education services to approximately 42,000 Indian students. BIA and BIE’s missions are:

The Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) mission is to:
"… enhance the quality of life, to promote economic opportunity, and to carry out the responsibility to protect and improve the trust assets of American Indians, Indian tribes, and Alaska Natives."

The Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) mission is to:
"… provide quality education opportunities from early childhood through life in accordance with the tribes’ needs to cultural and economic well being in keeping with the wide diversity of Indian tribes and Alaska Native villages as distinct cultural and governmental entities. The Bureau considers the whole person (spiritual, mental, physical and cultural aspects.)" "
How Do I...
Frequently Asked Questions
For Parents and Students
Document Library
  • Guide to Tracing Your American Indian Ancestry
  • Tribal Leaders Directory
  • FR Notice- Indian Entities Recognized and Eligible to Receive Services from the US BIA
  • FR Notice- Indian Child Welfare Act; Designated Tribal Agents for the Service of Notice
  • Certificate of Degree of Indian or Alaska Native Blood Application and Instructions
  • American Indian Population and Labor Force Reports
  • Scholarships and Grants

Monday, September 29, 2014

Indian Yet Not 'An' Indian

June 26, 2014.
Chelsey Luger, of Indian Country Today, has written an interesting article about nuances in language which help describe varying degrees of respect.

"What’s the difference, and why does it matter?

It’s a subtlety in language that has the power to evoke varying degrees of respect. The indefinite article (a or an) should of course be used freely when referring to objects - like a candy bar,a book, or an orangutan. But it shouldn’t be used in front of an ethnicity, because it creates a demeaning connotation."

To read the full article, click here.

Friday, September 26, 2014

Traditional Archery Techniques & Ohio's Past

Video is Courtesy of the National Museum of the American Indian.
September 2, 2014.
Keevin Lewis, of the National Museum of the American Indian Blog, has written an interesting post about a recent workshop and demonstration about traditional bow and arrow construction in Arizona.

"The National Museum of the American Indian supported Royce’s project—his research into bows and arrows and other objects in the museum’s collections outside Washington, D.C., the workshop, and the reception—through the Artist Leadership Program."

To read the full post, click here.

August 3, 2013.
Much of Ohio's bow and arrow tradition is not archaeologically documented; because wood does not preserve well. Dr. Brad Lepper, of the Ohio History Connection's Archaeology Blog, has written an informative post about his research into the link between social complexity and archery with Ohio's ancient cultures.

"Ultimately, perhaps inevitably, the upward (or downward depending on your point of view) spiral of agricultural intensification and militarization – initiated by the adoption of the bow — resulted in the rise of centralized authority during the Mississippian period. And although there were no Mississippian temple mound centers in Ohio, Rob Cook’s research at SunWatchVillage in Dayton suggests it might only have been a matter of time before that level of socio-cultural complexity developed here, too. "

To read the full post, click here.

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Thursday, September 25, 2014

Stonehenge Researchers Discover Site is Much Larger Than Previously Thought

Video Courtesy of the University of Birmingham.

The location of newly discovered monuments around Stonehenge.  Image Courtesy of Geert Verhoeven, University of Bi/PA and The Guardian.com.
The location of newly discovered monuments around Stonehenge.
Image Courtesy of Geert Verhoeven, University of Bi/PA and The Guardian.com.
September 9, 2014.
Ian Sample, of The Guardian, has written an interesting and very informative article about the recent discovery of a "series of hidden chapels, burial mounds, and ritual shrines" in the area surronding Stonehenge, an UNESCO World Heritage Site.

"Researchers uncovered 17 new chapels and hundreds of archaeological features around the neolithic standing stones on Salisbury Plain, Wiltshire, including forms of monuments that have never been seen before.
Brought together for the first time in a digital map of the historic site, the discoveries transform how archaeologists view a landscape that was reshaped by generations for hundreds of years after the first stones were erected around 3100BC."

To read the full article, click here.

For more information,
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Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Autumn 2014 Newark Earthworks Center Events

Newark Earthworks Octagon.
Newark Earthworks, Octagon.
Autumn Semester: My Dream Show Exhibit by Candi Wesaw


Candi Wesaw is from Hartford, Michigan and a citizen of the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indian Nation. She has is deeply connected to her culture, heritage, and the arts. Ms. Wesaw works in multiple mediums and formats, including illustration, textiles, photography, and traditional native arts. She has also illustrated a series of children’s books about the Potawatomi, and is motivated
 to share her talent with youngsters to promote mutual cultural understandings. 

For more information about artist Candi Wesaw, click here.
Examples of her work can be found, here.

