Monday, February 8, 2016

Effigy Mounds Bill Won't Likely Get Vote, Says Vos

Ho-Chunk Nation Tribal Chief Clayton Winneshiek, shown speaking  at the  "Save the Mounds" rally, January 12, 2016.  Image Courtesy of Wisconsin Public Radio (WPR).
Ho-Chunk Nation Tribal Chief Clayton Winneshiek, shown speaking  at the
 "Save the Mounds" rally, January 12, 2016.
 Image Courtesy of Wisconsin Public Radio (WPR).
January 12, 2016.
Parth Shah, of Wisconsin Public Radio, has written a brief article about the probable stalling of Wisconsin's proposed Assembly Bill 620; which would potentially allow property owners to excavate effigy mounds on their property.

"Ho-Chunk nation tribal Chief Clayton Winneshiek said that he sees Vos's statement as a small victory, although he thinks the bill will eventually "be brought back in a different manner." He stressed that the state's tribes are prepared to take on the state government again if the bill is reintroduced."

To read the full articleclick here.

For more information,
Visit:

Thursday, February 4, 2016

Meet Native America: Ken St. Marks, Chairman of the Chippewa Cree Tribe of the Rocky Boy's Indian Reservation

Meet Native American. The National Museum of the American Indian.

"In the interview series Meet Native America, the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian invites tribal leaders, cultural figures, and other interesting and accomplished Native individuals to introduce themselves and say a little about their lives and work. Together, their responses illustrate the diversity of the indigenous communities of the Western Hemisphere, as well as their shared concerns, and offer insights beyond what’s in the news to the ideas and experiences of Native peoples today." 
-Dennis Zotigh, NMAI 

Chairman Ken St. Marks, Chippewa Cree Tribe of the Rocky Boy's Indian Reservation.
January 2016. Image Courtesy of The National Museum of the American Indian.

"Where is your tribal community located? 

Rocky Boy’s Indian Reservation is in north central Montana. 

Where is your tribe originally from? 

Rocky Boy’s Band of Chippewa came from the Great Lakes area, and Little Bear’s Band of Cree came from the Canadian territories. "

Tuesday, February 2, 2016

The Richard J. and Martha D. Denman Undergraduate Research Forum

Image courtesy of the Ohio State University.


Share your research project, academic scholarship, or creative activity with the Ohio State community by participating in the Denman Undergraduate Research Forum or the Spring Undergraduate Research Expo!
The Denman Forum & Spring Expo showcase the significant contributions of talented Ohio State undergraduates to scholarly activities conducted at OSU and around the world. The Forum and Expo promotes intellectual exchange between students, faculty, and the public. The Denman is a competitive, judged research forum that has been a proud Ohio State tradition for 20 years. 
Due to space limitations, the Denman Forum will be limited to 530 posters presentations."
The Undergraduate Research Office is calling for abstracts to be submitted to the 2016 Denman Forum & Spring Expo, which will be held on Wednesday, March 30th at the Recreation and Physical Activity Center (RPAC)
The Denman Forum will be conducted from 12:00-3:00 pm in the upper and lower RPAC gyms. 
The Spring Expo will take place from 9:30-11:00 am in the upper RPAC gym.
The Denman Forum is appropriate for undergraduates who: 
  1. are in the latter or final stages of a research or creative project,
  2. have at least preliminary results to report, and/or
  3. are ready to publicly present their research or creative project in a juried setting. 

The Spring Expo is appropriate for undergraduates who: 
  1. are in the early stages of a research or creative project, 
  2. do not yet have results or findings to report, 
  3. are ready to publicly present their research or creative project in a non-competitive setting, and/or 
  4. were redirected from participation at the Denman Forum.  


Abstracts can be submitted between 
Monday, December 28, 2015 and Thursday, February 4, 2016 at 5:00 pm

Read the 
Forum & Expo Submission Guidelines for more information
 on writing and submitting abstracts.

Students whose abstracts are accepted to the Forum and Expo are invited to present a research poster. Workshops are offered to help students prepare poster presentations; see the list of dates here.
For more information, 

Visit:

Thursday, January 28, 2016

How Far Did Hohokam Reach? Researcher Thinks They Dominated Southwest for Centuries

The Salado built the dwellings preserved by Tonto National Monument,  but at least one researcher believes they were part of a regional civilization dominated by the Hohokam.  Image Courtesy of  Payson Roundup.
The Salado built the dwellings preserved by Tonto National Monument,
but at least one researcher believes they were part of a regional civilization dominated by the Hohokam.
Image Courtesy of  Payson Roundup.
December 29, 2015.
Pete Aleshire, of Payson Roundup, has written an informative article about Dr. Steven Shackley's recent analysis of the sources of Hohokam culture linked obsidian. The Hohokam culture, from AD 200 - AD 1400, was an influential civilization based mostly along the Gila and Salt Rivers
 in present-day central and southern Arizona in the United States.

