Tuesday, August 16, 2016

Brief (Promise) Blog Hiatus until September

We have been working hard behind the scenes to keep up the posting on our blog while restructuring, developing upcoming research projects, advocating for American Indians in Ohio, and working on the Hopewell Ceremonial Earthworks nomination within the Ohio World Heritage committee.
Deadlines are approaching for a variety of our projects and so our blog posts will be tapering off until September. The Newark Earthworks Center continues to operate with provisional funding as we identify and research exciting projects.

Your support and recommendations are incredibly important to us, are instrumental in maintaining our existence, and allow us to provide resources to help you.

The Newark Earthworks Center looks forward to continuing to identify opportunities, sources, and relevant news to share with you. Our Facebook group will remain active through our blog hiatus; although please feel free to contact us at earthworks@osu.edu or at 740-364-9584.

We enjoy hearing from you and consider your feedback carefully.

Best Wishes,

Marti Chaatsmith (Comanche Nation Citizen/ Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma Descendant)
Interim Director of the Newark Earthworks Center
The Ohio State University

Tuesday, August 9, 2016

Lakota Winter Counts Online Exhibit

Lakota Winter Counts Online Exhibition.

"The Lakota marked the passage of time by drawing pictures of memorable events on calendars known as winter counts. This online exhibit features a searchable database of Smithsonian winter count images, a documentary about Lakota history and culture, video interviews with Lakota people with personal connections to the winter-count-keeping tradition, and a Teachers' Guide."

About This Exhibit
"This online exhibit was created in response to requests from Lakota educators and community members to make primary source materials in Smithsonian collections available online for Lakota researching their cultural heritage. It is based on consultations that Candace Greene and Christina Burke held in a series of Lakota communities in 2002 as they were preparing a book called The Year the Stars Fell: Lakota Winter Counts at the Smithsonian ...

The winter counts are from the Smithsonian's National Anthropological Archives and National Museum of the American Indian. The commentary that accompanies the individual winter count years was provided by Lakota winter count keepers or, in the case of the Rosebud Winter Count, by Russell Thornton. For the most part, these comments and explanations have come to the Smithsonian through a series of interpreters and intermediaries whose words are faithfully presented here as primary sources. Their usage, grammar, and spelling reflect the knowledge and attitudes of the period when they were written...."

View Winter Counts
  • Overview
    • By Year and Author
      • 1701-1903
      • American Horse, Battiste Good, Cloud Shield, Flame, Lone Dog, Long Soldier, Rosebud, Swan, Major Bush, No Ears
  • Artifact
  • Entry
    • Name of the Year
    • Collector's Note
  • Search Results
    • Plants and Animals
    • Ceremonies
    • Health
    • Trade Goods
    • Places
    • People
    • US Government
    • The Sky
  • My Winter Counts
    • Send to Your Email Address
What Are Winter Counts?
  • Winter Count Overview
    • Counting by Winters
    • Winter Count Keepers
    • Pictures and Materials
  • Lakota Comments
    • Robert Gipp
    • Wilbur Flying By
    • Pepper Young
    • Phylis Young
    • Tipizi Young
    • Steve Emery
Who Are the Lakota?
  • Historical Overview (Audio)
    • The Lakota
    • Sioux People
    • Lakota/Teton
    • Minnesota Origins
    • Westard Migration
    • Horses and Guns
    • Conflicts
    • Treaties
    • Great Sioux Reservation
    • Land Cession
  • Contemporary Perspectives
    • Commentary
      • Robert Gipp
      • Pepper Young
      • Phylis Young
      • Tipizi Young
      • Steve Emery
      • Wilbur Flying By
  • Environment
  • Social Structure
Learning Resources

  • Teachers' Guide
    • "created to help you incorporate Lakota winter counts into your curriculum. It includes relevant background information, visual material, topic suggestions, sample lesson plans and resource lists, along with instructions on navigating the Lakota winter count online exhibit. Before using this material, please review the guidelines for teaching culturally sensitive material, developed by the Department of Anthropology of the National Museum of Natural History. The Teachers' Guide includes a glossary with definitions for anthropological terms and Lakota words. The Audio Glossary in the online exhibit provides pronunciation for Lakota terms."
    • Download the Entire Guide (2MB)
      • What are Winter Counts
      • Using the Online Exhibit
      • Cultural Considerations
      • In the Curriculum
      • Lesson Plans
      • Who Are the Lakota?
      • The Smithsonian Collection
      • Glossary
      • Bibliography
      • Downladable Images
      • The Winter Counts
  • Bibliography
  • Additional Sources

Thursday, August 4, 2016

Newark Earthworks Center Generated Calendars


If you have ever wanted to subscribe to the Newark Earthworks Center's Calendar or
our American Indian Events Calendar, we have added the ical file (.ics) subscription links
 under each calendar!

For general tutorials in adding an internet calendar subscription to
Google Calendar or Microsoft Outlook see the links below.

For more information,
Visit:

Wednesday, August 3, 2016

Summer Trip: The Ancient Ohio Trail Route | Lebanon to Pollock and the Upper Little Miami Valley


These itineraries suggest many opportunities to extend, deepen, and customize your travel throughout Ohio. Enjoy "early Ohio" sites like historic inns, ancient roads tracing American Indian and settlers pathways, plus canals, historic sites and early industries.

This route consists of seven optional sites:
  1. Lebanon
  2. Waynesville
  3. Kinsey Road Mound
  4. Wilberforce
  5. Clifton Gorge
  6. Yellow Springs
  7. Pollock Earthworks
The Ancient Ohio Trail
For more information, visit: The Ancient Ohio Trail.

Tuesday, August 2, 2016

The Age of Exploration Digital Maps Collection


"The Age of Exploration Digital Maps Collection has as its focus the digitization and study of maps of the Western Hemisphere from the sixteenth through eighteenth centuries, beginning with the earliest conceptualization of the lay of the land and waterways through the solidification of geographic knowledge and advancements in cartography. These artistic renderings of time and space also convey much about society, culture, and politics of the imperial era, as Europeans sought to expand their influence through trade with, and a colonial occupation of, the Americas. These maps tell us indirectly about European conceptualizations of imperial “self” as well as colonized “other,” including portraits, as they do, of indigenous peoples they encountered (or imagined, if endeavoring to convey information collected on voyages made by earlier explorers/conquerors)"

Alphabetical Listing [7 maps]

Search Maps
" Please do not download and print any of these photographs for publication in any form without requesting permission from the repositories that hold the original manuscripts."

By Period of Composition
  • 16th Century
    • 1500s
    • "Americae sive Novi Orbis..." by Abraham Ortelius, 1570 [1608-1612]. Analysis by Dr. James Walker
      • Description [map's context]
      • Zoom in-out
      • Annotated Image Map
        • "showing all available annotations, transcriptions and translations"
      • Analysis Browser
        • "browse annotations, text transcriptions, translations, and descriptions of individual map details"
  • 17th Century
    • 1600s
  • 18th Century
    • 1700s
By Region
  • Western Hemisphere
  • World Maps
  • The Pacific
By Maker
  • Sebastian Munster
  • Hnas Holbein
  • John Speed
  • Michael Mercator
  • Abraham Ortelius

Wednesday, July 27, 2016

Summer Trip: The Ancient Ohio Trail Route | Marietta, Muskingum

The Ancient Ohio Trail Route | Marietta, Muskingum

These itineraries suggest many opportunities to extend, deepen, and customize your travel throughout Ohio. Enjoy "early Ohio" sites like historic inns, ancient roads tracing American Indian and settlers pathways, plus canals, historic sites and early industries.

This route consists of ten optional sites:
  1. Marietta
  2. Conus Mound
  3. Campus Martius Museum & Ohio River Museum
  4. Capitolium Mound
  5. Quadranaou Mond
  6. Devola Lock
  7. Big Bottom Massacre
  8. Stockport
  9. McConnellsville
  10. Zanesville, "Zane's Trace"
The Ancient Ohio Trail
For more information, visit: The Ancient Ohio Trail.

The Newark Earthworks.
Image Courtesy of the Ancient Ohio Trail.
The Newark Earthworks, "The Largest Geometric Earthwork Complex in the World",
is close by if you want to add it to your trip!

For more information about UNESCO World Heritage, 

Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Booming Out: Mohawk Ironworkers Build New York Online Exhibit

Booming Out: Mohawk Ironworkers Build New York Online Exhibit.

"Mohawk people have been building bridges and skyscrapers for more than 100 years. Beginning as unskilled laborers, they quickly earned a reputation for being top-notch workers on high steel.

Later, they began "booming out" from Native communities in upstate New York and Canada in search of work on windswept girders far from home. Today, Mohawk ironworkers still leave their homes and families to search for work, continuing a tradition that spans six generations

This photography exhibition portrays the history and contemporary lives of Mohawk ironworkers from two Native communities: Akwesasne (which straddles Ontario, Quebec, and New York State) and Kahnawake (near Montreal). The images reflect the towering contribution Mohawk people have made to the United States, Canada, and, especially, New York City."

A sliding arrow allows you to view the exhibit. 
Moving your mouse over an image will cause it 
to enlarge and a caption to show to the left.

Thursday, July 21, 2016

Did Women and Children Exist in Prehistory?

"The archaeological record tends to preserve stone tools rather than perishable remains,  such as this split-twig figurine found in Dolores Cave, near Gunnison, Colorado." Image Courtesy of Sapiens and the Denver Museum of Nature & Science (A1291.1).
"The archaeological record tends to preserve stone tools rather than perishable remains,
such as this split-twig figurine found in Dolores Cave, near Gunnison, Colorado."
Image Courtesy of Sapiens and the Denver Museum of Nature & Science (A1291.1). 
June 15, 2016.
Stephen E. Nash, of SAPIENS, has written a thoughtful article about the importance of including women and children in archaeological interpretations of the past.

"I have long been troubled by archaeological research on Paleoindian North America, where Clovis, Folsom, and other projectile-point styles, dating from about 13,000 to 9,000 years ago, are analyzed as if no other technologies existed. Part of this emphasis on projectile points is a function of preservation—whereas kill sites, hunting camps, bones, and stone tools are reasonably well-preserved across the American West, Paleoindian campsites are rare, and perishable remains (e.g., nets, baskets, clothing, shoes, etc.) are even rarer..."

To read the full articleclick here.

For more information,
Visit: