Tuesday, August 25, 2015

Celestial Charts: Exploring and Observing Space at the Geography and Map Division

August 13, 2015.
Carolyn Osborn, of the Library of Congress Geography and Map Division, has written a brief introductory post about the collections within the Geography & Map Reading Room.

"Approximately half of the Geography and Map Division’s celestial charts are uncatalogued. Even fewer have been digitally scanned. So just because it’s not online, doesn’t mean we don’t have it! All of our acquisitions made since 1970 have corresponding digital catalog records, however, the rest of our collections are organized by a unique classification system devised for our Division. The Library’s geography/maps specialists are here to help should you have questions about the Library’s holdings."

To read the full postclick here.

Geography & Map Reading Room

"The Geography and Map Division of the Library of Congress provides cartographic and geographic information for all parts of the world to the Congress, Federal agencies, state and local governments, the scholarly community, and to the general public. It is the largest and most comprehensive cartographic collection in the world, numbering over 5.2 million maps, including 80,000 atlases, 25,000 geospatial datasets, 6,000 reference works, numerous globes and three-dimensional plastic relief models, and a large number of cartographic materials in other formats."
  • Teaching Astronomy Reference Guide
    • Online Resources for Science Education
    • Books on Introducing Astronomy
    • Books with Activities & Experiments
    • Books on Stargazing-Observations with Binoculars, Telescopes and the Naked Eye
    • Ancient Astronomy, Archaeoastronomy, Cosmology, History of Astronomy, Constellation Figures, and Mythology
    • Atlases, Charts, Maps, and Related Guides
    • Biographical Books
    • Clubs, Activities, Programs, Projects
    • Astronomy Education Journals
    • Textbooks
    • Conference and Workshop Proceedings
    • Library of Congress Resources for Educators
    • Astronomy Online Educational Resources
    • Citizen Science
    • Videos
    • Blogs
    • Other Social Media Channels
  • Archaeoastronomy Teaching Guide
    • Scope
    • Introductions to the Topic
    • Subject Headings
    • General Texts
    • Additional Titles
    • Specialized Titles
    • Related Titles
    • Reference Works
    • Conference Proceedings
    • Dissertations
    • Selected Dissertations
    • Abstracting and Indexing Services
    • Journals
    • Representative Journal Articles
    • Selected Materials
    • Additional Sources of Information
    • Selected Internet Resources

Monday, August 24, 2015

Federal Recognition for Virginia’s Pamunkey Tribe ‘a Long Time Coming'

Correspondent Vincent Schilling visited the Pamunkey Reservation to get tribal members' reactions to being the latest federally recognized tribe. Image Courtesy of Indian Country Today.
Correspondent Vincent Schilling visited the Pamunkey Reservation
to get tribal members' reactions to being the latest federally recognized tribe.
Image Courtesy of Indian Country Today.
July, 7, 2015.
Vincent Schilling, of Indian Country Today, has written a brief article about the recent federal recognition of the Pamunkey Indian Tribe.

" “Finally we are going to be recognized for the separate nation that we are and have been by other entities such as the state (of Virginia) and England. Now the United States government recognizes that. We are looking forward to establishing and having that relationship,” said Atkins Spivey. "

To read the full articleclick here.

"What is a federally recognized tribe?

A federally recognized tribe is an American Indian or Alaska Native tribal entity that is recognized as having a government-to-government relationship with the United States, with the responsibilities, powers, limitations, and obligations attached to that designation, and is eligible for funding and services from the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

Furthermore, federally recognized tribes are recognized as possessing certain inherent rights of self-government (i.e., tribal sovereignty) and are entitled to receive certain federal benefits, services, and protections because of their special relationship with the United States. At present, there are 566 federally recognized American Indian and Alaska Native tribes and villages."

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Wednesday, August 19, 2015

Jackson County Man Pleads Guilty to Buying Stolen Native American Remains

August, 5, 2015.
Kathy Lynn Gray, The Columbus Dispatch, has written a brief article about an Ohioan's one count of trafficking in Native American remains. This case was criminally prosecuted under the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) which "provides a process for museums and Federal agencies to return certain Native American cultural items -- human remains, funerary objects, sacred objects, or objects of cultural patrimony -- to lineal descendants, and culturally affiliated Indian tribes and Native Hawaiian organizations" -National NAGPRA.

