Friday, July 31, 2015

Shawnee Nations Take a Cultural Road Trip: Destination NMAI

June, 12, 2015.
Mary Annette Pember, of Indian Country Today, has written a brief article about the recent visit by over 60 members of the Absentee Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma, Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma, and the Shawnee Tribe to the Fort Ancient earthworks in Ohio on their way to a heritage celebration held by the National Museum of the American Indian.

"Joseph Blanchard, Absentee Shawnee Cultural Preservation Director and Tribal Historic Preservation Officer, explained that he got the idea for the national all-inclusive Shawnee festival several months ago. He imagined the event as a collaborative effort presenting Shawnee people and their culture as a contemporary group who still actively practice their traditions and speak their language."

To read the full articleclick here.

For more information,
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Thursday, July 30, 2015

Trees Removed From Shrum Mound; Other Grounds Are Under Study

Current view of Shrum Mound.
 Image Courtesy of Eli Hiller and The Columbus Dispatch.
July, 25, 2015.
Earl Rinehart, of The Columbus Dispatch, has written a short but interesting article about
the Ohio History Connection's recent removal of trees from the Shrum Mound; thought to have been built during the Adena time period (800 B.C. - 100 B.C.). The Ohio History Connection is also discussing the impact of trees on other earthworks sites they manage; such as the Newark Earthworks, built during the Hopewell time period (100 B.C. - 400 A.D.).

"Imagine someone using a backhoe to dig up your relative’s grave, casket and all.

Now imagine a 30-foot tree toppled by high winds, its thick roots ripping apart an ancient Indian burial mound."

To read the full articleclick here.

For more information,
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Tuesday, July 28, 2015

Native American Material in the Clarke Historical Library, Central Michigan University

Clarke Historical Library, Central Michigan University.

"The Clarke Library has the most complete collection in the state regarding Michigan's first people. Within the Clarke a wealth of secondary studies are complimented by the work of Native American authors as well as very complete sets of microfilmed records from the federal government. There is also an extensive body of material created by religious missionaries 
and a large number of volumes printed in Ojibway."

Anishinabe Art: The Olga Denison Collection
Lidded Basket with Tray, 1976  by Alice Bennett (Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan),  Black ash splints, 14" x 12". Image Courtesy of the Clarke Historical Library, Central Michigan University.
Lidded Basket with Tray, 1976
by Alice Bennett (Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan),
Black ash splints, 14" x 12".
Image Courtesy of the Clarke Historical Library, Central Michigan University.

"The artistic traditions of the Anishinabe, the Native peoples of Michigan and the surrounding region, reach back in prehistory and embrace a multitude of materials. Art continues to be an important aspect in the contemporary life of these communities. The Olga Denison Collection of Anishinabe art largely represents the contemporary expression of many traditional native crafts."
  • Beadwork
  • Black Ash Baskets
  • Pottery
  • Quill Work on Birch Bark
  • Sculpture
  • Sweetgrass Baskets
  • Works on Paper and Canvas

Bibliography of Clarke Material

"The Clarke Historical Library holdings are particularly rich in materials on the Native Americans of Michigan. Included in this bibliography are books, periodicals, manuscripts, maps and graphics on the subject. Because traditional tribal boundaries are not codeterminus with contemporary state borders, some of the material listed in this bibliography has a wider geographic focus than Michigan, but the emphasis is on Michigan.

Annotations have been made as far as possible from the author, editor or publisher's own words. Where that was not possible a brief content description was made. Annotations were selected which are content oriented. Little attempt has been made to evaluate the material. Even though a publication may contain more than one subject they have been entered into this bibliography only once, where the compiler thought most appropriate."
  • Archaeology
  • Arts & Crafts
  • Biography
  • Education
  • Ethnography
  • Explorers and Travelers
  • Fur Trade
  • Geneology
  • General
  • Government Relations
  • Literature and Legends
  • Local History
  • Mascots
  • Missionaries and Missions
  • Native Language Materials
  • Removal
  • Treaties
  • Treaty Rights
  • Wars
  • Maps
Native American Children's Literature

"a compilation of books for children by and about Native Americans in the collection of the Clarke Historical Library. It is not inclusive of all the literature available, only what is in the Clarke Historical Library. "
  • Multimedia Resources
  • Stories, Folklore, Legends, and Fiction
  • Textbooks, Nonfiction, Biography
Isabella County Documents

  • Allottment
  • Allotment Page 1
  • Allotment Page 2
  • Allotment Page 3
  • Allotment Page 4
  • Allotment Page 5
  • Allotment Page 6
  • Annuity Rolls
  • Gruett Roll

    Excerpts from the Michigan Pioneer & Historical Collections

    Schematics of ancient Native American burial mounds. Image Courtesy of the Clarke Historical Library, Central Michigan University.
    Image Courtesy of the Clarke Historical Library, Central Michigan University.
    "Produced from materials presented at the annual meetings of the Michigan Pioneer and Historical Society, the collections contain a high quantity of primary resources and historical papers concerning many aspects of Michigan's past.

    The MPHC consists of forty 600 to 700 page volumes. Each volume includes letters, speeches, memorial reports, private and professional papers of individuals, as well as personal remembrances and historical essays. The bulk of these materials span a period of roughly two hundred years, from 1650 to 1850. However, these dates are not entirely inclusive. For example, the collections contain essays written about Michigan's ancient burial mounds as well as documents from the civil war era. It is also important to note that while most of the MPHC concerns the events and people of Michigan's past, materials pertaining to other parts of the mid-west are included as well."
    • American Revolution
    • The Battle of Fallen Timbers
    • Biographies
    • Conflicts between Native Americans
    • Criminality and Legality
    • Ethnography
    • Fur Trade
    • General Relations with the Americans
    • General Relations with the British
    • General Relations with the French
    • Native American Missions and Missionaries
    • Native American Presents and Gift Giving
    • Pontiac's Conspiracy
    • Prehistory and Archaeology
    • Speeches and Councils
      • with other Native Americans
      • with the French
      • with the United States
      • with the British
    • Treaties
    • War of 1812
    Isabella Indian Reservation

    "When much of the public thinks of "Indian reservations" they almost invariably envision a remote, dusty location somewhere in the desert southwest. It frequently surprises people when they learn that Michigan has within its boundaries many Indian reservations. One of the earliest and most historically interesting was founded in Isabella County in 1855. Unfortunately, the early history of the Isabella County reservation is poorly documented and surrounded by considerable myth and misinformation.

    We hope that by presenting Mr. Keenan's research regarding the reservation many of these myths and errors can be corrected. Should readers disagree with Mr. Keenan's facts or interpretation, we hope they will work toward documenting alternate ideas and thus help create an even richer understanding of the Isabella County reservation."

    • Coming of the Chippewa to Isabella County
    • Indian Mills on the Chippewa River
    • Indian Schools and Churches
    • Land, Lumber, and Money
    • Bibliography
    Native American Treaties: Their Ongoing Importance 


    "This web page focuses on the negotiations that have occurred between Euro-Americans and three Native American communities, the Chippewa, Odawa, and Potawatomi.

    This web site explores the treaties that effect the people, Indian and Euro-American, who live in Michigan, and offers six case studies to explain how treaties signed between 1795 and 1864 had relevance in the past and continue to have importance today. We welcome you to read the treaties and consider the case studies. "

    • Understanding Treaties
    • Text of Michigan Related Treaties
    • Historical Issues
    • Contemporary Issues
    Native American Treaty Signers in the Great Lakes Region

    "The negotiators who represented the American Republic often held deeply stereotypical views about the Native Americans they negotiated with which echoed through much of the nineteenth and twentieth century literature about Indians.... 
    This web version of the exhibit includes two highlights of Native American Treaty Signers. The first are the images of 22 Native American leaders drawn in the 1820s by J. O. Lewis and published by Lewis in full color between 1835 and 1836. Also included on this web page is the essay about these leaders which was originally published in the catalog that accompanied the exhibit."
    • Images
    • Essays

    Friday, July 24, 2015

    Basketmakers' tradition of storing black ash logs in water effective in killing EAB

    Tina Ciaramitaro, USDA Forest Service Technician, and Tom Baweja, USDA Forest Service Biological Aide, toss logs into the Red Cedar River near Okemos, Michigan. Image Courtesy of Phys.org.
    Tina Ciaramitaro, USDA Forest Service Technician, and Tom Baweja,
    USDA Forest Service Biological Aide,  toss logs into the Red Cedar River
     near Okemos, Michigan.  Image Courtesy of Phys.org.
    July, 17, 2015.
    Phys.org, has written an interesting article about a partnership between artisans from the Match-e-be-nash-she-wish Band of Potawatomi Indians, the USDA Forest Service, and the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service in testing the traditional practice of submerging black ash logs against the emerald ash borer (EAB) and its larvae with the goal of
    preserving the wood for future basketmaking.

    "Black ash has been prized for centuries by traditional basketmakers for its ring-porous wood, which allows layers of xylem - the cells and vessels that transport water up a tree and creates tree rings - to be easily separated. The loss of black ash to the emerald ash borer has sparked concern about preserving black ash for use in basketmaking as well as the potential for spreading EAB by transporting untreated logs from forests to locations where they are pounded and split and ultimately used for basketmaking."

    To read the full articleclick here.

    For more information,
    Visit:

    Wednesday, July 22, 2015

    Museum Team Unearth a 4,000-Year-Old Home in Sheffield (OH)

    View of the Burrell Orchard site, a prehistoric Native American settlement near the Black River in Sheffield Village, OH. Image Courtesy of Marvin Fong, The Plain Dealer.
    View of the Burrell Orchard site, a prehistoric Native American settlement
    near the Black River in Sheffield Village, OH.
    Image Courtesy of Marvin Fong, The Plain Dealer.
    July, 14, 2015.
    Tom Feran, of The Plain Dealer, has written an exciting article about the recent discovery of a 4,000 year old house (within the Archaic). Dr. Brian Redmond believes that the 'inhabitants were not indigenous people of Northeast Ohio, but are most similar to tribes found in Northeast Kentucky and southern Illinois'.

    "The uncovered floor, which is about 3 inches thick, is built of layers of yellow clay that was carried from nearby areas. An unmistakable basin is built into it, as are cooking pits and storage holes that held hickory nuts, which were an important source of nutrition.

    Dark spots in the clay around the edges of the floor are the remains of organic material. They are "post molds" from the post holes that would have anchored hickory saplings. The saplings would have been tied together, wigwam-style, in a framework for the prehistoric house. Layers of cattail mats would have covered the framing."

    To read the full articleclick here.

    For more information,
    Visit:

    Tuesday, July 21, 2015

    Trading Ideas Online Exhibit


    "Come and discover the First Nations of northeastern North America through their great trade gatherings. You will discover the way of life and material culture of the Iroquoians and Algonquians, and in particular their trading activities. Trade was very important for the First Nations. It made it possible for them to exchange their surplus items for resources and items that they lacked, and also to form political and military alliances."

    Home

    Screenshot of the Trade Activity Introduction and procedures.

    "Your mission is to find the item that you need and trade your item for it.

    Along the way you will have to answer questions about various items of that era. You must correctly answer a minimum of 5 questions in order to finish the game.

    During the game, you will have to make friends. Since you belong to a nation or a confederation, you must make at least one friend in each of the five nations and confederations represented in the game.

    After you have made 5 friends, answered 5 questions, and traded your item for the one you are looking for, you must wait to see if everyone else finishes within the allotted time [30 minutes] for you all to win as a group."

    "This game is played as a team in the classroom. A minimum of 6 players (including the creator of the session) is required to start a session, with a maximum of 30 players. Each player must have access to a computer."

    "When we use the names Iroquoian and Algonquian we are referring to linguistic families. Simply put, a linguistic family is made up of groups of people who speak languages that are similar."
    • The Algonquians
    • The Iroquoians
    The Trade Network
    • Strength Through Trade
    • Worth the Detour!
    • Sought After Items
    • Toll Routes
    • The Trade Gathering
    • Items of Interest
    • Trading Things
    • The New Neighbors
    • Trading Posts


    Musée Huron-Wendat, Trading Ideas Virtual Collections
    • The characteristics of the occupied territory
    • The political structure
    • The Housing, Food, and Lifestyle
    • Clothes
    • The role of women and men's economic activities
    For more information, 
    Visit:

    Monday, July 20, 2015

    Meeting (Last) Saturday on Ohio Hopewell Earthworks


    July, 17, 2015.
    TimesReporter.com has written a short article about Bruce Lombardo's recent lecture about the Hopewell Ceremonial Earthworks and their nomination towards UNESCO World Heritage protection. Mr. Bruce Lombardo is the director for the Heartland Earthworks Conservancy and a park ranger for Hopewell Culture National Historical Park.

    "The sites are not just random structures but ceremonial centers characterized by a variety of large earthwork constructions that feature precise geometric shapes and standard units of measure. Also significant is the fact that the mounds contain extensive ritual deposits of finely crafted artifacts. If the nomination is successful, it could mean a significant increase in tourism to Ohio including Coshocton County."

    To read the full articleclick here.

    For more information,
    Visit:

    Friday, July 17, 2015

    Serpent Mound Property Vandalized

    Serpent Mound Youtube Video Screenshot by Tim Anderson Jr.

    July, 10, 2015.
    Brad Lepper, of the Ohio History Connection, has written a brief post
    about the recent damage to the Serpent Mound site. Serpent Mound is on the United States' Tentative List for sites being considered for UNESCO World Heritage status. 

    "As some of you already may have heard, an act of vandalism took place at Serpent Mound in Adams County, Ohio over the July Fourth weekend.

    This appears to have been a random act of vandalism that, luckily, caused minimal damage to the large, conical Adena mound and some of the surrounding grounds. Serpent Mound itself was not harmed."

    To read the full postclick here.

    For more information,
    Visit:

    Wednesday, July 15, 2015

    New UNESCO World Heritage Inscription -Beakje Historic Areas in the Republic of Korea

    Royal tombs at Neungsan-ri, part of the UNESCO World Heritage Baekje Historic Areas Site. Image Courtesy of Seo Heun-kang, the Baekje Historic Sites Nomination Office, and UNESCO World Heritage.
    Royal tombs at Neungsan-ri, part of the UNESCO World Heritage Baekje Historic Areas Site.
    Image Courtesy of Seo Heun-kang, the Baekje Historic Sites Nomination Office,
    and UNESCO World Heritage.
    July 4, 2015.
    The World Heritage Committee has recently approved the inscription of the Baekje Historic Areas in the Republic of Korea for UNESCO World Heritage status. Part of the inscription includes the Royal tombs at Neungsan-ri, "Six tombs formulate two rows with three mounds per row, while one tomb is situated 50m away, to the north from of the six tombs."*

    "Located in the mountainous mid-western region of the Republic of Korea, this property [the Baekje Historic Areas] comprises eight archaeological sites dating from 475 to 660 CE, including the Gongsanseong fortress and royal tombs at Songsan-ri related to the capital, Ungjin (present day Gongju), the Busosanseong Fortress and Gwanbuk-ri administrative buildings, and the Naseong city wall related to the capital, Sabi (now Buyeo), the royal palace at Wanggung-ri and the Mireuksa Temple in Iksan related to the secondary Sabi capital. Together, these sites represent the later period of the Baekje Kingdom – one of the three earliest kingdoms on the Korean peninsula (18 BCE to 660 CE) - during which time they were at the crossroads of considerable technological, religious (Buddhist), cultural and artistic exchanges between the ancient East Asian kingdoms in Korea, China and Japan."



    For More Information,
    Visit:

    Tuesday, July 14, 2015

    Jobs for Students with the National Park Service

    National Park Service Jobs for Students.

    The National Park Service has thousands of opportunities
     for high-school, college, and graduate students to work!

    Many are locally filled, so make sure to contact parks directly;
     but others are advertised and filled on a national level.


    Stipend amounts, contact information, and partner organizations 
    can be found in the link above.

    Geoscientists-in-the-Parks Internships
    • Undergraduate or graduate students, recent graduates
    • Primarily summer internships, but some are in the fall/winter or year-round
    • Geoscience field and office based positions doing research, inventory and monitoring, interpretation and education projects
    Mosaics in Science Internships
    • Undergraduate or graduate students
    • Focus on hiring students under-represented in natural resource disciplines
    • Summer, includes a career workshop in Washington DC in August
    • Natural resource sciences - field and office based positions doing research, inventory and monitoring, interpretation and education projects
    Student Conservation Association
    • High school students and young adults
    • Year-round or summer
    • Interest areas: all
    Public Land Corps
    • Ages 16-26
    • Summer
    • Interest areas: all
    Youth Conservation Corps
    • Ages 15-18
    • Summer 8-10 weeks non-residential
      • except at Yellowstone and Yosemite
    • Interest areas: conservation work projects and environmental education programs
    Pathways for Students and Recent Graduates
    • Current students seeking degrees or certificates from accredited institutions 
      • i.e. high schools; vocational and technical schools; and associate, bachelor, graduate, or professional schools.
    • Recent graduates
    • Year-round or summer
    • Interest areas: All
    National Park Business Plan and Consulting Internships
    • Graduate students (MBA, MPA, MPP, environmental and/or public lands management)
    • Summer
    • Interest areas: management consulting, park management, strategic and operational planning, commercial services, public-private partnerships
    Historic Preservation Training Internships
    • Undergraduate and graduate students
    • Year-round or summer
    • Interest areas: historians, archaeologists, architects, curators, planners, and archivists
    Cultural Resources Diversity Internships
    • Diverse undergraduate and graduate students
    • Summer
    • Interest areas: historic preservation and cultural resources
    Historic Sites and Structures Documentation Internships
    • Undergraduate or graduate students
    • Summer
    • On-site field work and preparation of measured and interpretive drawings and written historical reports
    • Interest areas: architecture, landscape architecture, engineering, history
    Maritime Documentation Internship
    • Undergraduate or graduate students
    • Summer
    • On-site field work and preparation of measured and interpretive drawings and written historical reports
    • Interest areas architecture, engineering, or history, maritime preservation
    Sally Kress Tompkins Fellowship
    • Graduate student in architectural history or related fields
    • Summer
    • Interest area: research

    U.S. National Park Service*
    *The list below is not comprehensive.
      • Ohio Parks
        • Fallen Timbers Battlefield and Fort Miamis
          • "The Battle of Fallen Timbers was the culminating event that demonstrated the tenacity of the American people in their quest for western expansion and the struggle for dominance in the Old Northwest Territory. The events resulted in the dispossession of American Indian tribes and a loss of colonial territory for the British military and settlers."
        • Hopewell Culture
          • "Earthen mounds and embankments forming huge geometric enclosures grace the landscape of the Ohio River Valley. These monumental structures were built by Native American hands almost 2,000 years ago. Hopewellian people gathered at these earthworks for feasts, funerals and rites of passage. Come learn about these sacred spaces and reflect upon the lives of these American Indians."
      • Illinois Parks
        • Lewis & Clark
          • "Between May 1804 and September 1806, 31 men, one woman, and a baby traveled from the plains of the Midwest to the shores of the Pacific Ocean. They called themselves the Corps of Discovery. In their search for a water route to the Pacific Ocean, they opened a window into the west for the young United States."
        • Trail of Tears
          • "Remember and commemorate the survival of the Cherokee people, forcefully removed from their homelands in Georgia, Alabama, and Tennessee to live in Indian Territory, now Oklahoma. They traveled by foot, horse, wagon, or steamboat in 1838-1839."
      • Indiana Parks
      • Kentucky Parks
        • Cumberland Gap
          • "At Cumberland Gap, the first great gateway to the west, follow the buffalo, the Native American, the longhunter, the pioneer... all traveled this route through the mountains into the wilderness of Kentucky. Modern day explorers and travelers stand in awe at this great gateway and the many miles of trails and scenic features found in the park."
        • Mammoth Cave
          • "Mammoth Cave National Park preserves the cave system and a part of the Green River valley and hilly country of south central Kentucky. This is the world's longest known cave system, with more than 400 miles explored. Early guide Stephen Bishop called the cave a "grand, gloomy and peculiar place," but its vast chambers and complex labyrinths have earned its name - Mammoth."
        • Trail of Tears
          • "Remember and commemorate the survival of the Cherokee people, forcefully removed from their homelands in Georgia, Alabama, and Tennessee to live in Indian Territory, now Oklahoma. They traveled by foot, horse, wagon, or steamboat in 1838-1839."
      • Michigan Parks
        • Keweenaw
          • "From 7,000 years ago to the 1900s people mined Keweenaw copper. Native peoples made copper into tools and trade items. Investors and immigrants arrived in the 1800s in a great mineral rush, developing thriving industries and cosmopolitan communities. Though the mines have since closed, their mark is still visible on the land and people."
        • River Raisin
          • "River Raisin National Battlefield Park preserves, commemorates, and interprets the January 1813 battles of the War of 1812 and their aftermath in Monroe and Wayne counties in SE Michigan. The Battle resulted in the greatest victory for Tecumseh’s American Indian confederation and the greatest defeat for the U.S. The resulting rally cry “Remember the Raisin” spurred support for the rest of the war."
      • Pennsylvania Parks
        • Captain John Smith Chesapeake
          • "Four hundred years ago Englishman John Smith and a small crew of adventurers set out in an open boat to explore the Chesapeake Bay. Between 1607 and 1609 Smith and his crew mapped nearly 3,000 miles of the Bay and rivers and documented American Indian communities. Smith’s map and journals are a remarkable record of the 17th-century Chesapeake. Come join the adventure on the Chesapeake Bay!"
        • Fort Necessity
          • "The battle at Fort Necessity in the summer of 1754 was the opening action of the French and Indian War. This war was a clash of British, French and American Indian cultures. It ended with the removal of French power from North America. The stage was set for the American Revolution."
      • West Virginia Parks
      • Tennessee Parks
        • Cumberland Gap
          • "At Cumberland Gap, the first great gateway to the west, follow the buffalo, the Native American, the longhunter, the pioneer... all traveled this route through the mountains into the wilderness of Kentucky. Modern day explorers and travelers stand in awe at this great gateway and the many miles of trails and scenic features found in the park."
        • Natchez Trace
          • "The Natchez Trace Parkway is a 444-mile drive through exceptional scenery and 10,000 years of North American history. Used by American Indians, "Kaintucks," settlers, and future presidents, the Old Trace played an important role in American history. Today, visitors can enjoy not only a scenic drive but also hiking, biking, horseback riding, and camping."
        • Trail of Tears
          • "Remember and commemorate the survival of the Cherokee people, forcefully removed from their homelands in Georgia, Alabama, and Tennessee to live in Indian Territory, now Oklahoma. They traveled by foot, horse, wagon, or steamboat in 1838-1839."