Tuesday, April 12, 2022

Wombed Hollows, Sacred Trees: Burial Mounds and Processual Indigenous Subjectivity & Earthworks Tour

Dr. Chadwick Allen, University of Washington. Image courtesy of Dr. Chadwick Allen.

Thursday, April 14, 4-6PM | 18th Avenue Library with Zoom Livestream

Since the eighteenth century, settler cultures have represented North American burial mounds as ancient “mysteries” and historical “enigmas”—sites of Indigenous vanishing that provide settlers with opportunities for creating scientific discovery, economic profit, and cautionary tales of angry ghosts from “lost” civilizations. But there are other narratives to tell about these sophisticated earthworks, other conceptual frames for understanding not only their functions as technologies for interment but also their ongoing power as symbols for Indigenous presence. Drawing from his new book Earthworks Rising: Mound Building in Native Literature and Arts, Chadwick Allen analyzes works by contemporary Native writers and artists that demonstrate Indigenous conceptions of interment within mounded earth. These provocative “earth”-works unsettle dominant narratives by reactivating Indigenous understandings of burial mounds as active sites of renewal and regeneration.

For more information and registration, visit go.osu.edu/allen
or scan the QR Code below
QR Code link to https://go.osu.edu/allen


Register for the event IN-PERSON here.

Register for Session 1 VIA ZOOM here.

All events sponsored by the CSR are free and open to the public. This event is co-sponsored with the American Indian Studies Program in the Center for Ethnic Studies.

The Zoom livestream of this event will be presented with automated closed captions. If you wish to request traditional CART services or other accommodations, please contact religion@osu.edu. Requests made by about 10 days before the event will generally allow us to provide seamless access, but the university will make every effort to meet requests made after this date.

Starting at 6 p.m. Friday, March 11, masks will be optional in most indoor spaces on The Ohio State University campuses, including residence halls, dining facilities, classrooms, offices and the Ohio Union. In settings where masks are optional, students, faculty, staff and visitors can decide on an individual basis whether or not they will continue to wear a mask.



And don't miss the Newark Earthworks Tour!

Saturday, April 16, 10AM | OSU Newark Campus

The Center for the Study of Religion is thrilled to be sponsoring a curated tour of Newark Earthworks with guest scholar Chadwick Allen and Director of the Newark Earthworks Center, John Low. 

The tour will begin at 10am with lunch to follow at the Newark campus. 

Anyone interested in a bus ride leaving from the Ohio Union should contact our Program Coordinator, Nick Spitulski, at religion@osu.edu.

For those who would like to attend this event, please RSVP to our email at religion@osu.edu. All those who RSVP will be receiving updated information about meeting times via email. Those who wish to drive on their own and meet us at the Newark campus should also RSVP and will receive updated information closer to the event date.

Email religion@osu.edu to RSVP and for additional information; or visit the the Department of Religion.

This event is hosted by the Center for the Study of Religion and the American Indian Studies program.

Tuesday, March 29, 2022

April 10th Artist Gerry Lang Gallery Talk & Octagon Open House!

Celebrate the first Octagon Open House of the year with us and enjoy a gallery talk with artist Gerry Lang at the LeFevre Art Gallery with the "Return from Exile: the Mixed-Blood art of Gerry Lang"!
 
Image of the Octagon State Memorial earthworks, Newark Ohio. Link opens to the event flyer but text is also written below. Image courtesy of The Ohio State University.
The Octagon State Memorial is one of the most spectacular surviving remnants of the Newark Earthworks. The Octagon is connected to a perfectly circular enclosure 1,054 feet in diameter. The architecture of the Octagon Earthworks encodes a sophisticated understanding of geometry and astronomy. It is a National Historical Landmark and is on track to become a World Heritage site! Portions of the Octagon Earthworks is open to the public during daylight hours 365 days a year, but much of the site is used as a private golf course for most of the year, so access is restricted. Four times each year, however, golfing is suspended and the entire site is made available to the general public.

The Ancient Ohio Trail
Take your tour with you!
The site will be open daylight to dusk. 
Please revisit the Ohio History Connection for more information.



Students who would like transportation from the OSU-Newark to the Octagon Earthworks must complete this form by April 7 at 5 p.m. 

We will contact you on Friday, 4/8/22 to confirm details. 
If you have questions, contact Lesha Farias at  farias.8@osu.edu.


At 2 PM Director of the Newark Earthworks Center Dr. John Low will be giving a guided tour  of the Octagon State Memorial Earthworks

Dr. Low (left in bright green) giving a tour to the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Elder's Council, 2014. Image courtesy of Timothy E. Black.
Dr. Low (left in bright green) giving a tour
to the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Elder's Council, 2014.
Image courtesy of Timothy E. Black.













And at 4 PM Artist Gerry Lang is giving a Gallery Talk: "Return from Exile: the Mixed-Blood Art of Gerry Lang" at the LeFevre Art Gallery at OSU Newark!

Gerry Lang standing in front of a blue-toned art piece. Image courtesy of the artist.
Gerry Lang is a multi-medium artist who traces the tangled journey paths between self, community and identity and the ways we can be embraced, rejected, celebrated, or dismissed based upon perception and perspective. His award winning art presents a thought provoking panorama of the artist’s own processes of challenge, discovery and resistance to labels of assumption and consumption as a mixed-blood messenger.

Newark, OH 43055

Gallery Hours: Monday - Friday, 
8 a.m. - 6 p.m.

Gerry Lang holding a turtle shell art piece. Image courtesy of the artist.
Learn more about the artist at Gerry Lang Studios.



This exhibit can be viewed during regular gallery hours throughout the spring semester. 



Sponsored by the Ohio State University Newark Earthworks Center and made possible by a grant from the Global Arts + Humanities Discovery Theme at the Ohio State University.

Thursday, March 24, 2022

Hopewell Ceremonial Earthworks Submitted to the UN for Consideration!

Eastern Shawnee Tribe members in their regalia at the World Heritage Celebration at the Great Circle, part of the Newark Earthworks and the Hopewell Ceremonial Earthworks nomination. Image courtesy of Timothy E. Black.
Eastern Shawnee Tribe members in their regalia at the World Heritage Celebration at the Great Circle part of the Newark Earthworks & the Hopewell Ceremonial Earthworks World Heritage nomination.

We begin our day with fantastic news!! 

Last night, the U.S. Department of the Interior officially announced that it has submitted the Hopewell Ceremonial Earthworks World Heritage nomination to the UNESCO World Heritage Committee on behalf of the United States of America.

A 15+ year collaboration among Ohio History Connection, Hopewell Culture National Historical Park, federally recognized Tribal Nations with historic ties to Ohio, and a robust team of avid supporters has brought this dream to fruition! 

World Heritage inscription is based on stringent criteria
and signifies outstanding universal value to humanity. 
Making the list helps ensure a site’s permanent preservation, enhanced understanding, deeper appreciation, and increased tourism.

Visual overlay of the sites within the Hopewell Ceremonial Earthworks nomination. Images courtesy of the Newark Earthworks Center and The Ancient Ohio Trail.

Hopewell Ceremonial Earthworks Sites


"This constitutes the official notice of the decision by the United States Department of the Interior to submit a nomination to the World Heritage List for the “Hopewell Ceremonial Earthworks"...The nomination was submitted through the U.S. Department of State to the World Heritage Centre of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) for consideration by the World Heritage Committee, which will likely occur at the Committee's 46th annual session in mid-2023." -National Archives Federal Register, Notice by the National Park Service 3/23/2022.

Please join us in celebrating this milestone! 

Thanks for your support!

World Heritage Ohio link.

The World Heritage Program

The World Heritage Program of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) was established to encourage the permanent protection of cultural and natural treasures around the globe. With inspiration from America’s National Park system, and leadership from the U.S. under the Nixon administration, an international treaty (called the Convention) was signed in 1972, with the U.S. as the first signatory. Today, 191 countries have ratified the Convention. The U.S. has 23 Inscribed Sites so far, ten of which are cultural. The entire worldwide list of around 1,000 properties can be explored on an interactive map.

How to Help Now.

Only 23 of the UNESCO World Heritage sites are located in the US, and none are in Ohio. But Ohioans are now working actively to advance the Hopewell Ceremonial Earthworks – currently on the U.S. “Tentative List” which means they are eligible – to become inscribed. We encourage you to visit these sites and the communities they’re located in so that you can tell your friends, your family and your elected leaders about the importance of these amazing places. Let them know you think these sites deserve to be the next U.S. nomination for World Heritage. Thank you!

Instagram: #worldheritage #worldheritageohio #findyourpark

For more information,

Visit:

Wednesday, March 23, 2022

April 10th & 11th: Octagon Open House

The Octagon State Memorial, Newark Earthworks Map. Image courtesy of the Ancient Ohio Trail.
The Octagon State Memorial, Newark Earthworks Map.
Image courtesy of the Ancient Ohio Trail.

The Octagon State Memorial is one of the most spectacular surviving remnants of the Newark Earthworks. The Octagon is connected to a perfectly circular enclosure 1,054 feet in diameter. The architecture of the Octagon Earthworks encodes a sophisticated understanding of geometry and astronomy. It is a National Historical Landmark and is on track to become a World Heritage site! Portions of the Octagon Earthworks is open to the public during daylight hours 365 days a year, but much of the site is used as a private golf course for most of the year, so access is restricted. Four times each year, however, golfing is suspended and the entire site is made available to the general public.

The site will be open daylight to dusk. 
Details are pending. 
Please revisit the Ohio History Connection closer to the first open house date.


Monday, March 14, 2022

Faculty Talks Outside the Box: "Unsettling Archaeology and History in an American Heartland: Recollecting and Reconnecting the Past in the Miami Valley of Southwest Ohio"

Unsettling Archaeology and History in an American Heartland:
Recollecting and Reconnecting the Past in the Miami Valley of Southwest Ohio 

Dr. Robert Cook of The Ohio State University taking notes in a field of tall vegetation. Image courtesy of The Ohio State University.
Presentation by Dr. Robert Cook,  Professor of Anthropology

March 29, 2022 4 PM - 5:30 PM
Virtual Faculty Talks Outside the Box Talk


This talk is free and open to the public.

If you need accommodations, please include that information in the registration above. Requests made 2 weeks prior the event will generally allow seamless access, but OSU will make every effort to meet all requests.

The study of the past is rapidly changing. Archaeologists, historians, and scholars from related disciplines have come to recognize that their work is deeply rooted in the same set of settler/colonial narratives and assumptions that have shaped Western society more broadly. In this "Faculty Talk Outside the Box," Dr. Robert Cook will discuss his work to “decolonize” archaeological and historical research practices. His presentation will focus on his involvement in an interdisciplinary study of a particular site in southwestern Ohio--Turpin--and its goal of helping mend severed attachments to ancestral homelands. Yet this project goes further and conducts a type of archaeology of archaeology itself, studying the process as it was first practiced in the late 1800s and remedying its deficiencies through modern field and lab methods in collaboration with descendant communities and other stakeholders. Ultimately, the goal of the project is to develop a model for a decolonized archaeological research centered on collaboration between archaeologists, historians, descendant communities and the broader public.

For more information, visit The Ohio State University Newark.

Saturday, March 12, 2022

Dr. John Low Elected Board Member of the Chicago History Museum!

Dr. John Low speaking at the World Heritage Celebration, 2013. Image courtesy of Tim Black.

We are pleased to share that Dr. John Low has been elected to the Chicago History Museum (CHM) Board of Trustees for a four-year term. Dr. Low is the first American Indian to have been invited to serve on the Board since its founding in 1856. Dr. Low says he will make sure that he won't be the last. Congratulations, Dr. John Low!

Founded in 1856 and incorporated as a nonprofit organization under the laws of the state of Illinois in 1857, the Chicago Historical Society (CHS) is the city’s oldest cultural institution and home to millions of historical objects, images, and documents. Nationally recognized for its holdings, CHS is devoted to collecting, interpreting, and presenting the rich multicultural history of Chicago, as well as selected areas of American history. In 2006, following an extensive building renovation and rebranding initiative, CHS created a new public identity for itself as the Chicago History Museum (CHM), which operates as the building and institutional public presence under the auspices and legal oversight of CHS.

The Museum’s collection of more than 23 million objects, images, and documents records the evolution of Chicago, one of the nation’s most significant cities, from fur-trading outpost to modern metropolis. The collection reflects their commitment to share Chicago’s stories by serving as a hub of scholarship and learning, inspiration, and civic engagement. The collection also includes historical materials that document the rise of America from colonial possession to independent nation to divided country engulfed in civil war.

As a cultural institution dedicated to community, civic engagement, and storytelling, we need to hold ourselves to a higher standard. We are committing ourselves to create a more inclusive, representative, and equitable institution, which includes sharing authority for the documentation and interpretation of the city’s history. We recognize the importance of developing relationships, adding value, and creating trust in communities we have previously under- or misrepresented and know that this work takes time. We are dedicating ourselves to creating a practice in which we are continually learning how to become a better resource for our community by actively inviting them into our process and welcoming an open dialogue on how to best represent our city.

Monday, February 28, 2022

Roundtable One | On Indigenous Studies

Michael Charles (left) and Gregorio Gonzales (right). Image courtesy of The Ohio State University.

 This series of roundtable webinars features presentations and moderated conversations that foster cross-disciplinary exchange. Each roundtable showcases two to three members of the Global Arts + Humanities Discovery Theme's post-MFA and postdoctoral cohort whose work shares disciplinary, methodological and/or topical alignment.

March 11th, 2022

RSVP

11-12 AM on Zoom

If you require an accommodation such as live captioning or interpretation to participate in this event you can request this on the Zoom RSVP above.

Roundtable One: On Indigenous Studies

  • Michael Charles | Postdoctoral Researcher, Newark Earthworks Center
  • Gregorio Gonzales | Postdoctoral Researcher, Department of Comparative Studies
  • Moderator: Melissa Curley | Associate Professor, Department of Comparative Studies
  • Moderator: John Low | Director of Newark Earthworks Center

About GAHDT’s post-MFA and postdoctoral program

This program supports post-MFA and postdoctoral researchers and creative practitioners and provides professional development opportunities with the goal of facilitating their entry into tenure-track positions in the academic marketplace and the public arts and humanities. The valuable presence of these researchers and practitioners adds intellectual energy and vitality to the College of Arts and Sciences as a whole, contributing to interdisciplinary collaboration between academic units and the development of innovative scholarship and curricula.


For more information, visit the Global Arts + Humanities Discovery Theme.

Monday, February 14, 2022

TEDxOhioStateUniversity presents Bloom

Feb 26, 2022 12:00 PM - 4:00 PM

TEDxOhioStateUniversity is returning both in-person and in a virtual format for our 2022 main event, Bloom!

Featuring 12 amazing speakers and an incredible performance group, TEDx is in full bloom for our 11th annual main event. The event will be from 12-4 pm on Saturday, February 26th at the Mershon Auditorium. Doors for the in-person event open at 11:00 AM, with program beginning at 12:00PM. Our building is open, masks are required indoors.

If you have questions about accessibility or require an accommodation to participate in this event, please contact Accessibility Manager Helyn Marshall at accessibility@wexarts.org or call (614) 688–3890. 

You have the option to purchase in-person or virtual (livestream) tickets. In the event that the program goes fully virtual, all tickets will become a virtual ticket and attendees will be contacted with more information. 

Mershon Auditorium, Wexner Center

1871 N High Street,

Columbus, OH 43210

Get your tickets today!

  • Students $15
  • Other $20
  • Livestream $10

The Newark Earthworks Center's Director Dr. John Low is one of the featured speakers! He will discuss the importance of Native perspectives for a fuller understanding of the Newark Earthworks. Dr. Low will also recognize the global significance of these sites and their nomination to be World Heritage Sites with UNESCO.

Meet our speakers:

