Wednesday, March 11, 2020

Stay Healthy | Coronavirus Updates | Cancelled Events

March 9, 2020
President Michael V. Drake updated the media on what The Ohio State University is doing to address the challenges of the Coronavirus (COVID-19). Chief Information Officer Mike Hofherr also spoke on how technology is being used by the university to assist faculty, students, and staff.

-Ohio State News. 

-Dr. Ken Yeager and Dr. Maryanna Klatt, March 5, 2020

Please visit Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center Coronavirus for more information or email general questions to coronavirus@osumc.edu .


Regretfully, the Newark Earthworks Center is cancelling
 all sponsored events 
through April 20th, 2020 at this time.


Ohio Department of Health's call center is open and available
to answer your questions about COVID-19: 1-833-427-5634 .

Coronavirus.ohio.gov COVID-19 Fast Facts: Serious respiratory illnesses are spread by coughing and sneezing and touching your face after touching contaminated objects. Wash your hands frequently, cover your cough, and if you're sick, please stay home. Ohio Department of Health. Image Courtesy of the Ohio Department of Health's Twitter.

For more information,
Visit:

Thursday, February 27, 2020

Cancelled | Behind the Science: The Dakota and Ojibwe Skies

March 11, 2020: Regretfully, the Newark Earthworks Center is cancelling  all sponsored events through April 20th, 2020 at this time.
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February 24, 2020 
Just in time to observe the spring equinox, The Ohio State University at Newark and The Works: Ohio Center for History, Art & Technology invite the public to learn how our American Indian ancestors used the moon, earthen architecture, and a turtle’s shell to predict astronomical events with remarkable precision.

Jim Rock [Dakota] with Ojibwe Skies Map behind him. Image Courtesy of Jim Rock.In this Behind the Science lecture, James Rock presents
 “The Dakota and Ojibwe Skies” 
on Thursday, March 19,
 from 6 to 7 p.m. in the SciDome planetarium.

Rock, a citizen of the Dakota Nation, is a faculty member in the Department of Physics and Astronomy and Director of Indigenous Programming for the Marshall W. AlworthPlanetarium at the University of Minnesota Duluth. In 2014 he co-authored the book D(L)akota Star Map Constellation Guide and has co-published several journal articles on Dakota sacred mound and cave sites. He will discuss both topics from his published works in addition to local connections with the Newark Earthworks and the Serpent Mound in Peebles.

This lecture is sponsored by the following units at The Ohio State University: Newark Earthworks Center (NEC), American Indian Studies program, Arne Slettebak Planetarium, and Global Arts and Humanities/Indigenous Arts andHumanities Initiative.

Behind the Science is a public lecture series presented by Ohio State Newark and The Works for adults who want an inside view of the science that makes our world.

All lectures are held in the SciDome at The Works located at 55 S. 1st Street in Newark.
Admission is free for The Works’ members and $10 for nonmembers. Reservations are recommended and can be made online at attheworks.org or by calling The Works at 740-349-9277.
For additional details, visit go.osu.edu/SciDome or see The Works’ online calendar of events.

Thursday, February 13, 2020

February 14, 2020: Bodéwadmi Wisgat Gokpenagen | The Black Ash Baskets of the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians Opening

Art and Artifact Material Culture and Meaning Making Exhibit Opening Flyer. Image courtesy of NativeOSU.
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Director of the Newark Earthworks Center John Low (Pokagon Band of Potawatomi) and Director of the American Indian Studies Program Daniel Rivers (Choctaw) will speak. 

February 14, 2020
3 - 6 PM

Food and drink will be served; come help us celebrate AIS at OSU!

Free and open to the public.

Sullivant Hall Collaboratory 141
1813 N High Street
Columbus, OH 43210

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According to exhibit curator John N. Low, PhD, Potawatomi basket making is a reclamation and recovery of a piece of native knowledge and technology, and it represents a potent counter-colonial and counter-hegemonic act with lasting implications. Low is an Associate Professor of Comparative Studies at Ohio State Newark and an enrolled citizen of the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians.

“This exhibit reflects an understanding that objects are not lifeless things that occupy space. They have spirit and meaning,” he said. “Centered upon intellectual and material property, basket weaving is an opportunity for native women and men to make their own histories by using the past to ‘read’ the present.”

The exhibit is sponsored by grants from The Ohio State University Global Arts and Humanities’ Indigenous Arts and Humanities InitiativeAmerican Indian Studies program, Ohio State Newark Milliken Fund and the Newark Earthworks Center

“This is an opportunity to learn about and enjoy the artistry of American Indian peoples of the Midwest. The exhibit explores the ways in which objects like baskets communicate to those who take the time to ‘listen’,” said Low. “See the iconic black ash basketry of the Potawatomi Indians, and join in the celebration of the revival of this art.”

This exhibit was previously shown at the LeFevre Art Gallery on the Ohio State University Newark campus.

Director of the Newark Earthworks Center John Low received his PhD in American Culture from the University of Michigan. His most recent book, Imprints: The Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians & the City of Chicago, was published by the Michigan State University Press (2016).

For more information, visit: https://www.instagram.com/p/B8eV69DF545/ .

Friday, February 7, 2020

Falling for Autumn 2020 Classes?

Octagon State Memorial in October in a heart shaped image. Image Courtesy of Tim Black.
Check out our OSU Classes Tab!

We have updated our lists of current and future classes
 by semester and campus.

See below for a sampling of what is currently available 
for Autumn 2020:





American Indian History of the U.S. Midwest
History 2071
Dr. John Low
M W 5:30-6:55 PM
3 credit hours.
Native American history in Great Lakes and Ohio Valley regions from ancient times to the present, including moundbuilders, fur trade, removal, reservations, urbanization, contemporary issues. Sometimes this course is offered in a distance-only format. 
Prerequisite or concurrent: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. 
GE historical study and diversity soc div in the US course.
Limit of 35 students.

Introduction to Native American Peoples from Mesoamerica
History 2110
Dr. Alcira Dueñas
M W 12:45-2:05 PM
3 credit hours.
Introductory survey of the Native American peoples from Mesoamerica (contemporary Guatemala, Honduras, Southern Mexico) from pre-colonial times to the present. Sometimes this course is offered in a distance-only format. 
Prerequisite or concurrent: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. 
GE historical study and diversity global studies course.
Limit of 40 students.

The History of Latin America Through Film
History 2125
Dr. Alcira Dueñas
M W 2:20-3:40 PM
3 credit hours.
Latin American history from the pre-colonial era to the present as depicted in film, including the analysis of colonialism, revolutions, society, women, and current events. Sometimes this course is offered in a distance-only format. 
Prerequisite or concurrent: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. 
GE historical study and diversity global studies course.
Limit of 35 students.

Natives and Newcomers: Immigration and Migration in U.S. History
History 2750 
Dr. Lucy Murphy
T R 9:35-10:55 PM
3 credit hours.
General survey of (im)migration history in the U.S. from precolonial times to the present. Topics include cultural contact, economic relations, citizenship, politics, family, and sexuality.
Prerequisites or Concurrent: English 1100.xx.
Not open to students with credit for 322.
GEC: Historical Study and Social Diversity in the United States credit. 
Limit of 40 students.

History of Mexico
History 3106
Dr. Alcira Dueñas
M W 9:35-10:55 AM
3 credit hours.
History of Mexico during precolonial, colonial, and independence periods with emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries.
Prerequisites: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor.
Not open to students with credit for 534.03.
GEC historical study and diversity global studies course. 
Limit of 35 students.

Literature and Religion
Religious Studies 2102.01
Cheryl Cash
T R 5:30-6:50 PM
3 credit hours.
Study of relationships between religion and secular literature; analysis of religious and spiritual elements of literature and film of diverse cultures and historical periods. 
Prerequisites: English 1110 (110) or equiv. Not open to students with credit for 2102.01H, Comparative Studies 2102.01 (202.01), or 2102.01H (202.01H). 
GE lit and diversity global studies course.
Limit of 35 students.

Wednesday, January 8, 2020

Need to Talk? Call a Buckeye PAL!

Buckeye Peer Access Line operates Monday through Friday from 8 p.m. to midnight when classes are in session during fall and spring semesters. 


Buckeye PAL operating hours for Spring 2020 

will begin Monday January 13, 2020

Call 614-514-3333.

The Buckeye Peer Access Line (PAL) is a non-emergency talk line that provides a space for students to engage in brief phone conversations in order to gain support and learn about campus resources. Student volunteers are available to provide peer-to-peer assistance that promotes and enhances student development and wellbeing. 

Common conversation topics with Buckeye PAL include: 
  • Adjusting to college and university life
  • Balancing stress management
  • Managing platonic, romantic and family relationships
  • Feeling pressure to succeed
  • Navigating personal and social identities 
What makes the Peer Access Line different from a Crisis Hotline? 

Both the Crisis Hotline and Buckeye Peer Access Line can be incredibly valuable for students. If you think you are at risk of harm to self or others, please call 911 or contact Columbus Suicide Prevention Hotline at 614-221-5445. If you want to just talk or need support, especially after hours, BuckeyePAL is a great fit for you! 

Buckeye Peer Access Line (PAL)
Buckeye PAL provides accessible, peer-to-peer support that promotes and enhances student development, wellbeing and a community of care after hours. 

Buckeye PAL volunteers are graduate, professional and undergraduate students who have participated in comprehensive and specific trainings. Volunteers serve as a support system for their peers and will refer them to appropriate resources. 

Buckeye PAL volunteers practice active listening skills and are available to simply talk. What you tell a volunteer is generally private. Volunteers will not disclose any information about a client’s identity or situation. However, in circumstances where an individual is in immediate and severe danger, confidentiality is not maintained. Additionally, Buckeye PAL volunteers are mandatory Title IX reporters and will report instances of sexual assault, sexual harassment, domestic/dating violence, stalking, sex-and gender-based discrimination and pregnancy discrimination.

*The Buckeye PAL does not operate during university breaks, exam weeks or when university offices are closed.

Crisis Hotline 

Crisis Hotline is a 24/7/365 service that assesses suicide risk and will help callers in high distress and emergency situations. 

Crisis Hotline staff are trained to listen, assess suicide risk and give support to callers in high distress.   

Crisis Hotline is a confidential service and works with the caller to reduce risk of harm to self or others. They will provide information and assistance to relatives, friends, co-workers and others who are concerned about a suicidal individual. 

If you are experiencing a crisis or have an urgent need, please call the Office of Student Life Counseling and Consultation office at 614-292-5766 to speak with a therapist. We see students by scheduled appointments and are currently unable to provide walk in services. In the event of an emergency or need to speak with a clinician immediately, please visit your nearest emergency department or Netcare Access (http://www.netcareaccess.org/).

After-hours, Counseling and Consultation Service provides crisis consultation for students by calling 614-292-5766 and choosing option 2 which includes weekends and holidays. You also have the option to schedule an appointment to speak with a therapist at https://ccs.osu.edu/schedule-a-phonescreening/.

Hotline Information:
  • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 (TALK)
  • National 24/7 suicide hotline: 1-800-SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433)
  • Columbus, Ohio Suicide hotline: (614) 221-5445
  • OSU Reach Campaign
  • Save-Suicide Awareness
  • Military Veterans Suicide Hotline: 1-800-273-TALK (Press 1)
  • Suicide Hotline in Spanish: 1-800-273-TALK (Press 2)
  • LGBT Youth Suicide Hotline: 1-866-4-U-TREVOR
  • Trans Lifeline: 877-565-8860
  • Crisis Text Life/The Steve Fund for young people of color: Text STEVE to 741741
  • SARNCO Sexual assault crisis intervention and prevention program 24/7 hotline: 614-267-7020 ; email emily.sarnco@ohiohealth.com , suzie.sarnco@ohiohealth.com
  • Title IX: 614-247-5838 ; email titleix@osu.edu
Crisis Text Line:
  • TEXT “HOME” TO 741-741
  • FREE, 24/7, CONFIDENTIAL.
Crisis Text Line serves anyone in any type of crisis, providing them access to free, 24/7 emotional support and information they need via the medium they already use and trust: text. Here’s how it works:
  • Someone texts into Crisis Text Line anywhere, anytime, about any type of crisis.
  • A live, trained specialist receives the text and responds quickly.
  • The specialist helps the person stay safe and healthy with effective, secure counseling and referrals through text message using Crisis Text Line’s platform.
Other Local Emergency Psychiatric Resources:
  • In Knox and Licking Counties: Dial 2-1-1
  • Netcare Access Crisis Hotline at (614) 276-CARE (2273). Netcare provides twenty-four hour mental health and substance abuse crisis intervention, stabilization and assessment for Franklin County, Ohio residents
  • Riverside Methodist Hospital is located at 3535 Olentangy River Road (614) 566-5321
  • Mount Carmel West Hospital is located at 793 West State Street (614) 234-5000
For more information and additional help, 

Wednesday, December 11, 2019

Don't Miss Our Bodéwadmi Wisgat Gokpenagen The Black Ash Baskets of the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians Exhibit!

Art & Artifact: Material Culture & Meaning Making Exhibit Flyer. PDF available.
PDF available.
Our exhibit closes December 15th, 2019!

LeFevre Art Gallery, LeFevre Hall
The Ohio State University at Newark
Newark, OH 43055

Join us for the opening of a visual journey
 through the history of the Potawatomi people and their art of black ash basket making!


Potawatomi basket making is a reclamation and recovery of a powerful piece of native knowledge and technology and represents a potent counter-colonial and counter-hegemonic act with lasting implications. This exhibit reflects an understanding that objects are not lifeless things that occupy space. They have spirit and meaning. Centered upon intellectual and material property, basket weaving is an opportunity for Native women and men to make their own histories by using the past to ‘read’ the present.
The exhibit is curated by John N. Low, PhD, associate professor in Comparative Studies at the Ohio State University and enrolled citizen of the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians. He received his PhD in American Culture from the University of Michigan. His most recent book Imprints: The Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians & the City of Chicago was published by the Michigan State University Press (2016).
Sponsored by grants from the Global Arts & Humanities/ Indigenous Arts & Humanities Initiative, American Indian Studies, the Milliken Fund at The Ohio State University at Newark,
 and the Newark Earthworks Center.

Wednesday, November 6, 2019

Faculty Talks Outside the Box | Not Just a Pile of Dirt

Facult Talks Outside the Box | Not Just a Pile of Dirt Lecture Flyer. PDF available.
November 15, 2019

3:30 PM

Free & Open to the Public!

Room 175
John L. & Christine Warner Library & Student Center
The Ohio State University at Newark
1219 University Drive
Newark, OH 43055



November 5, 2019.
It is a story similar to hundreds told before — the destruction of historical land to make way for the growth of a booming city. Once encompassing more than four square miles, the Newark Earthworks were built by the people of the ancient Hopewell Culture between 100 B.C. and 500 A.D. All that remains today of the Earthworks are two major segments: the Great Circle Earthworks and the Octagon Earthworks. John Low, Associate Professor of Comparative Studies and the new Director of the Newark Earthworks Center, will discuss these incredible indigenous monuments in their former days and what remains today at an upcoming Faculty Talks Outside the Box lecture.

“It is important to be familiar with these ancestral sites not only because they will likely soon be a United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) World Heritage site, but also because they represent a legacy of human achievement in architecture, astronomy, geometry and evidence of humankind's ability to work together in collaborative undertakings,” said Dr. Low.

Dr. Low will discuss how the Newark Earthworks are an architectural wonder of ancient America, and how they are part cathedral, part cemetery and part astronomical observatory. He will note the work of the Newark Earthworks Center and the importance of the Earthworks as a potential UNESCO World Heritage site.

During Faculty Talks Outside the Box, Ohio State Newark professors discuss recent research in their fields as it relates to our community and answer questions. All talks are free and open to the public. The Warner Center is located at 1219 University Drive, Newark, Ohio.

Wednesday, October 9, 2019

Celebrate Indigenous Peoples' Day at Ohio State Newark!

October 14, 2019
Description:
Indigenous Peoples' Day Flyer. PDF available.
PDF available.

7 - 8 PM

Join us as we celebrate Indigenous People’s Day with Pokagon Potawatomi basket maker Jennie Brown and family!

John L. and Christine Warner 
Library and Student Center
Performance Platform (Room 126)

Free and open to the public. 

The Brown family includes several generations of black ash basket makers. Jennie, mother of Jamie, won the Daniel “Gomez” Mena Master Apprenticeship for her work as a mentor to her son and apprentice Josiah. Jamie’s large strawberry basket was featured on the cover of an issue of the National Museum of the American Indian magazine; and the Smithsonian Institute purchased and will soon display that piece. They will discuss the meaning and power of basket making
This presentation is in conjunction with the exhibit currently being featured in the LeFevre Hall Art Gallery entitled “Art & Artifact: Material Culture & Meaning Making - Bodéwadmi Wisgat Gokpenagen, The Black Ash Baskets of the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians.” 

Sponsored by grants from the Global Arts & Humanities/ Indigenous Arts & Humanities Initiative, the Program in American Indian Studies, the Milliken Fund at The Ohio State University at Newark, and the Newark Earthworks Center.

For more information,
Visit: