Thursday, September 18, 2014

Stonehenge 'Complete Circle' Evidence Found

Stonehenge with parch marks during July 2013.  Image Courtesy of English Heritage and BBC News.
Stonehenge with parch marks during July 2013.
Image Courtesy of English Heritage and BBC News.
August 30, 2014.
BBC News has written about recently discovered parch marks at Stonehenge, an UNESCO World Heritage Site. These parch marks seen during last July suggest the stone circle was once complete which is a new discovery for the site.

"Tim Daw, who spotted the parch marks, said: "I was standing on the public path looking at the grass near the stones and thinking that we needed to find a longer hosepipe to get the parched patches to green up... A sudden lightbulb moment in my head, and I remembered that the marks were where archaeologists had looked without success for signs that there had been stone holes, and that parch marks can signify them." "

To read the full article, click here.

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Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Be it resolved by the House of Representatives of the State of Ohio...


June 2014.

"Be it resolved by the House of Representatives of the State of Ohio (The Senate concurring):

WHEREAS, American Indians have made and continue to make significant contributions towards shaping Ohio into the great state that it is today. The ancient cultures built monumental earthworks in Ohio encoded with astronomical alignments that have captured the world's attention, and many of Ohio's geographic features and cities have historic Native American Indian names; and

WHEREAS, American Indians who have contributed to the rich history and culture of our state include the members of the ancient cultures now known as the Adena, Hopewell, and Fort Ancient, and historic tribes that include the Shawnee, Miami, Delaware, Potawatomi, Seneca, Wyandot, Peoria, and Ottawa; and

WHEREAS, American Indians have made an indelible mark on the landscape, history, and culture of Ohio. Today, many American Indians call Ohio "home," working and raising their families here; and

WHEREAS, American Indians living in Ohio can be justifiably proud of their rich heritage, spirituality, and traditions. It is important that they receive encouragement from the state's elected officials to continue teaching their culture to their children and sharing it with their fellow Ohioans; now therefore be it

RESOLVED, That we, the members of the 130th General Assembly of the State of Ohio, designate the fourth week of September as "American Indian Week," in conjunction with "American Indian Day" on the fourth Saturday of September, to honor the significant influence that American Indians have had on Ohio and to encourage the teaching and sharing of their culture; and be it further

RESOLVED, That the Clerk of the House of Representatives transmit duly authenticated copies of this resolution to the news media of Ohio."


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Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Earthworks Sites' Radiocarbon Dates -Databases

Cultural Resource Analysts, Inc.

"A total of 1919 radiocarbon dates for archaeological sites and objects in Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia has been compiled by the Council For West Virginia Archaeology. These data represent most radiocarbon dates available for the region up to August 1996. The database is presented in a tabular format in ascending order of radiocarbon age. The database includes site numbers, site names, components, time periods, lab numbers, radiocarbon age, sigma, calibrated age and references."
"the radiocarbon database represents many years of cooperation between professional and amateur archaeologists as well as universities, agencies and private consulting firms. It should be stressed that even though this is a final publication this database should be viewed as a working document that will be continuously updated and corrected…"

  • Alligator Mound, OH
  • Anderson Earthwork, IN
  • Armitage Mound, OH
  • Auvergne Mound, KY
  • Bagley Mound, OH
  • Bills Creek Mound, WV
  • Black Dog Mound, OH
  • Bob Evans Mound, OH
  • Byler/Buyler Mound, OH
  • Camargo Mound, KY
  • Carmargo Mound, KY
  • Clough Mound, OH
  • Connett Mound, OH
  • Consol Mound
  • Cotinga Mound, WV
  • Cowan Creek Mound, OH
  • Cresap Mound, WV
  • Daines Mound, OH
  • Dover Mound, KY
  • Drake Mound, KY
  • Earl DeLong Mound, OH
  • Ennis Mound, OH/WV?
  • Enos Holmes Mound, OH
  • Esch Mound, OH
  • Fairchance Mound, OH
  • Florence Mound, OH
  • Gaines Mound, KY
  • Galbreath Mound, OH
  • Gerlack Mound, OH
  • Glenford Fort Stone Mound, OH
  • Grave Creek Mound, WV
  • Hartman Mound, KY
  • Henderson Mound, OH
  • Hines Mound, OH
  • Hopewell Mound Group, OH
  • Ighram Mound, WV
  • James Chase Hambleton Mound, OH
  • James Star Mound, OH
  • Kern Effigy?, OH
  • Kirk Mound, WV
  • Kline Mound, OH
  • Kohl Mound, OH
  • LaMoreaux Mound, OH
  • Leslie Mound, WV
  • Liberty Earthworks/Edwin Harness Mound, OH
  • McCabe Mound, KY
  • McCoy Mound, OH
  • Miskimens/Maxwell Mound, OH
  • Morgan Stone Mound, KY
  • Mound City, OH
  • Murad Mound, WV
  • Nashport Mound, OH
  • Newark Works: Great Circle, OH
  • Newark Works: Octagon, OH
  • Newman Mound, WV
  • Oak Mound, WV
  • O.C. Voss Mound, OH
  • Phillips Mound
  • Phillip Smith Mound, OH
  • Philo Group, OH
  • Pollock Works, OH
  • Rock Riffle Run Mound, OH
  • Robbins Mound, KY
  • Russell Brown Mound
  • Rutledge Mound, OH
  • Sayler Park/Merk Mound, OH
  • Seip Earthworks, OH
  • Thruman DeLong Mound, OH
  • Todd Mound, OH
  • Toepfner Mound, OH
  • Tremper Mound, OH
  • Turk Mound
  • Twin Mounds, KY
  • Viney Branch Mound, KY
  • Waterworks Mound, OH
  • Wickliffe, KY
  • William H. Davis Mound, OH
  • William Schultz Mound, OH
  • Whittlesey Earthwork, OH
  • Wright Mound, KY
  • Yant Mound, OH
  • Young Mound, WV

Canadian Archaeological Radiocarbon Database compiled by Dr. Richard Morian, Canadian Museum of Civilization

"a compilation of radiocarbon measurements that indicate the ages of archaeological and vertebrate palaeontological sites in North America. During the 50 years since the method of radiocarbon dating was invented, archaeologists and palaeontologists have invested heavily in this method, acquiring tens of thousands of radiocarbon dates. These dates represent a substantial financial investment, but their potential for developing the chronology of archaeology and palaeontology remains under-utilized and in some respects misused. The dates are widely scattered in published and unpublished sources, and many have not been reported at all. Furthermore, the dates are not all created equal, as they represent the results of analytical methods and techniques that have evolved over a 50-year period."

  • Alligator Mound, OH
  • Armitage Mound, OH
  • Arthur James Mound, OH
  • Augustine Mound, New Brunswick, Canada 
  • Bills Creek Mound, WV
  • Black Dog Mound, OH
  • Bob Evans Mound, OH
  • Boven Earthworks, MI 
  • Byler/ Buyler Mound, OH
  • Carmargo Mound, KY
  • Clough Mound, OH
  • Connett Mound, OH
  • Cotinga Mound, WV
  • Cowan Creek Mound, OH
  • Cresap Mound, WV
  • Daines Mound, OH
  • Drake Mound, KY
  • Earl DeLong Mound, OH
  • Enos Holmes Mound, OH
  • Esch Mound, OH
  • Fidler Mounds, Manitoba, Canada 
  • Florence Mound, OH
  • Gaines Mound, KY
  • Galbreath Mound, OH
  • Gerlack Mound, OH
  • Glenford Fort Stone Mound, OH
  • Grave Creek Mound, WV
  • Hartman Mound, KY
  • Heath Mound, Manitoba, Canada 
  • Henderson Mound, OH
  • Hilltop Mounds, OH
  • Hines Mound, OH
  • Hopewell Mound Group, OH
  • Ighram Mound, WV
  • James Chase Hambleton Mound, OH
  • James Starr Mound, OH
  • Kern Effigy, OH 
  • Kirk Mound, WV
  • Kline Mound, OH
  • Kohl Mound, OH
  • Gaines Mound, KY
  • LaMoreaux Mound, OH
  • Lane Enclosure, IA
  • Leslie Mound, WV
  • LeVesconte Mound, Ontario, Canada
  • Liberty Earthworks/Edwin Harness Mound, OH
  • Linseman-Walters Earthwork, MI
  • Mikado Earthwork Enclosure, MI
  • Miskimens/Maxwell Mound, OH
  • McCabe Mound, KY
  • McCoy Mound, OH
  • Morgan Stone Mound, KY
  • Mound City Group, OH 
  • Murad Mound, WV
  • Nashport Mound, OH
  • Newark Works: Great Circle, OH 
  • Newark Works: Octagon, OH 
  • Newman Mound, WV
  • Oak Mound, WV
  • O.C. Voss Mound, OH
  • Phillip Smith Mound, OH
  • Philo Group, OH
  • Pollock Works, OH 
  • Prince Mound, Ontario, Canada 
  • Robbins Mound, KY
  • Riverview Mound, Manitoba, Canada 
  • Rix Mills Enclosure, OH
  • Rock Rifle Run Mound, OH
  • Rutledge Mound, OH
  • Sayler Park/ Merk Mound, OH
  • Seid Mound, OH
  • Seip Earthworks, OH
  • Serpent Mound, OH
  • Serpent Mounds, Ontario, Canada 
  • St. James Mound, Manitoba, Canada 
  • Star Mound, Manitoba, Canada 
  • Stott Mound, Manitoba, Canada 
  • Thurman DeLong Mound, OH
  • Todd Mound, OH
  • Toepfner Mound, OH
  • Tremper Mound, OH
  • Tsolum River Mound, British Columbia, Canada 
  • Turkey Creek Mound, WV
  • Twin Mounds, KY
  • Viney Branch Mound, KY
  • Waterworks Mound, OH
  • Watson Farm Mound, WV
  • William H. Davis Mound, OH
  • William Schultz Mound, OH
  • Willow Island Mound, WV
  • Welcome Mound, WV
  • Wickliffe, KY
  • Whittlesey Mound, OH
  • Whorley Earthwork, MI
  • Wright Mound, KY 
  • Yant Mound, OH
*But not limited to.

For more information about radiocarbon dating, 
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Wednesday, September 10, 2014

OSU Archaeological Field School in Dublin, OH


Ohio State University students are shown above in WOSU TV's documentary
 on Columbus Neighborhoods: Clintonville. 
April 2014.
The Ohio State University Department of Anthropology's archaeology field school teaches students  how to be responsible archaeologists in the field and how to discover history left behind on the land. The video above documents the students' efforts in cultural resource management before a potential road extension is constructed.

To view the full documentary, click here.

What is Cultural Resource Management?
"Cultural resource management (CRM) refers to the processes and procedures used to manage, preserve, protect, and conserve cultural resources in compliance with state and federal regulations. Each year a wealth of archaeological data are generated through CRM in efforts to prevent the loss of information from an untold number of archaeological sites, architecture, landscapes, and other cultural resources. A number of state and federal laws mandate CRM projects. These laws require identification and recording of cultural resources that are potentially eligible for inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places, before impact by construction projects funded or licensed by federal and/or state agencies."
- New York State Museum.

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Tuesday, September 9, 2014

Virtual First Ohians

Virtual First Ohians

This site represents an online exhibit of the Ohio History Connection including images, timelines, and videos representing a comprehensive overlook of Ohio's first residents.
*Note: Dates may vary around 100 years above and below given date for cultures prior to AD 1650 due to regional differences and margin of error in dating techniques. Dates are taken from the Ohio History Central Encyclopedia.

"In the Eastern United States, Indian cultures existing before the coming of the Europeans and their written language have been organized into four basic groupings: Paleoindian, Archaic, Woodland, and Late Prehistoric. These groups are defined by basic patterns of settlements, economy, and artifacts spread over a fairly large region. While the groups generally followed each other in time, they also overlapped somewhat."

Ohio History Connection

Friday, September 5, 2014

Illuminating the Treaties That Have Governed U.S. - Indian Relationships

In 1794, President Washington commissioned a wampum belt for the Canadaigua Treaty. Image Courtesy of Cliff Owen/AP Images and Smithsonian.com.
In 1794, President Washington commissioned a wampum belt for the Canadaigua Treaty.
Image Courtesy of Cliff Owen/AP Images and Smithsonian.com.
September 2014.
Smithsonian has written a brief new article summarizing some of the treaties between Native Nations and the United States.