"The work gives added stature to the to Hohokam, whose importance has long been overshadowed by the much more durable and impressive ruins left by the Ancestral Puebloeans — previously referred to as the Anasazi. They built great cliff houses, with complexes of giant, round, half-buried, ceremonial kivas in places like Chaco Canyon and Mesa Verde.
The Hohokam built mostly adobe and earthen cities along rivers and extensive irrigation systems they built along those rivers — especially the Salt, Verde and Gila rivers, which converge in the Valley. In addition to the massive irrigation works, the Hohokam built great, raised, platform mound housing for their elites and not entirely understood “ball courts,” reminiscent of the structures of the Mayans and Aztecs."

To read the full articleclick here.

For more information,
Visit:

Wednesday, January 27, 2016

Summer Research Opportunities Program (SROP) at The Ohio State University

May 24, 2016 - July 30, 2016.
What is SROP?
The Summer Research Opportunities Program (SROP) at Ohio State is a summer research experience designed to help historically underrepresented undergraduates explore opportunities for graduate study. Participants work with a faculty mentor within their area of study and begin to develop a collegate-mentor relationship that is crucial to success in graduate school.

The program provides research experiences across the university to eligible students and allows for a meaningful, realistic assessment of their interest in graduate study. We promote and support the student/professor relationship that is so crucial to success in graduate school and beyond. The program offers a weekly professional development workshop and a culminating research conference where students present their work to members of the university community.

SROP Highlights
  • Students conduct original research under the supervision of a faculty mentor
  • 2 semester credits
  • Workshops on topics including research writing, financing, and applying to graduate school, presenting research, and GRE preparation
  • Work one-on-one with Graduate School staff to prepare graduate applications and identify potential sources for graduate funding
  • Oral and written presentations of research projects
  • Earn a $3000 stipend
  • Receive campus room and board

SROP Eligibility Requirements
  • Students must be at least one of the following: African-American, Native American, or Latino/Hispanic, First generation or low income students
  • Rising Junior or Senior
  • Citizen or a permanent resident of the U.S.
  • 3.0 or higher G.P.A.
  • Interest in pursuing a Ph.D. or terminal graduate degree

SROP Application Process
  • Applications available online at https://www.cic.net/students/srop/introduction beginning November 1, 2015.
  • Contact Ana'Brown or Jesse Goliath via email at gradrecruit@osu.edu to coordinate the application process.
  • The 2016 OSU SROP Experience is May 24, 2016- July 30, 2016.

Application Deadline
Applications must be submitted by Monday, February 8, 2016.
Supplemental materials will be accepted until March 1, 2016.
Questions and Comments? Email: gradrecruit@osu.edu .

Ohio State is a member of the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC)- a consortium of the Big Ten universities and the University of Chicago. SROP is one of several CIC cooperative programs that enrich and strengthen the educational experiences of students.

Tuesday, January 26, 2016

The Sport of Life and Death: The Mesoamerican Ballgame

The Sport of Life and Death: The Mesoamerican Ballgame. An online journey into the ancient spectacle of athletes and gods.

"An online educational companion to the traveling exhibition."
Explore World
  • Map and Timeline
    • Map Today
    • 1500 BC-1519 AD
  • Cultures
    • Olmec
    • Western Mexico
    • Teotihuacan
    • Maya
    • Veracruz
    • Toltec
    • Huastec
    • Aztec
  • Artwork
  • Ballgame
  • Site
Explore Game
  • The Ball
  • The Uniform
    • Yuguito
    • Yoke
    • Hacha
    • Palma
    • Manopla
    • See a parade of players
    • Learn about their team mascots
    • Visit the players' locker room
  • The Court
    • Walk Around a Court
    • Listen to an ancient Aztec Song
    • See a gallery of artwork from the courts
    • What can we learn from this ancient vessel?
  • The Game
    • Watch a game
    • How we play the game
    • What happened to the users?
    • Did women play?
Experience Game
  • Watch
    • Hear commentary
    • See more of this model
      • Side view
      • Top view
      • Spectators
      • Drummers
      • Players
  • Play
    • "Today you have a game against your rivals, the Deer. You can lead the Jaguars to victory through your knowledge of the Mesoamerican world. For every question you answer correctly, your team scores 1 point. Every time you miss a question, you drop the ball for your team and the Deer score a point. The First Team to 5 Points Wins!"
Experience Exhibit
Classroom Connections
  • Make a paper face mask
    • Visual arts, social studies, and math
    • Grades 3-5
  • Create a clay effigy vessel
    • Visual arts, social studies, language arts, and science
    • Grades 3-5
  • Craft headdress & costumes from paper
    • Visual arts and social studies
    • Grades 6-12
  • Mold clay ballgame figurines
    • Visual arts and social studies
    • Grades 3-12

Thursday, January 21, 2016

Meet Native America: Honorable Eric Robinson, Deputy Premier of Manitoba and Minister of Aboriginal and Northern Affairs

Meet Native American. The National Museum of the American Indian.

"In the interview series Meet Native America, the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian invites tribal leaders, cultural figures, and other interesting and accomplished Native individuals to introduce themselves and say a little about their lives and work. Together, their responses illustrate the diversity of the indigenous communities of the Western Hemisphere, as well as their shared concerns, and offer insights beyond what’s in the news to the ideas and experiences of Native peoples today." 
-Dennis Zotigh, NMAI 

Deputy Premier Robinson at the Aboriginal Peoples Choice Music Awards.  Manito Ahbee, Winnipeg, 2013. Image Courtesy of the National Museum of the American Indian's Blog.
Deputy Premier Robinson at the Aboriginal Peoples Choice Music Awards.
Manito Ahbee, Winnipeg, 2013.
Image Courtesy of the National Museum of the American Indian's Blog.
"How many bands are in Manitoba? Do you meet with the Native people of your province? 

There are 63 First Nations in the province:

Barren Lands First Nation, in Brochet, Manitoba
Berens River First Nation, Berens River 
Birdtail Sioux First Nation, Beulah 
Black River First Nation, O’hanley 
Bloodvein First Nation, Bloodvein 
Brokenhead Ojibway Nation, Scanterbury 
Buffalo Point First Nation, Buffalo Point 
Bunibonibee Cree Nation, Oxford House 
Canupawakpa Dakota First Nation, Pipestone 
Chemawawin Cree Nation, Easterville 
Cross Lake First Nation (Pimicikamak Cree Nation), Cross Lake 
Dakota Plains First Nation, Portage La Prairie 
Dakota Tipi First Nation, Dakota Tipi 
Dauphin River First Nation, Gypsumville 
Ebb and Flow First Nation, Ebb and Flow 
Fisher River Cree Nation, Koostatak 
Fort Alexander First Nation (Sagkeeng First Nation), Fort Alexander 
Fox Lake Cree Nation, Gillam 
Gamblers First Nation, Binscarth 
Garden Hill First Nation, Garden Hill 
God’s Lake First Nation, God’s Lake Narrows 
Hollow Water First Nation, Wanipigow 
Keeseekoowenin First Nation, Elphinstone 
Kinonjeoshtegon First Nation, Dallas 
Lake Manitoba First Nation, Lake Manitoba 
Lake St. Martin First Nation, Gypsumville 
Little Grand Rapids, Little Grand Rapids 
Little Saskatchewan First Nation, Gypsumville 
Long Plain First Nation, Portage la Prairie 
Manto Sipi Cree Nation, God’s River 
Marcel Colomb First Nation, Lynn Lake 
Mathias Colomb First Nation, Pukatawagan 
Misipawistik Cree Nation, Grand Rapids 
Mosakahiken Cree Nation, Moose Lake 
Nisichawayasihk Cree Nation, Nelson House 
Northlands First Nation, Lac Brochet 
Norway House Cree Nation, Norway House 
O-Chi-Chak-Ko-Sipi First Nation, Crane River 
Opaskwayak Cree Nation, Opaskwayak 
O-Pipon-Na-Piwin Cree Nation, South Indian Lake 
Pauingassi First Nation, Pauingassi 
Peguis First Nation, Peguis Reserve 
Pinaymootang First Nation, Fairford 
Pine Creek First Nation, Camperville 
Poplar River First Nation, Negginan 
Red Sucker Lake First Nation, Red Sucker Lake 
Rolling River First Nation, Erickson 
Roseau River Anishinabe First Nation, Ginew 
Sandy Bay First Nation, Marius 
Sapotaweyak Cree Nation, Pelican Rapids 
Sayisi Dene First Nation, Tadoule Lake 
Shamattawa First Nation, Shamattawa 
Sioux Valley Dakota, Griswold 
Skownan First Nation, Skownan 
St. Theresa Point First Nation, St. Theresa Point 
Swan Lake First Nation, Swan Lake 
Tataskweyak Cree Nation, Split Lake 
Tootinaowaziibeeng Treaty Reserve, Tootinaowaziibeeng 
War Lake First Nation, Ilford 
Wasagamack First Nation, Wasagamack 
Waywayseecappo First Nation Treaty Four, Waywayseecappo 
Wuskwi Sipihk First Nation, Birch River 
York Factory First Nation, York Landing 

Manitoba is also the home of an important Metis population. As minister and as member for Kewatinook, I meet with Indigenous people virtually every day. 

Do the Native people in Manitoba vote in provincial elections? 

Native people got the right to vote in 1960. "

To read the full interviewclick here.

Manitoba Aboriginal and Northern Affairs website.


Wednesday, January 20, 2016

People Roamed Tip of South America 18,500 Years Ago

November 30, 2015.
Bruce Bower, of ScienceNews, has written an interesting article about new radiocarbon dates for Monte Verde, Chile; one of the earliest known sites of human occupation within the Americas.
New finds have been dated to between 18,500 to 17,000 years ago.

"Archaeologists searching for further pre-Clovis sites will need to keep an eye out for simple tools and remnants of small hearths or campfires, Dillehay adds. Remains of Clovis sites, which typically feature separate areas for cooking, toolmaking and other activities, are easier to spot.

The discoveries at Monte Verde “point to a new kind of site that needs much more study” to understand when people first reached the Americas, remarks archaeologist Daniel Sandweiss of the University of Maine in Orono. "

To read the full articleclick here.

For more information,
Visit: