Wednesday, April 1, 2015

City of the Moon

Archaeology Magazine March/April 2015. City of the Moon. Mike Toner. Image Courtesy of Archaeology Magazine.

March/April 2015.
Mike Toner, of Archaeology Magazine, has written an interesting and informative article about the recent conclusions made about Cahokia's astronomical alignments to the moon. Cahokia is an ancient Native American metropolis which reached its height around A.D. 1100-1200. Dr. Bill Romain, one of our research associates, was quoted in the article citing Emerald Mound's similarity to earlier Hopewell Culture (100 B.C.- A.D. 400) sites like that of the Newark Earthworks.


"Recent excavations suggest that these earthworks, located near present-day Lebanon, Illinois, and known today as Emerald Mound, are one of several sites on the fringes of the ancient city of Cahokia that have a distinctly lunar orientation. It’s a discovery that suggests to some archaeologists that America’s premier prehistoric center may have had, or may have even begun with, a lunar cult."

To read the full article, subscription to Archaeology magazine is required. 
OSU students can view the article through the EBSCO database (link below).

For more information,
Visit:
*Link provided requires a sign in to EBSCO Host database
Ohio State University students can use their student log-in to access the database
 through the university's library pagehere.

Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Illinois' Cultural and Natural History: Native American Module

museumlinkIllinois. Native Americans Module
"In this MuseumLink module, you can explore Native American life in Illinois. To the best of our knowledge, Native Americans first arrived in Illinois more than 12,000 years ago. They were the only people in Illinois until French explorers arrived in the late 1600s. What was Native American life like 12,000 years ago? How has it changed? Answers to these questions, and many others, may be found by navigating back in time. All you need for this trip is curiosity."

Paths to the Past

Telling Time
Relative vs. Absolute Dating Methods.

What Do You Know About Native American History?
Debunking common stereotypes.

Prehistoric
Clovis points, Kimmswick, Missouri (left)and St. Clair County, Illinois (right). Image Courtesy of museumlinkIllinois.
Clovis points, Kimmswick, Missouri (left)and St. Clair County, Illinois (right).
Image Courtesy of museumlinkIllinois.
  • Paleoindian
    • Identity
    • Environment
      • Climate
      • Plants
      • Animals
    • Economy
      • Clothing
      • Food
      • Settlement
      • Trade
    • Technology
      • Tools & Utensils
      • Containers
      • Weapons
      • Shelter
      • Transportation
    • Society
    • Beliefs
    • Prehistoric sandal from Salts Cave, Kentucky. (ISM RoI 16, p. 28). Image Courtesy of museumlinkIllinois.
      Prehistoric sandal from Salts Cave, Kentucky. (ISM RoI 16, p. 28).
       Image Courtesy of museumlinkIllinois.
    • Archaeological Sites
  • Archaic
    • Identity
    • Environment
      • Climate
      • Plants
      • Animals
    • Economy
      • Clothing
      • Food
      • Settlement
      • Trade
    • Technology
      • Shelter
      • Tools & Utensils
      • Containers
      • Weapons
      • Transportation
    • Society
    • Beliefs
    • Archaeological Sites
Map of Illinois showing locations of Woodland sites. Image Courtesy of museumlinkIllinois.
Map of Illinois showing locations of Woodland sites.
Image Courtesy of museumlinkIllinois.
  • Woodland
    • Identity
    • Environment
      • Climate
      • Plants
      • Animals
    • Economy
      • Clothing
      • Food
      • Settlement
      • Trade
    • Technology
      • Shelter
      • Tools & Utensils
      • Containers
      • Weapons
    • Society
    • Beliefs
    • Archaeological Sites
Close-up of wood charcoal from a 8,500 year old campfire. Partially burned bits of plant material such as wood, seeds, and nutshell provide evidence of past environments and the types of plants used by people. Image Courtesy of museumlinkIllinois.
Close-up of wood charcoal from a 8,500 year old campfire.
Partially burned bits of plant material such as wood, seeds, and nutshell
provide evidence of past environments and the types of plants used by people.
Image Courtesy of museumlinkIllinois.

  • Mississippian
    • Identity
    • Environment
      • Climate
      • Plants
      • Animals
    • Economy
      • Clothin
      • Food
      • Settlement
      • Trade
    • Technology

    • Society
    • Beliefs
    • Archaeological Sites
Artist's illustration of an attack on a Protohistoric Oneota village.    Residents of the Morton site in Fulton County were subjected to raids periodically. The reasons for conflict are not clear. Image Courtesy of museumlinkIllinois.
Artist's illustration of an attack on a Protohistoric Oneota village.
Residents of the Morton site in Fulton County
were subjected to raids periodically. The reasons for conflict are not clear.
Image Courtesy of museumlinkIllinois.

  • Late Prehistoric
    • Identity
    • Environment
      • Climate
      • Plants
      • Animals
    • Economy
      • Clothing
      • Food
      • Settlement
      • Trade
    • Technology
      • Shelter
      • Tools & Utensils
      • Containers
      • Weapons
      • Transportation
    • Society
    • Beliefs
    • Archaeological Sites
  • Glossary
  • Activities and Resources
    • Pictionary with the Past
    • Mississippian Regalia
    • Mississippian Gorget
    • Pottery-making Methods
    • Falcon Dancer Mask
    • Additional Readings
      • Culture History
      • Regional Studies
      • Additional Readings
  • Teacher Orientation
    • Scope of the Module
    • Objectives
    • Reading Level
    • Resources for Teachers
    • Navigation
    • Content

Historic
Detail from "Carte de la Louisiane et du cours du Mississipi" (map by Guillaume Delisle, 1718) "Our Illinois [Indians] inhabit a very pleasant country. . . . the great rivers which water it, the vast and dense forests, the delightful prairies, the hills covered with very thick woods, --all these features make a charming variety." (Gabriel Marest, 1712). Image Courtesy of museumlinkIllinois.
Detail from "Carte de la Louisiane et du cours du Mississipi"
(map by Guillaume Delisle, 1718)
 "Our Illinois [Indians] inhabit a very pleasant country. . . .
the great rivers which water it, the vast and dense forests,
 the delightful prairies, the hills covered with very thick woods,
--all these features make a charming variety."
(Gabriel Marest, 1712). Image Courtesy of museumlinkIllinois.

"To paraphrase Mark Twain, rumors of our extinction are greatly exaggerated. Tribal members are active in promoting economic development, cultural and historical preservation, education, and health care programs for tribal members and other Indian people." (Steve Kinder, Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma, 1999). Image Courtesy of museumlinkIllinois.
"To paraphrase Mark Twain, rumors of our extinction are greatly exaggerated.
Tribal members are active in promoting economic development,
cultural and historical preservation, education,
and health care programs for tribal members and other Indian people."
(Steve Kinder, Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma, 1999).
Image Courtesy of museumlinkIllinois.
  • The Illinois Indians
    • Identity
      • Language
      • Territory
      • Appearance
    • Economy
      • Food
      • Settlements
      • Trade
      • Division of Labor
    • Technology
      • Houses
      • Tools and Utensils
      • Containers
      • Weapons
      • Transportation
      • European Trade
    • Society
      • Family
      • Leaders
      • Warfare
      • Social Status
      • Recreation
      • Neighbors
    • Beliefs
      • Religion
      • Calumet
      • Health
      • Death
      • Folklore
    • Art and Music
      • Art
      • Music
    • History
      • European Contact
      • Exploration
      • Fur Trade
      • The Illinois Decline
      • The Illinois Today
    • Archaeology
      • Illinois Villages
      • Zimmerman Site
      • Starved Rock Site
      • River L'Abbe Mission
      • Waterman Site
      • Ancestors
    • How Do We Know?
      • Written Records
      • Archaeology
  • Glossary
  • Activities and Resources
    • Comparison of Political Life
    • Dye Plants
    • Interview with Native American Teen
    • Movie of Native American Teen Dancing
    • Model Wigwam
    • Plum-stone Dice Game
    • Predicting the Past
    • Someone's in the Kitchen
      • Native American Recipes
    • BSA Indian Lore Merit Badge
    • Additional Readings
      • Sorted by section
      • Alphabetical bibliography
      • Websites of Interest
  • Teacher Orientation
    • Objectives of the Module
    • Reading Level
    • Resources for Teachers
    • Navigation
    • Content

For more information,
Visit:

Monday, March 30, 2015

Meet Native America: Natalie Standingontherock Proctor, Tribal Chairwoman, Wild Turkey Clan, Cedarville Band of Piscataway Conoy

Meet Native American. The National Museum of the American Indian.

"In the interview series Meet Native America, the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian invites tribal leaders, cultural figures, and other interesting and accomplished Native individuals to introduce themselves and say a little about their lives and work. Together, their responses illustrate the diversity of the indigenous communities of the Western Hemisphere, as well as their shared concerns, and offer insights beyond what’s in the news to the ideas and experiences of Native peoples today." 
-Dennis Zotigh, NMAI 

Natalie StandingontherockProctor, tribal chairwoman, Wild Turkey Clan, Cedarville Band of Piscataway Conoy. Annapolis, Maryland, January 2012. Image Courtesy of the National Museum of the American Indian's Blog.
Natalie StandingontherockProctor, tribal chairwoman,
Wild Turkey Clan, Cedarville Band of Piscataway Conoy.
Annapolis, Maryland, January 2012.
Image Courtesy of the National Museum of the American Indian's Blog.


"Where is your community located? Where are your people originally from?

The Piscataway's original territory covered what became colonial Maryland, which included present-day Washington, D.C., parts of Virginia—Fairfax County, Loudon County, etc.—and West Virginia, and some of Pennsylvania. The majority of Piscataway people now live in Washington and the southern part of Maryland, in the counties of Prince George and Charles. "

Friday, March 27, 2015

National Park Service's Indigenous Cultural Landscape

Video Courtesy of the National Park Service.

National Park Service's American Indian Program Manager, Deanna Beacham, discusses how the National Park Service's initiative of Indigenous Cultural Landscape began and evolved from protecting lands in Executive Order 13007 into a "methodology and criteria for identifying and representing indigenous cultural landscapes for the purposes of conservation and interpretation"*.

"This construct recognizes and respects that Indian cultures lived within the context of their environment, although not in the stereotypical sense of “living in harmony with the environment.” American Indian peoples lived around major waterways within large, varied landscapes, with which they were intimately familiar. They used different parts of those landscapes in different ways: for food, medicine, and clothing procurement, for making tools and objects related to transportation and the household, for agriculture, and for settlements."
A Model for Conservation, Interpretation, and TourismGeorge Wright Society Conference on Parks,
 Protected Areas, and Cultural Sites, 2011.

For more information,
Visit:

Thursday, March 26, 2015

Meet Native America: Donald Wanatee, Council Member, Sac and Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa

Meet Native American. The National Museum of the American Indian.

"In the interview series Meet Native America, the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian invites tribal leaders, cultural figures, and other interesting and accomplished Native individuals to introduce themselves and say a little about their lives and work. Together, their responses illustrate the diversity of the indigenous communities of the Western Hemisphere, as well as their shared concerns, and offer insights beyond what’s in the news to the ideas and experiences of Native peoples today." 
-Dennis Zotigh, NMAI 

Donald Wanatee, Sac & Fox Tribal Council member. Photo courtesy of the Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa/Meskwaki and the National Museum of the American Indian's Blog.
Donald Wanatee, Sac & Fox Tribal Council member. Photo courtesy of the Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa/Meskwaki and the National Museum of the American Indian's Blog.
"Where is your community located? Where are your people originally from?

The Sac and Fox—the Meskwaki—originated along the St. Lawrence in southern Canada, near Montreal and Three Rivers. To get here I surmise was quite a march for our people. After running around from government troops, we settled in Tama County, Iowa. We, the tribe, in the year 1857 bought 80 acres of land along the Iowa River, which we eventually expanded to 10,000 acres, thus increasing the legitimacy of our land holdings and governmental structure. A so-called "self-governing" tribe, we should have been given instruction in "self-government." Receiving no guidance from federal lawmakers, we stand."

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

New Statehouse Gavels Made from Newark Earthworks Tree

"Miami Tribe of Oklahoma member Jody Gamble made the small ceremonial gavels
using wood from a North American red oak tree believed to have been at least 225 years old.
They were presented to the Ohio Legislature in honor of Statehood Day."
Image and Caption Courtesy of Miami University.
March, 4, 2015.
Emily Maddern, of the Newark Advocate, has written an interesting article about the recent gift of ceremonial gavels to the Ohio Legislature in celebration of Statehood Day
by the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma and the Ohio History Connection.

"George Ironstrack, a member of the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma, said the man who carved the gavel was honored to not only be involved in the project but to have the Ohio History Connection recognize Ohio is a part of the tribe’s homelands and what a powerful symbol the red oak tree was.
“Our people aren’t mound builders, but Ohio is the landscape that our people lived on and we traveled through,” Ironstrack said. “The tree kind of symbolizes the rootedness, the connectedness to a place for lots of different people who have called Ohio home over time and a shared desire to protect those places.” "

To read the full articleclick here.

For more information,
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Tuesday, March 24, 2015

myaamiaki iši meehtohseeniwiciki: How the Miami People Live

myaamiaki iši meehtohseeniwiciki: How the Miami People Live

"This website is one part of a grant awarded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services to the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma. It is intended to give a thorough review of the myaamiaki iši meehtohseeniwiciki exhibition that was housed at the Miami University Art Museum from September 16th to December 13th 2008. You will find a interactive walkthrough of the exhibit as it was, including close up images of most of the objects. Be sure to click the text on the walls for more information on the exhibit, as well as important quotes by Myaamia people. Visit the 'Auditorium' for videos of the opening events, sculpture dedication, and lecture series that happened during the exhibition's run.

Also featured on the website is a browsable list with pictures of each item, a slideshow of images from the opening events, and links to organizations related to this project."

eekootoonkia (Exhibit)
Adobe Flash walkthrough of the individual pieces and installation of the exhibit.

kaakisitoonkia (Preserved Objects)
Searchable by Objects and Quotes with descriptions, date, image, and loaning institution.

atakohkana (Links)

  • Loaning Institutions
    • University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology
    • The Lilly Library, Indiana University
    • Indiana Historical Society
    • Garst Museum
    • Tippecanoe County Historical Association
    • George Adams Gallery
    • Kansas City Museum
    • National Museum of the American Indian
    • Cranbrook Institute of Science
    • Wabash County Historical Museum
    • Detroit Institute of Arts
    • Darke County Park District
    • Library of Congress
    • Miami University
    • Atwater Kent Museum of Philadelphia
    • Chicago History Museum
    • Detroit Historical Society
For More Information,
Visit:

Monday, March 23, 2015

Meet Native America: Scott N. BigHorse, Assistant Principal Chief, Osage Nation

Meet Native American. The National Museum of the American Indian.

"In the interview series Meet Native America, the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian invites tribal leaders, cultural figures, and other interesting and accomplished Native individuals to introduce themselves and say a little about their lives and work. Together, their responses illustrate the diversity of the indigenous communities of the Western Hemisphere, as well as their shared concerns, and offer insights beyond what’s in the news to the ideas and experiences of Native peoples today." 
-Dennis Zotigh, NMAI 


Assistant Principal Chief Scott N. BigHorse. Photo courtesy of the Osage Nation and the National Museum of American Indian's Blog.
Assistant Principal Chief Scott N. BigHorse.
Photo courtesy of the Osage Nation and the National Museum of American Indian's Blog.
"Where is your nation located?
Wa Zha Zhe (Osage), Oklahoma. Wa ka Ko LiN (Pawhuska) is the capital.

Where was your tribe originally from?
The Ohio Valley to the St. Louis, Missouri, area."

Friday, March 20, 2015

Canadian First Nations Seek to Protect Forest Homeland

February, 24, 2015.
Edwin Dobb, of National Geographic, has written an informative article about the recent efforts of several First Nations of Canda to preserve and protect their ancestral land and are part of the "truth and reconcilliation process" with Canada's government.

"But becoming part of a global campaign wasn't on the minds of Sophia Rabliauskas and other Poplar River leaders when they started trying to reclaim the place they simply call the "bush."

Their aim was as simple as it was bold—to become the guardians of their traditional territory. To that end they created a land management and conservation plan while recruiting their First Nations neighbors to join them in what has been a decades-long endeavor.

Eventually, in 2011, the provincial government relented, giving the Poplar River First Nation control over an area known as the Poplar/Nanowin Rivers Park Reserve.

The reserve, home to most of the band's 1,700 members, covers only 3,800 acres, but the Poplar River First Nation's historic territory stretches eastward from the lake almost to the Ontario border—about two million acres of lowland forest and bog, or muskeg, that the provincial government officially considered unoccupied as recently as the 1990s."

To read the full articleclick here.

For more information,
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Thursday, March 19, 2015

Meet Native America: Cara Cowan Watts, Cherokee Nation Tribal Council

Meet Native American. The National Museum of the American Indian.

"In the interview series Meet Native America, the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian invites tribal leaders, cultural figures, and other interesting and accomplished Native individuals to introduce themselves and say a little about their lives and work. Together, their responses illustrate the diversity of the indigenous communities of the Western Hemisphere, as well as their shared concerns, and offer insights beyond what’s in the news to the ideas and experiences of Native peoples today." 
-Dennis Zotigh, NMAI 


Cara Cowan Watts (right) and Christy Kingfisher at the Cherokee National Holiday Powwow. Talequah, Oklahoma, 2012. Image Courtesy of Cara Cowan Watts and the National Museum of the American Indian's Blog.
Cara Cowan Watts (right) and Christy Kingfisher at the Cherokee National Holiday Powwow. Talequah, Oklahoma, 2012. Image Courtesy of Cara Cowan Watts and the National Museum of the American Indian's Blog.
"Where is your nation located? 

The Cherokee Nation is located in all or part of 14 counties in northeastern Oklahoma, and our tribal jurisdiction (which is not a reservation) is approximately 7,000 square miles. I live in Rogers County. The tribe’s capital is Tahlequah, Oklahoma, which is in Cherokee County and more than one hour from Rogers County. All of Cherokee, Sequoyah, Adair, Nowata, Craig, and Mayes counties are within the Cherokee Nation, and a portion of Delaware, Rogers, Ottawa, McIntosh, Muskogee, Tulsa, Wagoner and Washington counties are within the Cherokee Nation.

Where was your nation originally from?

Cherokee lands included parts of West Virginia, Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina. Today, only three Cherokee governments remain: the Cherokee Nation, Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, and United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians. "