Friday, December 19, 2014

Bladelets, Flint Ridge Flint, & the Hopewell Interaction Sphere

Flint Ridge flint bladelets and cores from the Dobson Village site - a flintknapping workshop near Flint Ridge. Image Courtesy of the Ohio History Connection Archaeology Blog.
Flint Ridge flint bladelets and cores from the Dobson Village site
- a flintknapping workshop near Flint Ridge.
Image Courtesy of the Ohio History Connection Archaeology Blog.
December 7, 2014.
Brad Lepper, of the Ohio History Connection Archaeology Blog, has written an informative post about recent research into the Hopewell culture's use of Flint Ridge flint.

"Ohio State University archaeologist Richard Yerkes found that bladelets were used for an even greater variety of tasks, including cutting hide or meat, scraping hides, working bone or antler, wood working, cutting plants, and incising stone. At the LIC-79 sites, located near the Newark Earthworks, meat and hide cutting was the principal activity whereas at the Marietta Earthworks, bone and antler working predominated."

To read the full post, click here.

For more information,
Visit:

Thursday, December 18, 2014

Hopewell Happenings 2014

Hopewell Culture National Historical Park
Hopewell Culture National Historical Park.
This year's Hopewell Happenings, the Hopewell National Historical Park's annual newsletter, has a multitude of articles which pertain to Native sites in Ohio. 
  • Prehistoric Paddle with a Ranger
  • World Heritage UpdateL The Hopewell Ceremonial Earthworks Nomination
  • Park hosts MAC Field Trip to Chillicothe & Newark
  • New Discoveries at the North Forty Site
  • The Living Earthwork
  • Ohio National Historic Sites
  • Six Important Archaeological Sites...One National Park
  • To Future Archaeologists (kids only)
  • Mound City Group Area & Trail Map
  • Seip Earthworks
  • Hopewell Mound Group
  • Junior Ranger Coloring & Activities

For more information,
Visit:

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Late Woodland to Mississippian Transition in Illinois Due to Internal Culture Change Not Migration

December 2, 2014.
Brad Lepper, of the Ohio History Connection Archaeology Blog, has written an informative post about a recent paper discussing the transition of Late Woodland to Mississippian culture in Illinois.

"The transition from the Late Woodland (A.D. 400-1050) to the Mississippian (A.D. 1050-1500) period is one of the most significant cultural transformations in eastern North American prehistory. Jennifer Raff, a research fellow in Anthropology at the University of Texas at Austin and co-author of a new study of ancient DNA spanning this transition, notes that “it involved changes to social and political structure, the adoption of intensive maize agriculture, changes to mortuary practices and the development of new art, technologies and religious practices.” "

To read the full article, click here.


For more information,
Visit:

Tuesday, December 16, 2014

Just in Case You've Missed Them...

Check back regularly for updates; 
we regularly post new events, classes, and links.

This connects to our blog's homepage. 
All of our posts can be found here;
 but only the last 10 posts will be on the front page.

A direct link to The Ancient Ohio Trail's page of information about the Newark Earthworks.  It contains detailed information about the various parts of the earthworks  (the Great Circle, the Octagon, the Square, the Burial Ellipse, etc.), the site's astronomical alignments, modern history, and so much more.





Our school tours page. 
We not only list the content standards we conform to;
 but opportunities for field trips, classroom outreach, 
and all of our summer camp information. 

Our calendar details the events of the Ohio State University 
and the Newark Earthworks Center promoting 
research and outreach for Native history and cultures. 
Below our interactive Google Calendar are contact details 
for student clubs, special classes, and more detailed event information.






This link contain explanations for some of our frequently asked questions
 along with links pertaining to trusted sources of additional information.
 If you have suggestions for other questions, please contact us at earthworks@osu.edu.


Our goals, objectives, and contact information can all be found here.

Arranged by semester and campus, this page has a roughly alphabetical list of some suggested courses Ohio State University students can take to expand their knowledge of Native peoples,
 both present and past.

Outside Resources
Home
This connects to our blog's homepage. 
All of our posts can be found here;
 but only the last 10 posts will be on the front page.

The Ancient Ohio Trail - Newark EarthworksNewark Earthworks
A direct link to The Ancient Ohio Trail's page of information about the Newark Earthworks.  It contains detailed information about the various parts of the earthworks  (the Great Circle, the Octagon, the Square, the Burial Ellipse, etc.), the site's astronomical alignments, modern history, and so much more.





This is intended as a location for events within the Midwest which demonstrate knowledge about Native culture,earthworks, archaeology, and more. Below the interactive Google Calendar are individual event flyers, as applicable, followed by exhibits in the Midwest 
with a focus of Native culture.

Just like every Tuesday a post is created detailing an archive source for undergraduate research; this page is intended to give a link list of blogs, centers, committees, institutes, societies, historical sources, informative links, museums & historic sites, news sites, and Ohio tourism sites which can be utilized in the process of undergraduate research.

An attempt to find credible videos for Midwest Native and earthworks history worldwide. This is by no means a comprehensive list and links may be subject to change. As time passes, information is updated and so described conclusions may no longer be valid. Links are listed to the website from which the video can be found. If the video is part of a large and varied content base, 
a direct link might be provided.

If you have any comments or suggestions,
We would love to hear from you!

Please contact us at earthworks@osu.edu, 
or call us at 740-364-9584.

Monday, December 15, 2014

Wisconsin's Mound Builders

November, 23, 2014.
Wisconsin Public Radio, NPR, has a new episode of University of the Air about Wisconsin's ancient peoples and the mounds they built.

"For hundreds of years, Wisconsin was the center of a thriving culture of effigy mound builders, but what was the significance of those earthen structures and what kind of life did the builders have? In the hour to come, Historical Society archaeologist Amy Rosebrough will guide us through some of Wisconsin’s mounds and go through some of the recent discoveries about them. We’ll also get some ideas to the connections between the Wisconsin cultures and their trading partners in other parts of the country. "

To listen to the entire program, click here.

For more information,
Visit:

Friday, December 12, 2014

UMass Amherst Anthropologist Receives Mellon Fellowship Award to Study Endangered Language and Native American Traditions

November 6, 2014.
Jared Sharpe, of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, has written a brief article about Sonya Atalay's new "major fellowship award to master the endangered Anishinaabemowin language of Native American Ojibwe tribal communities, in order to expand research and understanding of ancient tribal knowledge and practices that are under an increasing threat of becoming lost forever".

"Anishinaabe language and traditional knowledge contain complex and nuanced ways of understanding the natural world all around us with this grant I’m attempting to gather and braid together strands of knowledge that are often separated and studied independently in universities. I’m drawing connections between earthworks, archaeological mounds and ancient rock art to reclaim teachings that our ancestors left written on the land, saw in waterways and recognized through traditional star knowledge. The Mellon Foundation’s New Directions Fellowship will allow me to use digital technologies to connect traditional tribal knowledge with sophisticated geographic information system (GIS) mapping to learn how people of the Great Lakes engaged with the landscape and natural environment thousands of years ago. This can help us understand our contemporary world, even provide solutions for navigating some of our most pressing global concerns.”

To read the full article, click here.

For more information,
Visit:

Thursday, December 11, 2014

Reservoir Could Threaten Great Mound

Image Courtesy of John P. Cleary and The Herald Bulletin.

November 14, 2014.
Ken de la Bastide, of The Herald Bulletin, has written a short article about the possible damage the proposed Mounds Lake reservoir could do to historic sites within Mounds State Park, Indiana.

"The Anderson Mounds are listed in the National Register and represent one of the best preserved earthwork sites in Indiana, the council said in a statement. This site was a place of ceremonial and ritual significance to the Native American builders. The site contains burials from that era, and it is of immeasurable importance to recognizing the cultural heritage of central Indiana.

There are many other archaeological sites, both known and yet to be discovered, within the lake footprint including many of Native American habitations and burial sites, Delaware villages, the Moravian mission site..."

To read the full article, click here.

For more information,
Visit:

Tuesday, December 9, 2014

Creative Learning Factory

Creative Learning Factory

"...facilitates exceptional distance learning and professional development programming across a wide variety of subjects. Through customized hands-on, minds-on experiences, participants learn in a fun, highly interactive way, while professional participants leave ready to train, improve, enlighten, and inspire within their own organizations"

Mound Building Cultures Promotional Video
from OHS Distance Learning on Vimeo.
  • Webinars & Workshops
    • Museum Educator Series Webinars
    • Workshops
    • Custom Professional Development
    • Educator Webinars
  • Distance Learning
  • Ask Dr. Betsy Podcasts
    • What is a Primary Source?
    • What is the Difference Between a Primary and a Secondary Source?
    • Music as a Primary Source
    • Translations as Primary Sources
    • Propaganda: The Only Source You'll Ever Need
    • Literature as a Primary Source
    • Architecture and Landscape as Primary Sources
    • Artwork as a Primary Source
    • Does it Have to be Old?
    • Newspapers as Primary Sources
    • Finding and Evaluating Primary Sources on the Web
    • What Do Archaeologists Do?
  • Previous Webinars
    • Textbook Tuesday: Cooperation and Conflict in Early Ohio
    • Determining Text Complexity in Primary Sources
    • Textbook Tuesdays: Helping Students Organize Information
    • Textbook Tuesdays: Maps and Geographic Literacy
    • Northwest Ordinance (Founding of America Documents Program)
    • Textbook Tuesdays: Creating ans Using Timelines with Students
    • Textbook Tuesdays: Using Primary Sources to Create Historical Narratives
    • The Myaamia Experience and the War of 1812
    • Revised Academic Content Standards Series: Geography Strand
    • Revised Academic Content Standards Series: History Strand
    • Using Traveling Trunks for Educational Programming
    • Incorporating Historic Interpretation



Friday, December 5, 2014

New Light on Pre-Columbian Village

Town Creek Indian Mound site is today a grassy mound with re-created buildings and a stockade. The mound was built, one basketful of earth at a time, sometime around AD 1250 by people whose name for themselves is lost to time. Image Courtesy of William Russ — N.C. Tourism & newsobserver.com .
Town Creek Indian Mound site is today a grassy mound with re-created buildings and a stockade. The mound was built, one basketful of earth at a time, sometime around AD 1250 by people whose name for themselves is lost to time.
Image Courtesy of William Russ — N.C. Tourism & newsobserver.com .
November 16, 2014.
Amber Veverka, of newsobserver.com, has written an informative article about a recent archaeological excavation near Town Creek Indian Mound, a North Carolinian village site which was built sometime around AD 1250.

"What Boudreaux discovered is that the land at Town Creek State Historic Site has been occupied, on and off, since the Ice Age, and that for a long time, the site wasn’t a set-apart, sacred center – it was a busy, thriving community. Boudreaux’s mapping of the soil stains shows too many buildings for the site to have been mostly vacant. And items like the charred corncob show the site was full of everyday life."

To read the full article, click here.

For more information,
Visit:



Thursday, December 4, 2014

October Octagon Open House 2014

Newark Earthworks Celebrated. The Ohio State University at Newark.


Dr. Shiels, Director of the Newark Earthworks Center,  giving a tour at the October 2014 Octagon Open House. Image Courtesy of the Ohio State University Newark.
Dr. Shiels, Director of the Newark Earthworks Center,
giving a tour at the October 2014 Octagon Open House.
Image Courtesy of the Ohio State University Newark.


Special guests of the Octagon Open House included eighteen elders from the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indian Nation who traveled to Newark from southwest Michigan and northwest Indiana to attend the Open House and an artist's reception for Candi Wesaw. Her exhibit My Dream Show is currently being exhibited in the LeFevre Art Gallery through December 8th.
Entering the Circle connected to the Octagon, October 12, 2014.
Image Courtesy of the Ohio State University Newark.







The Octagon State Memorial is fully open to the public four days a year. The rest of the year, you can view the site from the public path curving around the side of the Octagon and the viewing tower next to the informational sign near to the parking lot.






More photos can be found on our website, here.

For more information,
Visit: