Friday, January 23, 2015

Pe'Sla Purchase Guarantees Sacred Land Will Be Used for Ceremonies

Native American tribes have finalized the purchase of 437 acres of land north of Deerfield Lake  that is part of the property known as Pe'Sla. The land purchase adds to the 1,900 acres  purchased in 2012. Pe'sla is a sacred area considered by the Lakota  as the "center and heart of everything."  Image is Courtesy of The Rapid City Journal.
Native American tribes have finalized the purchase of 437 acres of land north of Deerfield Lake
that is part of the property known as Pe'Sla. The land purchase adds to the 1,900 acres
purchased in 2012. Pe'sla is a sacred area considered by the Lakota
as the "center and heart of everything."
 Image is Courtesy of The Rapid City Journal.
December 21, 2014.
Christina Rose,of Indian Country Today, has written a brief article about the recent purchase of the rest of Pe'Sla.

"Iron Eyes attended an inter-tribal meeting at the Mother Butler Center, in Rapid City, South Dakota to hear what is next for the sacred landscape.“This is where it’s at. We can now go to our sacred site under our own authority,” he said. “Everything happened the way it was supposed to happen.” ... Pe’ Sla is related to the Lakota creation and is the site for annual ceremonies. Historically, it has hosted many village gatherings. Now, with the land back in the hands of the Oceti Sakowin, there are many more to come and no fear that they will ever be stopped."

To read the full article/postclick here.

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Thursday, January 15, 2015

History Department Grants for Research & Study Abroad

Department of History
Applications and supporting materials must be submitted to the History Department 
no later than February 20, 2015.

Honors Thesis Research

"The History Department will consider applications from students in any geographical, chronological, or thematic subfield of the historical discipline. Our overriding criteria in selecting grant recipients will be the quality of the applicant’s research project, the feasibility of the research proposed, and the appropriateness of the activities and materials for which funding is requested.

The History Department anticipates making individual awards ranging from a minimum of $750 to a maximum of $5,000 each. Amounts requested may vary widely depending on the needs of particular research projects. Projects requiring visits to research collections abroad, for example, will almost certainly require larger outlays of funds than projects that can be researched entirely in Columbus or even within the U.S."


"The History Department invites applications from History majors who have applied to existing study abroad programs approved by the Office of International Affairs. These grants are intended to supplement funding that the student has already received to attend the study abroad program in question. They may also be used as the major or sole source of funding if funding cannot be obtained from the study abroad program itself or from other sources.

The History Department will consider applications from students applying to recognized study abroad programs anywhere in the world, from Canada to Latin America, Western Europe, Eastern Europe (including Russia), the Middle East, Africa, South Asia, East Asia, and Australia/New Zealand. The History Department will give preference to programs that (a) provide training in a language related to the student’s program of study and/or career goals, and/or (b) contain a historical component."


"The Department of History offers several scholarships for undergraduate students on the basis of merit and financial need. As you prepare the applications, please read the attached materials carefully and follow the instructions as closely as possible. Electronic submission of applications and letters of nomination/recommendation is encouraged."

For more information, click here.

Remember 
Undergraduate Research Scholar Applications
 are awarded each month!
The next application deadline is February 1st.

"Are you interested in pursuing a faculty-supervised research or creative activity? 
If so, you may apply to be selected as an Undergraduate Research Scholar and receive $1000* to embark on your research or creative adventure. The Office of Undergraduate Education, in partnership with the Undergraduate Research Office, designates up to 300 first-time Undergraduate Research Scholars every year."

For more information, click here.

Undergraduate Research Office

Wednesday, January 14, 2015

Blood from Stones Casts Doubt on Importance of Megafauna for Paleoindians

January 2, 2015.
Brad Lepper, of the Ohio History Connection Archaeology Blog, has written a brief post about a recent study published in Legacy which suggests that Paleoindians' diet is not as well understood as previously thought.

"The Paleoindian period has a special fascination because of its extreme antiquity. But because of that antiquity it has been difficult to get a clear picture of the ways of life of these Ice Age peoples. New technologies, such as blood residue analysis, are adding details, but clearly we still have a lot to learn."

To read the full post, click here.

For more information, 
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Tuesday, January 13, 2015

Myaamionki Earth & Sky Curriculum


"Based on three years of workshops, camps, field trips, and lectures 
supported by the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma and NASA,
 this curriculum explores the Earth and Sky from a Myaamia perspective."

ašiihkiwi neehi kiišikwi | Earth and Sky
Introduction

  • Index
  • Young Girl and Squirrel
  • Activity 1 Look Up, Down, and All Around

Earth
  • Mole and Rock
  • Activity 2 How the Sun Moves
  • Activity 3 Let's Go for a Walk
  • Activity 4 Rocks
  • Seven Pillars
  • Emerging Land
  • The Confluence of the Maumee
  • Forks of the Wabash
  • Kansas: Coal and Oil
  • Oklahoma: Lead
  • Miami University










Sky
  • Firefly and Moon
  • Activity 5 What Is the Weather?
  • Activity 6 How Far Has the Sun Come?
  • Activity 7 The Moon Grows
  • Activity 8 Miami Calendar
  • Activity 9 Miami Sky
  • Serpent Mound
  • Mars Rock
Sharing Stories
  • Activity 10 Draw All Sorts of Things from the Earth and Sky
  • Activity 11 Write!





  • Stellarium
    • Myaamia Sky Culture
  • ašiihkiwi neehi kiišikwi Google Maps
  • Earth and Sky Curriculum Scientific Standards Chart
For more information,
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Monday, January 12, 2015

Meet Native America: Christina Danforth, Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin

Meet Native American. The National Museum of the American Indian.

"In the interview series Meet Native America, the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian invites tribal leaders, cultural figures, and other interesting and accomplished Native individuals to introduce themselves and say a little about their lives and work. Together, their responses illustrate the diversity of the indigenous communities of the Western Hemisphere, as well as their shared concerns, and offer insights beyond what’s in the news to the ideas and experiences of Native peoples today." 
-Dennis Zotigh, NMAI 

Chairwoman Cristina Danforth, Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin. Image Courtesy of The National Museum of American Indian's Blog
Chairwoman Cristina Danforth, Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin.
Image Courtesy of The National Museum of American Indian's Blog.


"Where is the Oneida Tribe located?

Our tribe is located in northeast Wisconsin and is adjacent to the city of Green Bay. Our original reservation boundaries of 1838 make up 65,400 acres that are home to five municipal governments and two county governments.

Where was your tribe originally from?

The process of settlement into what is now known as the state of Wisconsin (statehood, 1848) began with the United States Treaty with the Menominee of 1831, in which the federal government ceded land to the New York Indians. The treaty was agreed to by the Menominee Indian people and the U.S. president, with assistance from the Indian agent of Green Bay. The 1831 Menominee Treaty was furthered by the U.S Treaty with the Oneida in 1838. That treaty, also known as the Buffalo Creek Treaty, acknowledges the Oneida Indians and our ancestral ties to New York state."

Thursday, January 8, 2015

Hopewell Moon

January 5, 2014.
Brad Lepper, of the Ohio History Connection Archaeology Blog, has written a brief introductory post for an informative post about the Minor Lunar Standstill astronomical alignment 
of the Newark Earthworks  written by Bob Neinast of Ahcuah.

"The main axis of the Octagon (with its attached circle) is perfectly aligned with the Major Lunar Standstill moonrise. That happened a little less than 9 years ago, in 2006.
But if you've been paying attention, you’ll realize that means that we are approaching the Minor Lunar Standstill. And we are. The full Minor Lunar Standstill occurs in October, but it is a Standstill. That means that things are really close even right now.
And that means that we can go to the Great Circle and observe it, which is what I did on New Year’s Eve. The moon ought to rise through the opening of the Great Circle during the Minor Lunar Standstill."

To read the full post, click here.

For more information,
Visit:

Monday, January 5, 2015

6,000 Year Old Stonehenge Encampment Find Sparks Tunnel Row

Image Courtesy of AP and The Telegraph.co.uk.
Stonehenge.
Image Courtesy of AP and The Telegraph.
December 19, 2014.
Sarah Knapton, of The Telegraph, has written a short article about the recent discovery of a Mesolithic campsite within the boundaries of the Stonehenge World Heritage site which would be destroyed by the proposed AO3 tunnel.

"Charcoal dug up from the ‘Blick Mead’ encampment, a mile and a half from Stonehenge, dates from around 4,000 BC. It is thought the site was originally occupied by hunter gatherers returning to Britain after the Ice Age, when the country was still connected to the continent.
Experts say the discovery could re-write history in prehistoric Britain."

To read the full article,  click here.

December 19, 2014.
"The dig has also unearthed evidence of possible structures in the only untouched Mesolithic landscape in the Stonehenge World Heritage Site.
There is also evidence of feasting, including burnt flints and remains of giant bulls, called aurochs, eaten by early hunter gatherers, as well as tools."

To read the full article, click here.

For more information,
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Monday, December 29, 2014

11 Things You Should Know About Mohawks

Ironworkers of Local 440. "The Mohawk ironworkers span six generations  building America's skyscrapers for 120 years."  Image Courtesy of Indian Country Today.
Ironworkers of Local 440. "The Mohawk ironworkers span six generations
building America's skyscrapers for 120 years."
Image Courtesy of Indian Country Today.
December 11, 2014.
Vincent Shilling, a correspondent for Indian Country Today, has written a brief article about eleven facts about the Mohawk which may not be commonly known.

"To throw a bit more confusion into the fire, Mohawk author and historian Darren Bonaparte says Mohawk isn’t a Mohawk word, because “M isn’t one of our letters.” Bonaparte says the hairstyle was originally Huron, yet old movies and Mohawk warrior paratroopers shaving their heads on D-Day inspired the namesake attached to the haircut."

To read the full article, click here.

For more information,
Visit:
This list is by no means complete and links are, as always, subject to change.

Friday, December 26, 2014

Peru Plans to Charge Greenpeace Activists for Damage to Nazca Lines

Greenpeace's sign at the UNESCO World Heritage site, the Nazca Lines.  Image Courtesy of Reuters, and Indian Country Today.com .
Greenpeace's sign at the UNESCO World Heritage site, the Nazca Lines.
Image Courtesy of Reuters, and Indian Country Today.com .
December 15, 2014.
William Neuman, of The New York Times, has written a brief article about the damage to the Nazca Lines, an UNESCO World Heritage site, from Greenpeace volunteers.

"Officials said that the activists walking over the fragile desert ground left marks that cannot be removed. The Nazca Lines were created over 1,000 years ago, and include enormous figures of birds, mammals and geometric shapes etched into the earth."

To read the full article, click here.

"The Nazca figures were drawn between 500 BC and 500 AD by removing a thin patina of dark rocks covering light sand. This is one of the driest regions of the world, and the lack of water and wind has helped preserve the lines for centuries.

But they're still quite fragile. "When you step on it, you simply break the patina and expose the bottom surface," said Peru's Deputy Culture Minister Luis Jaime Castillo . "How long does it take for nature….to again create a patina? Hundreds of years? Thousands of years? We really don't know." "
-PBS Newshour, io9.

For more information,
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Monday, December 22, 2014

Meet Native America: Vernon Miller, Chairman, Omaha Tribe

Meet Native American. The National Museum of the American Indian.

"In the interview series Meet Native America, the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian invites tribal leaders, cultural figures, and other interesting and accomplished Native individuals to introduce themselves and say a little about their lives and work. Together, their responses illustrate the diversity of the indigenous communities of the Western Hemisphere, as well as their shared concerns, and offer insights beyond what’s in the news to the ideas and experiences of Native peoples today." 
-Dennis Zotigh, NMAI 



Vernon Miller, chairman of the Omaha Tribe.
Image Courtesy of Jeff Liu & the National Museum of the American Indian's Blog.
"Where is the Omaha Tribe located?

Our reservation is located in northeast Nebraska and northwest Iowa. The Missouri River runs through our reservation.

Where was your tribe originally from?

The Omaha people migrated to the upper Missouri area and the Plains by the late 17th century from earlier locations in the Ohio River Valley. The Omaha speak a Siouan language of the Dhegihan branch, very similar to that spoken by the Ponca. The Ponca were part of the Omaha before splitting off into a separate tribe in the mid-18th century. We are related to Osage, Quapaw, and Kansa peoples, who also migrated west under pressure from the Iroquois in the Ohio Valley. "
To view the full interviewclick here.

The Omaha Tribe's website.