"After the hearing, Jackson County Sheriff Tedd Frazier said that Beatty had purchased the remains of two adults and six juveniles from three men who had dug them up from a farm on Sour Run Road in the county. Some of the remains, believed to be prehistoric, were full skeletons, he said."

To read the full articleclick here.

For more information,
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Tuesday, August 18, 2015

exploratorium

exploratorium

"The Exploratorium is a museum of science, art, and human perception located in San Francisco, California. We believe that following your curiosity and asking questions can lead to amazing moments of discovery, learning, and awareness and can increase your confidence in your ability to understand how the world works. We also believe that being playful and having fun is an important part of the process for people of all ages.

We create tools and experiences that help you to become an active explorer: hundreds of explore-for-yourself exhibits; a website with over 50,000 pages of content; film screenings; workshops for lifelong learners including day camps for kids and family investigations; evening art and science events for adults—plus much more. We also create professional development programs for educators, and are at the forefront of changing the way science is taught. We share our exhibits and expertise with museums worldwide."
explore

  • Activities
    • Canoe Tour
    • A How-To Guide for Viewing Eclipses
    • People of the Arctic
    • Breaking the Mayan Code: Mayan Math
    • The Mayan Calendar Round: Keeping Time
    • Make Your Own Petroglyph!
  • Videos
  • Websites
    • Ancient Observatories
      • "Chaco Canyon and Chichén Itzá are two of many places in the world where ancient observers studied the sky. The buildings in these two locations reflect cycles that these observers saw in the heavens. The markings people left behind describe the importance of those cycles to ancient life. Use this teacher's guide as a basis for exploring ancient astronomy. We've provided classroom activities and supplemental material about the sun, seasons, ancient cultures, and the ways in which these cultures' relationship to the sun was expressed. Each module includes National Science Education Standards, downloadable versions of each activity, links to background material, media to use in your classroom, and more."
    • Chocolate Facts, History, and Factory Tour: Exploratorium Magazine
      • "This special online-only edition of Exploring takes a closer look at the sweet lure of chocolate. We'll examine the fascinating -- and often misreported -- history of chocolate, follow the chocolate-making process, and take an online visit to a chocolate factory. We'll also look at the science of chocolate, and find out about the latest research into the possible health effects of its consumption. Lastly, we'll explore the somewhat controversial question of why chocolate make us feel so good."
    • Never Lost
      • "Polynesians voyaged over vast expanses of open ocean, settling far-flung islands across the Pacific. They navigated without GPS systems, without maps, compasses, clocks, or sextants, relying on direct observation alone. They found clues all around them—in the rising and setting of the sun, moon, and stars, in the ocean swells, the winds, the currents, and the birds. Over time, knowledge of these wayfinding techniques dwindled and nearly disappeared. But today, traditional Polynesian navigation is experiencing a revival across Polynesia, especially in Hawai'i.  Join us in an exploration of Polynesian navigation, and learn to see the world as the ancient Polynesians saw it. Once you learn to find your way, you can never be truly lost—no matter where you go."
    • Science of Gardening
      • "Like all great endeavors, gardening is both a science and an art. See how plants we tend feed our bodies, our minds, and our senses."
education
  • Tools for Teaching & Learning
    • Websites
    • Educator Learning Commons
      • "This library and information hub supports the educational, professional development, and research needs of Exploratorium Teacher Institute alumni by providing access to a variety of electronic, multimedia, and print-based learning resources and technology."
    • Publications
    • Digital Library
      • "The collections in our digital library include images, educational activities in PDF and HTML formats, QuickTime movies, streaming media, and audio files related to interactive exhibits and scientific phenomena. Educators can search, select, and download digital files for individual, noncommercial educational use."
    • Science Teaching Tips Podcasts
      • "We have nearly 70 science-teaching podcasts. They offer pedagogy tips, science history, hands-on activities, and other ideas for science classrooms."

Monday, August 17, 2015

Meet Native America: Kathy DeCamp, Ho-Chunk Nation Legislator

Meet Native American. The National Museum of the American Indian.