"The so-called Calico Treaty, one of the earliest the U.S. entered into, is still in force: Every July, the Bureau of Indian Affairs dispatches what amounts to a square yard of cloth per tribal citizen to the tribes (except the Mohawks, because the U.S. has come to believe that no Mohawk leaders were present at the treaty’s signing)."

To read the full article, click here.

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What Lies Beneath Stonehenge

The huge bluestones each weigh between four and eight tons  and were brought to the site from North Wales, 170 miles away.  Photo Courtesy of Henrik Knudsen, English Heritage, and Smithsonian.com.
The huge bluestones each weigh between four and eight tons
and were brought to the site from North Wales, 170 miles away.
Photo Courtesy of Henrik Knudsen, English Heritage, and Smithsonian.com.
September 2014.
Smithsonian Magazine has published a thought-provoking article about new discoveries around Stonehenge, a famous UNESCO World Heritage site in England. Recent research has focused on placing Stonehenge within its landscape using new magnetic, radar, and geophysical data.

"Gaffney’s latest research effort, the Stonehenge Hidden Landscapes Project, is a four-year collaboration between a British team and the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Archaeological Prospection and Virtual Archaeology in Austria that has produced the first detailed underground survey of the area surrounding Stonehenge, totaling more than four square miles. The results are astonishing. The researchers have found buried evidence of more than 15 previously unknown or poorly understood late Neolithic monuments: henges, barrows, segmented ditches, pits. To Gaffney, these findings suggest a scale of activity around Stonehenge far beyond what was previously suspected."

To read the full article, click here.

For more information about Stonehenge, 
Magnetometers, Ground- Penetrating Radar, 
or World Heritage, Visit:

Thursday, September 4, 2014

Povert Point: Preservation of a Prehistoric World Heritage Site

Aerial Photo of Poverty Point.  Image Courtesy of Susan Guice and the NEH.
Aerial Photo of Poverty Point.
Image Courtesy of Susan Guice and the NEH.
August 7, 2014.
Ralph Canevali, of the National Endowment for the Humanities, has written an informative article about the history, preservation, and future of Poverty Point State Historic Site, located in northeastern Louisiana. Poverty Point was recently added to the UNESCO World Heritage List and marks the 22nd World Heritage site in the U.S.

"Poverty Point was part of a larger cultural complex of mound builders that extended throughout the lower Mississippi River valley. Despite excavations that have uncovered stone tools, pottery, and other artifacts at Poverty Point, relatively little is known about the people who built the mounds. They were not farmers, but rather subsisted through hunting, gathering, and fishing. However, they also obtained goods from as far afield as the southern Appalachians and the upper Midwest."

To read the full article, click here.

National Endowment for the Humanities.

For more information about 
Poverty Point or World Heritage,
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Wednesday, September 3, 2014

New Geoglyphs Found in Nazca Desert After Sandstorm

Image Courtesy of Elcomercio and Phys.Org.
Image Courtesy of Elcomercio and Phys.Org.
August 7, 2014.
Phys.Org has written a brief article about new geoglyphs found in the Nazca desert after recent sand-storms.

"The newly revealed figures discovered by de la Torre are of a snake (approximately 196 feet in length), a bird, a camelid (perhaps a llama) and some zig-zag lines. They are actually on some hills in the El Ingenio Valley and Pampas de Jumana near the  floor. Archeologists have been alerted to authenticate the find."

To read the full article, click here.

For more information about the Nazca Lines, 
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Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Buffalo Bill Center of the West Online Collections


"With our five museums and research library, we house and exhibit thousands of objects—from the common-place to the extraordinary—representing aspects of the American West.

Here in our online collections database, we include every object for which we have a photograph. As you'll find out during your explorations, for many of our objects, we have a lot of good information—for others the information is rather sparse. We know these records are not perfect! Do you know something about a particular object that we don't? Please leave a comment to share your own knowledge with us.

Which objects speak to you? Explore our collections here! You can even create your own virtual "exhibit" of objects and view those of other visitors."
-Buffalo Bill Center of the West.


Video is Courtesy of the Buffalo Bill Center of the West
Cody, Wyoming.

Within the Buffalo Bill Center of the West's collections 
are many which are connected to Great Lakes history. 
Of these include:
Makers
Collections