Thursday, May 21, 2015

World Heritage Sites in the United States

January 29, 2015.
Brenda Barrett,of Living Landscape Observer, has written an interesting post about the number of UNESCO World Heritage sites in the United States and what importance this international recognition has on the sites.

"Why is recognition as a World Heritage site important? The motivations vary from country to country, but include such factors as national pride and of course the economic value of increased attention and tourism. In the past, the U.S. involvement the program has not been touted. A site’s World Heritage status was only recognized in the fine print in a brochure or by a small plaque. However, this is changing. "

To read the full postclick here.

For more information,
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Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Meet Native America: Wayne Mackanear Brown, Principal Chief of the Meherrin Nation

Meet Native American. The National Museum of the American Indian.

"In the interview series Meet Native America, the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian invites tribal leaders, cultural figures, and other interesting and accomplished Native individuals to introduce themselves and say a little about their lives and work. Together, their responses illustrate the diversity of the indigenous communities of the Western Hemisphere, as well as their shared concerns, and offer insights beyond what’s in the news to the ideas and experiences of Native peoples today." 
-Dennis Zotigh, NMAI 


Principal Chief Wayne Mackanear Brown on Meherrin tribal land. The three figures at the lower edge of the chief's regalia represent the Tuscarora, Meherrin, and Nottoway peoples - nations of the Southern Iroquois Confederacy. Image Courtesy of the National Museum of the American Indian's Blog.
Principal Chief Wayne Mackanear Brown on Meherrin tribal land.
The three figures at the lower edge of the chief's regalia
represent the Tuscarora, Meherrin, and Nottoway peoples
- nations of the Southern Iroquois Confederacy.
Image Courtesy of the National Museum of the American Indian's Blog.
"Where is the Meherrin Nation located?
Our tribal office is in Ahoskie, North Carolina—near Potecasi Creek in Hertford County.

Where were the Meherrin people originally from?
According to Mohawk history, approximately 2,000 years ago the Haudenosaunee lived in the Great Plains alongside the great river called the Mississippi. Their closest friends and allies were the Pawnee Nation. For unknown reasons all the Haudenosaunee Nations, including the Meherrin, left and started a migration up the Ohio River Trail towards the Great Lakes. The Tuscarora, Meherrin, andNottoway split off from their brothers and traveled down the Kanawha River. The Meherrin settled in what is now Emporia, Virginia."

Tuesday, May 19, 2015

First Peoples of Canada Virtual Exhibit

First Peoples of Canada: Presenting the history and continuing presence of Aboriginal people in Canada.

Introduction
"This virtual exhibition looks at some facets of the history of Canada's Aboriginal peoples, underlining their fight for cultural survival and indicating the wealth of their modern-day contributions. It is based largely on information and artifacts presented in the First Peoples Hall of the Canadian Museum of Civilization. Neither pretends to be a comprehensive presentation of the history of all the Native groups in Canada. Rather, aspects of cultural identity are explored through four themes: the diversity of Aboriginal cultural expression; how the Aboriginal presence manifests itself within present-day Canada; the adaptation of traditional lifestyles to different environments across Canada; and the impact of the arrival and settlement of Europeans over the last 500 years."

  • Names
  • Languages
  • Population

An Aboriginal Presence

  • We Are Diverse
  • We Are the Land
    • We find the knowledge of our ancestors in...
    • We find the experience of our ancestors in...
  • Naming the Land
  • Markers on the Land
  • Our Origins
    • Archaeology
      • At the Edge of the Ice
      • As the World Took Its Present Form
      • Origin Stories
        • Sky Woman
      • Wealth of Stories
        • Why the Porcupine has Quills (Anishnaabe)
        • The Bear Mother
        • Mishebeshu (Ojibwa)
        • A Horned Serpent

An Ancient Bond with the Land

  • Arctic Whalers
  • Communal Hunters
  • Maritime Peoples
    • The Aboriginal Peoples of Atlantic Canada
    • A Time of Plenty
    • Bountiful Land and Sea
    • A Time of Sharing
    • A Time of Scarcity
    • Inland Pursuits
    • Winter Travel
    • Maritime People Today
  • People of the Longhouse
    • "This Old Island"
    • The Forest and the Clearing
    • The Forest
    • Changing Human-Plant Relationships
    • The Clearing
    • The People of Longhouses
    • The Longhouse as a Home
    • The Longhouse as a Household
    • Pottery: Learning from Our Mothers
    • Clans and Clan Mothers
    • Women's Influence on the Men's World
    • Keeping the Fire Burning
  • Trade Fairs
    • Many Kinds of Exchange
    • A Mandan-Assiniboine Example
    • A Festive Occasion
    • A Well-Orchestrated Event
    • Ceremonial Trading
    • Meeting Distant Peoples
    • Private Trading
    • Entertainment
    • Trade Today

Arrival of Strangers- The Last 500 Years

  • Early Relations
    • Alliances during the Fur Trade Period
    • Middlemen and Trappers
    • Explorations: Assistance and Resistance
    • Population and Ideintity
  • The Métis
    • Diversity
    • Economy
  • Beliefs
    • Conversion
    • New Symbols and a Changing Landscape
    • Residential Schools
    • Agriculture versus Traditional Lifeways
    • Retention of Traditional Beliefs
    • The Innu Land, Nitassinan, and the Innu Drum
  • Intergovernmental Relations
    • Alliances
    • Treaties
    • Legislation
    • Reserves and Other Communities
  • Economy
    • Trapping
    • Farming
    • High-Steel Workers
    • Canneries
    • Crafts and Cottage Industries
    • Retention of Traditional Practices
  • Social Gatherings
    • Religious Gatherings
    • Competitions and Gambling
    • Pow-wows, Rodeos, and Ranching
  • Affirmation
    • Veterans
    • Women
    • Politics and Law
    • Humor
  • Art
    • Art as an Expression of the Group
    • Art as an Expression of the Individual Self

Resources

Index

Monday, May 18, 2015

Quillwork-Embellished “Cree” Coat: Object Analysis for Anthropology of Museums

Quillwork-embellished leather coat collected by George Byron Gordon. Image Courtesy of Margaret Bruchac and the Penn Museum. Museum Object Number: NA3635.
Quillwork-embellished leather coat collected by George Byron Gordon.
Image Courtesy of Margaret Bruchac and the Penn Museum. Museum
Object Number: NA3635.
April, 30, 2015.
Pauline Saribas, of the Penn Museum Blog, has written a reflective post about a quillwork embellished "Cree" hide coat from the Penn Museum's collection which was obtained from the Hudson's Bay Company.

"It is hard to know what this particular coat meant to its Native maker and wearer. There is only slight evidence of wear on the inside and sleeve ends, suggesting it was rarely worn. Perhaps it was made specifically for a collector? Since the quillwork displays such careful symmetry, perhaps it was regalia to be worn on a special occasion? "

To read the full postclick here.

For more information,
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Friday, May 15, 2015

As the river rises: Cahokia's emergence and decline linked to Mississippi River flooding

This is a modeled map of Cahokia and present-day St. Louis after the historic 1844 flood of the Mississippi River. Image Courtesy of Samuel Munoz and ScienceDaily.
This is a modeled map of Cahokia and present-day St. Louis
 after the historic 1844 flood of the Mississippi River.
Image Courtesy of Samuel Munoz and ScienceDaily.
May, 4, 2015.
University of Wisconsin-Madison, in ScienceDaily, has written a brief summary article about recent research into the collapse of Cahokia, an American Indian city which began to decline
around 1200 A.D. and is currently an UNESCO World Heritage Site.

"Cahokia appears to have fractured and its people began to migrate to other parts of North America. By 1400, after the arid conditions that suppressed large floods and favored Cahokia's rise had passed, it was deserted.

While many factors likely contributed to Cahokia's decline -- from extreme events like droughts or floods, to the inherent instability archaeologists and anthropologists have documented in other chiefdom societies -- a major flooding event could have been the proverbial last straw."

To read the full articleclick here.

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Thursday, May 14, 2015

Madam Sacho: How One Iroquois Woman Survived the American Revolution

May/June 2015.
Sarah M.S. Pearsall, of the NEH's Humanities magazine, has written a moving and informative article about the history of the American Revolution and the policies
toward the Haudenosaunee or Six Nations (Iroquois).

"The image of the disappearing Indian is one that has filled many American narratives, as historian Jean O’Brien has argued. The land of the Six Nations was not in fact a ghost land, but as the Haudenosaunee had little to which to return, many did indeed flee to Fort Niagara. Rehearsing an American takeover of the land of the Six Nations, with the easily vanquished Sacho the only Indian left, allowed Anglo-Americans actually to take it over. Yet the people of this great League did not disappear. Modern Haudenosaunee people live on a range of reservations in the United States and Canada, as well as in many other places, and still have treaties with the U.S. Even in the face of systematic violence, the Haudenosaunee people survived. Narratives about both the violence, and the ability to resist it, can and should be part of our accounts of American history."

To read the full articleclick here.

For more information,
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Wednesday, May 13, 2015

Mackosi’kwe’s Baskets: Marking Relationships & Potato Stamps and Ash Splints

Mackosi’kwe (Mrs. Michel Buckshot,. Photo taken by Frank Speck. Mss. Ms. Coll. 126, Image 1-2-b. American Philosophical Society Digital Collections. Image Courtesy of Penn Museum Blog.
Mackosi’kwe (Mrs. Michel Buckshot,. Photo taken by Frank Speck.
Mss. Ms. Coll. 126, Image 1-2-b. American Philosophical Society Digital Collections.
 Image Courtesy of Penn Museum Blog.
April, 24, 2015.
Margaret Bruchac, of the Penn Museum Blog, has written a detailed and informative post about the Penn Museum's collection of dye stamps and ash splints created by Mackosi’kwe, of the River Desert Algonquian Band at the Maniwaki Reserve; now known as the Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg.

"The items in the River Desert collection have been described as “common” and “utilitarian,” but they are much more. The objects created by Mackosi’kwe and other Algonquin artisans express Indigenous technology, ecological adaptability, and local aesthetics, woven into every piece of raw material, every stitch, every mark. "

To read the full postclick here.

May 5, 2015.
Elizabeth Peng, of the Penn Museum Blog, has written a follow-up post about the Penn Museum's collection of dye stamps and ash splints created by Mrs. Michel Buckshot, of the River Desert Algonquian Band at the Maniwaki Reserve; now known as the Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg.

"During the 1920s, a collection of potato die stamps illustrating the process of stamping baskets, along with the corresponding stamped ash splints, entered Johnson’s possession. He commissioned Mrs. Buckshot to create these potato die stamps, in order to show the traditional use of vegetable stamps and herbal dyes to decorate ash splint baskets. The dies, which are now preserved (likely in alcohol) inside a glass jar, consist of chunks of potatoes onto which various shapes have been carved, such as leaves and other organic shapes. Even today there are remnants of colored pigment on at least one of the stamp surfaces. "

To read the full postclick here.

For more information,
Visit:
* Link provided requires a sign in to ProQuest Congressional
Ohio State University students can use their student log-in to access the database

Tuesday, May 12, 2015

UNESCO World Heritage Sites: Which Contain Earthworks or Monumental Architecture*


"The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) seeks to encourage the identification, protection and preservation of cultural and natural heritage around the world considered to be of outstanding value to humanity."

"Heritage is our legacy from the past, what we live with today, and what we pass on
 to future generations. Our cultural and natural heritage are both 
irreplaceable sources of life and inspiration."

UNESCO World Heritage Site:
Pre-Hispanic City of Chichen-Itza, Mexico.
Image Courtesy of M & G Therin-Weise
and UNESCO World Heritage.

Americas

UNESCO World Heritage Site:
Complex of Koguryo Tombs, Democratic People's Republic of Korea.
Image Courtesy of Geoff Steven and UNESCO World Heritage.

Asia


UNESCO World Heritage Site:
Image Courtesy of Ron Van Oers and UNESCO World Heritage.



Middle East


UNESCO World Heritage Site Stone Circles of Senegambia, Gambia. Image Courtesy of UNESCO World Heritage.
UNESCO World Heritage Site:
Image Courtesy of UNESCO World Heritage.



Africa







UNESCO World Heritage Site:  Stonehenge, Avebury and Associated Sites, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.   Image Courtesy of Megumi Takimoto and UNESCO World Heritage.
UNESCO World Heritage Site:
Stonehenge, Avebury and Associated Sites,
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.
Image Courtesy of Megumi Takimoto and UNESCO World Heritage.
Europe
*This list is not comprehensive and does not include any tentative nominations.

Monday, May 11, 2015

Meet Native America: Ted Grant, Vice-Chairman of the Otoe–Missouria Tribe

Meet Native American. The National Museum of the American Indian.

"In the interview series Meet Native America, the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian invites tribal leaders, cultural figures, and other interesting and accomplished Native individuals to introduce themselves and say a little about their lives and work. Together, their responses illustrate the diversity of the indigenous communities of the Western Hemisphere, as well as their shared concerns, and offer insights beyond what’s in the news to the ideas and experiences of Native peoples today." 
-Dennis Zotigh, NMAI 


Ted Grant, vice-chairman of the Otoe–Missouria Tribe. The tribal seal in the background shows the seven clans of the Otoe–Missouria, with a prayer feather at the center. Image Courtesy of the National Museum of the American Indian's Blog.
Ted Grant, vice-chairman of the Otoe–Missouria Tribe.
The tribal seal in the background shows the seven clans of the Otoe–Missouria,
with a prayer feather at the center.
Image Courtesy of the National Museum of the American Indian's Blog.
"Where is your community located?
The Otoe–Missouria Tribal Complex is located in north central Oklahoma in Noble County.

Where were your people originally from?
At one time the Otoes and Missourias, along with the Winnebago and Iowa peoples, were part of a single tribe that lived in the Great Lakes region of the United States. In the 16th century the tribes separated from each other and migrated west and south, although they still lived near each other in the lower Missouri River Valley."

Friday, May 8, 2015

Mysterious Nazca Line Geoglyphs Formed Ancient Pilgrimage Route

Video Courtesy of UNESCO.
May, 1, 2015.
Tia Ghose, of LiveScience, has written an exciting article about current research by Yamagata University which suggests the Nazca Lines, a series of amazing Peruvian geoglyphs, may have been made by at least two groups of people. The Lines and Geoglyphs of Nazca and Pampas de Jumana
 are a UNESCO World Heritage site.

"In recent years, researchers at Yamagata University in Japan have uncovered 100 geoglpyhs, as well as shards of broken ceramics at the intersection points of some of the lines.

To understand exactly how all of these images fit together, Masato Sakai of Yamagata University and his colleagues analyzed the location, style and method of construction for some of these newfound geoglpyhs. Sakai found that about four different styles of geoglyphs tended to be clustered together along different routes leading to a vast pre-Incan temple complex in Peru known as Cahuachi."

To read the full articleclick here.

For more information,
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