"In the interview series Meet Native America, the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian invites tribal leaders, cultural figures, and other interesting and accomplished Native individuals to introduce themselves and say a little about their lives and work. Together, their responses illustrate the diversity of the indigenous communities of the Western Hemisphere, as well as their shared concerns, and offer insights beyond what’s in the news to the ideas and experiences of Native peoples today." 
-Dennis Zotigh, NMAI 

District Representative Kathy Decamp, Ho-Chunk Nation Legislature. Image Courtesy of the National Museum of the American Indian's Blog.
District Representative Kathy Decamp, Ho-Chunk Nation Legislature.
Image Courtesy of the National Museum of the American Indian's Blog.
"Where is your tribe located?

My tribe, the Ho-Chunk Nation, is located all throughout the state of Wisconsin—we are non-reservation. Our Tribal Headquarters are located in Black River Falls, Wisconsin. We are delineated by districts—four in the state and a district of at-large members who live outside Wisconsin.

We were formerly known as the Wisconsin Winnebago Tribe.

Where was the Ho-Chunk Nation originally from?

At one time in our history, the Ho-Chunk Nation originated from the Red Banks, near what is now known as Green Bay, Wisconsin. Ho-Chunks love to joke and tease, so we like to point out that the Green Bay Packers are located on what is traditionally Ho-Chunk country, but we are taught to be good to our visitors. Our lands occupied most of the state of Wisconsin and some parts of northern Illinois."

Friday, August 14, 2015

Who You Callin' a Savage? The Beauty and Brilliance of Indian Science

A perfect example is the Matsês indigenous people of the Peruvian Amazon recently released the first Traditional Medicine Encyclopedia to a positive reception, but how will it be taken? Image Courtesy of acaté Amazon Conservation and Indian Country Today.
A perfect example is the Matsês indigenous people of the Peruvian Amazon
 recently released the first Traditional Medicine Encyclopedia to a positive reception,
 but how will it be taken?
Image Courtesy of acaté Amazon Conservation and Indian Country Today.
August, 3, 2015.
Steve Russell, Indian Country Today, has written an informative article about the relationship between indigenous knowledge and science.

"The traditional knowledge of Indigenous Peoples is often considered sacred, but it avoids similar collisions with science in several ways. The most obvious is that our ideas of how the world is ordered are mostly, like science, based on observation, albeit observations that reach very different conclusions based upon stories we hesitate to abandon. The wisdom of “companion planting” corn, beans, and squash was self-evident. Scientific verification came later."

To read the full articleclick here.

For more information,
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Thursday, August 13, 2015

NAGPRA Awards $1.5 Million for Repatriation of Ancestors' Remains and Sacred Objects

July, 23, 2015.
Indian Country Today has written an informative article about recent grants under the Native American Graves and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) which will allow the remains of over 300 ancestors to return home.

"Besides repatriating more than 300 ancestors, the grants will enable the return of “numerous funerary and traditional items to Indian tribes across the United States, travel by Indian tribal representatives to consultations with museums holding potentially affiliated remains and other cultural items, specialized training for both museums and tribes on NAGPRA, and the development of a tribal coalition to collaborate and facilitate the repatriation of significant collections currently in museums,” the NPS said."

To read the full articleclick here.

For more information,
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Wednesday, August 12, 2015

Indigenous Diversities: Each Nation is Different

Participants at the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples, held at the UN Headquarters in September 2014. Image Courtesy of Yubi Hoffman, the United Nations, and Indian Country Today.
Participants at the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples, held at the UN Headquarters in September 2014.
Image Courtesy of Yubi Hoffman, the United Nations, and Indian Country Today.
July, 26, 2015.
Duane Champaign, of Indian Country Today, has written a thoughtful article about the importance of respecting a diverse range of cultures, traditions, and histories.

"Indigeneity is not expressed as a common identity, culture, or government. There is no common indigenous identity, culture, or government. Indigenous Peoples want to express their own specific cultures and identities. There is no common indigenous identity, there are a large number of indigenous identities. The common cause that unites contemporary Indigenous Peoples at the international level is the result of similar threats from nation states that do not fully recognize indigenous claims to land, self-government, culture, and other indigenous rights."

To read the full articleclick here.

For more information,
Visit:

Tuesday, August 11, 2015

Library of Congress Collections: Rare Book & Special Collections Reading Room


The Library of Congress



This view of St. Augustine is the earliest engraving of any locality that is now in the United States. The English fleet lies at anchor, the infantry troops having disembarked and are attacking the Spanish settlement on May 28 and 29, 1586. To see more, visit the online exhibit of The Cultures and History of the Americas; the Jay I. Kislak Collection. Image Courtesy of the Library of Congress.
This view of St. Augustine is the earliest engraving of any locality that is now in the United States.
The English fleet lies at anchor, the infantry troops having disembarked and are attacking the Spanish settlement
on May 28 and 29, 1586. From the online exhibit of The Cultures and History of the Americas; the Jay I. Kislak Collection.
 Image Courtesy of the Library of Congress.

"Today the division's collections amount to nearly 800,000 books, broadsides, pamphlets, theater playbills, title pages, prints, posters, photographs, and medieval and Renaissance manuscripts. Although the division's materials have come into its custody for a variety of reasons--their monetary value, importance in the history of printing, binding, association interest, or fragility, they have one point in common: the collections offer scholarly documentation about the western and American traditions of life and learning."

  • Introduction
  • American History
  • American Literature
  • Book Arts
  • The Illustrated Book
  • List of Selected Special Collections
  • Concordance of Images
    • How to order copies of the images



  • Books
  • Catalogs
  • Exhibits
  • Discovery and Exploration
    • "documents the discovery and exploration with both manuscripts and published maps. Many of these maps reflect the European Age of Discoveries, dating from the late 15th century to the 17th century when Europeans were concerned primarily with determining the outline of the continents as they explored and mapped the coastal areas and the major waterways. Also included are 18th and 19th century maps documenting the exploration and mapping of the interior parts of the continents, reflecting the work of Lewis and Clark and subsequent government explorers and surveyors."
    • Essay about the 1562 Map of America
    • Collections Items
  • Louisiana: European Explorations and the Louisiana Purchase
    • "This presentation focuses on the various documents from maps to newspapers to cultural artifact that help to describe the region of North America that stretched from as far east as Alabama into what is now the state of  Montana.  The 119 items presented here come from the various special and general collections of the Library of Congress."
    • Essay on the Exploration and Legacy of the Louisiana Territory
    • Collections Items
  • Military Battles and Campaigns
    • "This category contains maps showing campaigns of major military conflicts including troop movements, defensive structures and groundworks, roads to and from sites of military engagements, campsites, and local buildings, topography and vegetation. Some of the maps are manuscripts drawn on the field of battle, while others are engraved including some that have manuscript annotations reflecting the history of the battle or campaign. A significant number of battle maps provide information about the locality that is not available elsewhere such as the location of plantations, the names of landowners in the area, the configuration of small towns and villages, and indications of prior settlement by native Americans."
    • Collections Items
  • Rochambeau Map Collection
    • "contains cartographic items used by Jean Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau (1725-1807), when he was commander in chief of the French expeditionary army (1780-82) during the American Revolution. The maps were from Rochambeau's personal collection, cover much of eastern North America, and date from 1717 to 1795. The maps show Revolutionary-era military actions, some of which were published in England and France, and early state maps from the 1790s. Many of the items in this extraordinary group of maps show the importance of cartographic materials in the campaigns of the American Revolution as well as Rochambeau's continuing interest in the new United States.The collection consists of 40 manuscript and 26 printed maps, and a manuscript atlas, the originals of which are in the Library of Congress' Geography and Map Division."
    • Collections Items
Rare Book Webcasts

Friday, August 7, 2015

Uncovering the Sacred: 3,000 More Petroglyphs Identified at Jeffers

"The petroglyphs include carvings of deer, buffalo, turtles, thunderbirds and humans, and are powerful cultural symbols. According to Joe Williams, Dakota elder, the handprint represents friendship and understanding, “For Indian people, the handprint says we are still here.” (Minnesota Historical Society)." Image Courtesy of Indian Country Today.
"The petroglyphs include carvings of deer, buffalo, turtles, thunderbirds and humans,
and are powerful cultural symbols. According to Joe Williams, Dakota elder,
the handprint represents friendship and understanding,
“For Indian people, the handprint says we are still here.” (Minnesota Historical Society)."
 Image Courtesy of Indian Country Today.
July 13, 2015.
Indian Country Today has written an informative article about the recent discovery of 3,000 new petroglyphs at the Jeffers Petroglyphs in Minnesota.

"For 7,000 years American Indian ancestors carved into the stones at Red Rock Ridge in what is today Minnesota—symbols that would leave proof of their lives, and a window into their beliefs, histories, and hopes for the future."

To read the full articleclick here.

For more information,
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