Newark, OH 43055

September 30, 2014: Lecture Series: The Newark Earthworks
and World Heritage

Lecture Series: The Newark Earthworks and World Heritage 2014 Flyer

Dr. Brad Lepper, of Ohio History Connection, will be giving a lecture about 
Why the Newark Earthworks Qualify for World Heritage: Universal Human Value.

Classroom 175, Warner Library
1219 University Drive
Newark, OH 43055

For more information, contact us at earthworks@osu.edu 
or at 740-364-9584.

October 7, 2014: Lecture Series: The Newark Earthworks 
and World Heritage

Lecture Series: The Newark Earthworks and World Heritage 2014 Flyer

Dr. Jarrod Burks, of Ohio Valley Archaeology, will be giving a lecture about 
Going High Tech to Study the Newark Earthworks: Putting Remote Sensing Tools to Work.

Classroom 175, Warner Library
1219 University Drive
Newark, OH 43055

For more information, contact us at earthworks@osu.edu 
or at 740-364-9584.

October 12, 2014: Octagon Open House
Octagon Open House Flyer October 2014

The grounds of the Octagon State Memorial will be open to the public
 for general strolling and viewing from sunrise to sunset.
Guided tours will be provided by the Newark Earthworks Center 
from 1-4 PM.
Special Guests Include:
 Candi Wesaw and other citizens of the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indian Nation.
Octagon State Memorial
125 N. 33rd St.
Newark OH 43055
For more information, contact us at earthworks@osu.edu .
If you would like to book a group tour, please call 740-364-9584.


October 12, 2014: Reception for My Dream Show 

by Candi Wesaw
7 PM.
Admissions is free and open to the public.
The art exhibit runs from August 27th through December 8th, 2014.

Candi Wesaw is from Hartford, Michigan and a citizen 
of the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indian Nation.
Wesaw is deeply connected to her culture, heritage, and the arts. 

She works in multiple mediums and formats; 
including illustrations, textiles, photography, 
and traditional native arts.


Newark, OH 43055

Refreshments will be served.

This event is graciously sponsored by: The Newark Earthworks Center- The Ohio State University at NewarkThe Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indian NationThe American Indian Studies Program at The Ohio State UniversityThe Ohio History ConnectionThe Cultural Arts & Events Committee- The Ohio State University at Newark.

For more information, contact Dr. John Low, JD, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, 
Department of Comparative Studies at low.89@osu.edu 

Tours of the Great Circle Earthworks and Flint Ridge.
The Newark Earthworks Center employs four trained tour guides (two certified teachers & two Native Americans) who give tours for K-12 classes & other groups.
Admission is $5 per person except for teachers & aids.
Approximately 2, 500 school children participate each year.
For more information visit our Ancient Ohio Experience page or email us.
 Call 740-345-8224 to schedule a tour.

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Fourth World Journal

Fourth World Journal. Published by the Center for World Indigenous Studies. Image Courtesy of the Center for World Indigenous Studies.
Image Courtesy of the Center for World Indigenous Studies.
"the world's leading publication for ideas and analysis about and by writers from some of the world's more than six thousand Fourth World nations. Leading activists and scholars contribute lively and informative articles and essays and reveal what otherwise often remains hidden."


Articles Include:
Winter 2014 Vol. 12, No. 2.
  • UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
Spring 2013 Vol. 12, No. 1
  • Barriers to Fair and Effective Congressional Representation in Indian Country
    • Dina Gilio-Whitaker
Autumn 2012 Vol. 11, No. 2.
  • Traditional Storytelling in the Digital Era
    • Janelle Palacios, Ph.D.; CNM
  • Increasing the Knowledge Base: Utilizing the GAIN in Culturally Sensitive Landscapes
    • Rodney C. Haring, Ph.D.; Janet Titus, Ph.D.; LaVerne H. Stevens, Ph.D.; Barbara D. Estrada, MS
  • Facilitating the Success of Native Investigators in Research Careers
    • Teshia G. Arambula Solomon, Ph.D.
Summer 2012 Vol. 11, No. 1.
  • Emptying the Cup: Healing Fragmented Identity- An Anishinawbekwe Perspective on Historical Trauma and Culturally Appropriate Consultation
    • S. Amy Desjarlais, MA
Summer 2011 Vol. 10, No. 1.
  • Expressions of Native Resiliency
    • Jennifer L. Penland, Ph.D.
  • US Consultation Policy
    • Rudolph C. Rÿser, Ph.D.

    Winter 2011 Vol. 10, No. 2.
    • Digitizing Worldviews Intangible Cultural Heritages
      • T. Anantha Vijayaah, Ph.D.
    • Participation in the WIPO Intergovernmental Committee on Intellectual Property, Genetic Resources, Traditional Knowledge, and Folklore
      • Grand Council of the Crees (Eeyou Istchee)
    Winter 2010 Vol. 9, No. 2.
    • Comments and Recommendations on the United States Review of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
      •  Rudolph C. Rÿser, Ph.D.
     August 1999 Vol. 4, No. 1.
    • Living Anishnabe
      • Allen Gabriel
    • Long-Term Strategies for Institutional Change in University and Colleges: Negotiating Native Peoples' Middle Ground
      • Rodney Bobiwash

    Monday, September 22, 2014

    President Obama Visits Stonehenge

    September, 2014.
    The Telegraph and The Guardian have both written interesting articles about President Obama's recent visit to Stonehenge, an UNESCO World Heritage site
    Each article has unique informative features.

    "[President Obama]described the atmosphere around the stones as 'really special' and his visit to Stonehenge as 'a highlight of my tour'."



    -The Guardian.

    For more information,
    Visit:

    Friday, September 19, 2014

    The Treaty of Greene Ville

    Treaty of Greenville, 1795. Image Courtesy of Ohio History Central.
    Treaty of Greenville, 1795.
    Image Courtesy of Ohio History Central.
    The Greenville Treaty Line established new western boundaries for the United States in 1797 and established peace between the United States of American and the tribal nations of the "Wyandots, Delawares, Shawanees, Ottawas, Chippewas, Pattawatimas, Miamis, Eel Rivers, Weas, Kickapoos, Piankeshaws, and Kaskaskias" following the Battle of Fallen Timbers.
    Fort Recovery State Museum will be hosting a dedication ceremony "where a sycamore tree might have stood more than 200 years ago" and was a "starting point for laying out the Greenville Treaty Line". The public is invited to this memorable event

    Sunday, September 28th, 2014.
    1 PM.
    Fort Loramie, OH 45845

    Concluding at Gigandet Farm

    Speakers Include:
    • Ken Sowards 
      • on the impact the treaty had on the United States
    • Dr. Steven Littleton 
      • on Native American History before the treaty
    • Greg Shipley 
      • on the archaeological discoveries on the Fleckenstein Farm
    • James Williams 
      • on the surveyor Israel Ludlow
    Line of Treaty within the Western Reserve.  Image Courtesy of The West Virginia Encyclopedia.
    Line of Treaty within the Western Reserve.
    Image Courtesy of The West Virginia Encyclopedia.
    For more information,
    Visit:




    Thursday, September 18, 2014

    Stonehenge 'Complete Circle' Evidence Found

    Stonehenge with parch marks during July 2013.  Image Courtesy of English Heritage and BBC News.
    Stonehenge with parch marks during July 2013.
    Image Courtesy of English Heritage and BBC News.
    August 30, 2014.
    BBC News has written about recently discovered parch marks at Stonehenge, an UNESCO World Heritage Site. These parch marks seen during last July suggest the stone circle was once complete which is a new discovery for the site.

    "Tim Daw, who spotted the parch marks, said: "I was standing on the public path looking at the grass near the stones and thinking that we needed to find a longer hosepipe to get the parched patches to green up... A sudden lightbulb moment in my head, and I remembered that the marks were where archaeologists had looked without success for signs that there had been stone holes, and that parch marks can signify them." "

    To read the full article, click here.

    For more information,
    Visit:

    Wednesday, September 17, 2014

    Be it resolved by the House of Representatives of the State of Ohio...


    June 2014.

    "Be it resolved by the House of Representatives of the State of Ohio (The Senate concurring):

    WHEREAS, American Indians have made and continue to make significant contributions towards shaping Ohio into the great state that it is today. The ancient cultures built monumental earthworks in Ohio encoded with astronomical alignments that have captured the world's attention, and many of Ohio's geographic features and cities have historic Native American Indian names; and

    WHEREAS, American Indians who have contributed to the rich history and culture of our state include the members of the ancient cultures now known as the Adena, Hopewell, and Fort Ancient, and historic tribes that include the Shawnee, Miami, Delaware, Potawatomi, Seneca, Wyandot, Peoria, and Ottawa; and

    WHEREAS, American Indians have made an indelible mark on the landscape, history, and culture of Ohio. Today, many American Indians call Ohio "home," working and raising their families here; and

    WHEREAS, American Indians living in Ohio can be justifiably proud of their rich heritage, spirituality, and traditions. It is important that they receive encouragement from the state's elected officials to continue teaching their culture to their children and sharing it with their fellow Ohioans; now therefore be it

    RESOLVED, That we, the members of the 130th General Assembly of the State of Ohio, designate the fourth week of September as "American Indian Week," in conjunction with "American Indian Day" on the fourth Saturday of September, to honor the significant influence that American Indians have had on Ohio and to encourage the teaching and sharing of their culture; and be it further

    RESOLVED, That the Clerk of the House of Representatives transmit duly authenticated copies of this resolution to the news media of Ohio."


    For more information, 
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