  • Scott Gaudi
    • An astronomer by training, Scott works with NASA, industry, the astronomical community, and the public to help develop the next generation of great space observatories designed to answer some of humanity's most profound questions.
  • Umit Ozkan
    • Umit Ozkan teaches Chemical Engineering at Ohio State. Her research focuses on catalysis and electrocatalysis, with applications relevant to energy, environment and sustainability.
  • Iman Ansari
    • Iman Ansari’s work focuses on the historical and contemporary relationship between architecture and medicine. He is interested in how various things—gases, fluids, particles, humans, and non-humans—move and interact with and within buildings, and how architecture can provide a better framework to rethink and reimagine those interactions.
  • Morgan Podraza
    • From comics and movies to toys and memes, Morgan Podraza's work explores how we play with media and how those experiences shape our relationships with ourselves and one another.
  • Richard Giang
    • The way that Richard best communicates is through a shared meal. Being born of Vietnamese immigrant refugee parents, he seeks to share in his food culture and others in creative and innovative ways with the goal of producing a level of interconnectedness and understanding throughout the community.
  • Douglas Crews
    • Dr. Crews is a biological anthropologist specializing in evolutionary biology and human adaptability, as illustrated by senescence, frailty, stressor responses, and allostatic load within and across ecological and sociocultural settings, including Samoa, Japan, Kuwait, Poland, and the United States.
  • Lauren Pond
    • Lauren Pond is a documentary photographer whose work focuses on religion in the United States. She uses her camera to share the nuanced stories of communities across the country and to illustrate how religion intersects with everyday human experience.
  • Meta Brown
    • Meta Brown is a member of OSU’s economics department faculty; her previous posts include the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, the University of Wisconsin, and Stony Brook University. Meta’s research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation and has appeared in the American Economic Review, the Review of Economic Studies, and OSU’s own Journal of Money, Credit and Banking.
  • Bart Elmore
    • Bart first became passionate about environmental justice while trekking and paddling through the woods and streams of North Georgia. He soon discovered he wanted to be an educator when teaching in Savannah, Georgia, and then went north to study environmental history, which he now teaches with an eye towards finding lessons from the past that can create a more ecologically sustainable future.
  • Elena Foulis
    • Elena Foulis is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese. She is an oral historian who is committed to amplifying the voices of the Latine Community in Ohio.
  • Carter Phillips
    • Carter Phillips, an OSU alum, has argued more cases in private practice before the US Supreme Court than anyone in history. He clerked for Chief Justice Warren Burger, argued his first Supreme Court case in January 1982 and has argued a total of 88 times before the Court.
  • John Low 
    • Dr. John Low is a citizen of the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, an associate professor at Ohio State University - Newark, and the Director of the Newark Earthworks Center. His talk will discuss the importance of Native perspectives for a fuller understanding of the Newark Earthworks. He will also recognize the global significance of these sites and their nomination to be World Heritage Sites with UNESCO.
  • Chinese Folk Music Orchestra ​
    • This years Bloom performance group is the wonderful Chinese Folk Music Orchestra!🎶 Chinese culture has evolved and been passed down for thousands of years, and folk music is one of the most important representations of Chinese culture. Chinese Folk Music Orchestra uses music to express Chinese culture and belief, with traditional Chinese instruments combined with some western instruments.

Wexner Center of the Arts Know Before You Go: 

Visiting the Wex.

Updated January 10, 2022

With the surge in COVID cases, we have updated our safety protocols to be as responsive as possible to this ever-changing situation and to keep the health and safety of our guests, artists, and staff at top of mind.

Visiting
Facial coverings are required in all areas of the center, regardless of vaccination status, when you visit.

We have reduced the capacity in our theater, galleries, performance spaces, café, and store to ensure as much safe physical distancing as possible.

With reduced capacities and to ensure as safe a visit as possible, we encourage you to buy your tickets for programs online, ahead of time. This will save time at the front desk and minimize your contact with others so you have more time to enjoy the exhibition, performance, talk, or film (and remember: a ticket to a film or performance gets you free admission to our galleries) You can also purchase a ticket by calling our ticket desk at (614) 292-3535.

Heirloom Café has reopened with limited seating. Heirloom offers online ordering for pickup to help save time in line. You can also order Heirloom through DoorDash [external link] and GrubHub [external link].

Cleaning Procedures and Protocols

We are continuing with our extensive cleaning procedures.

We disinfect and sanitize throughout the day and overnight when we close the doors for the day.

Speaking of sanitizing: we've increased the number of hand sanitizing stations around our building.

Restrooms will be open and cleaned throughout the day.

Our air circulation and filtration throughout the building has been formally assessed and enhancements have been made by engineers to provide safe, clean air.

We encourage practicing physical distancing in the galleries, store, and theater.

Shields remain installed at our ticket desk and in the Store to protect both staff and you.

If you’ve any questions about these protocols, please email the Wexner Center of Arts.