Wednesday, November 6, 2019

Faculty Talks Outside the Box | Not Just a Pile of Dirt

Facult Talks Outside the Box | Not Just a Pile of Dirt Lecture Flyer. PDF available.
November 15, 2019

3:30 PM

Free & Open to the Public!

Room 175
John L. & Christine Warner Library & Student Center
The Ohio State University at Newark
1219 University Drive
Newark, OH 43055



November 5, 2019.
It is a story similar to hundreds told before — the destruction of historical land to make way for the growth of a booming city. Once encompassing more than four square miles, the Newark Earthworks were built by the people of the ancient Hopewell Culture between 100 B.C. and 500 A.D. All that remains today of the Earthworks are two major segments: the Great Circle Earthworks and the Octagon Earthworks. John Low, Associate Professor of Comparative Studies and the new Director of the Newark Earthworks Center, will discuss these incredible indigenous monuments in their former days and what remains today at an upcoming Faculty Talks Outside the Box lecture.

“It is important to be familiar with these ancestral sites not only because they will likely soon be a United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) World Heritage site, but also because they represent a legacy of human achievement in architecture, astronomy, geometry and evidence of humankind's ability to work together in collaborative undertakings,” said Dr. Low.

Dr. Low will discuss how the Newark Earthworks are an architectural wonder of ancient America, and how they are part cathedral, part cemetery and part astronomical observatory. He will note the work of the Newark Earthworks Center and the importance of the Earthworks as a potential UNESCO World Heritage site.

During Faculty Talks Outside the Box, Ohio State Newark professors discuss recent research in their fields as it relates to our community and answer questions. All talks are free and open to the public. The Warner Center is located at 1219 University Drive, Newark, Ohio.

Wednesday, October 9, 2019

Celebrate Indigenous Peoples' Day at Ohio State Newark!

October 14, 2019
Description:
Indigenous Peoples' Day Flyer. PDF available.
PDF available.

7 - 8 PM

Join us as we celebrate Indigenous People’s Day with Pokagon Potawatomi basket maker Jennie Brown and family!

John L. and Christine Warner 
Library and Student Center
Performance Platform (Room 126)

Free and open to the public. 

The Brown family includes several generations of black ash basket makers. Jennie, mother of Jamie, won the Daniel “Gomez” Mena Master Apprenticeship for her work as a mentor to her son and apprentice Josiah. Jamie’s large strawberry basket was featured on the cover of an issue of the National Museum of the American Indian magazine; and the Smithsonian Institute purchased and will soon display that piece. They will discuss the meaning and power of basket making
This presentation is in conjunction with the exhibit currently being featured in the LeFevre Hall Art Gallery entitled “Art & Artifact: Material Culture & Meaning Making - Bodéwadmi Wisgat Gokpenagen, The Black Ash Baskets of the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians.” 

Sponsored by grants from the Global Arts & Humanities/ Indigenous Arts & Humanities Initiative, the Program in American Indian Studies, the Milliken Fund at The Ohio State University at Newark, and the Newark Earthworks Center.

For more information,
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Wednesday, October 2, 2019

Octagon Open House | October 13, 2019

Newark Earthworks, Octagon State Memorial.  Image Courtesy of Timothy E. Black.
Newark Earthworks, Octagon State Memorial.
Image Courtesy of Timothy E. Black.
The grounds of the Octagon State Memorial
will be open to the public
for general strolling and viewing 
from sunrise to sunset.


Take your tour with you through:

The Ancient Ohio Trail.

We hope to see you there!

Tuesday, September 17, 2019

The Warrior Women Project Public Film Screening & Discussion with Madona Thunder Hawk, Marcy Gilbert & Dr. Elizabeth Castle

The Warrior Women Project Flyer (PDF available).
PDF available.
1 - 2:30 PM

In the 1970s, with the swagger of unapologetic Indianness, organizers of the American Indian Movement (AIM) fought for Native liberation and survival as a community of extended families. Warrior Women is the story of Madonna Thunder Hawk, one such AIM leader who shaped a kindred
group of activists' children - including her daughter Marcy - into the "We Will Remember" Survival School as a Native alternative to government-run education. Together, Madonna and Marcy fought for Native rights in an environment that made them more comrades than mother-daughter. Today, with Marcy now a mother herself, both are still at the forefront of Native issues, fighting against the
environmental devastation of the Dakota Access Pipeline and for Indigenous cultural values. Through a circular Indigenous style of storytelling, this film explores what it means to navigate a movement and motherhood and how activist legacies are passed down and transformed from generation to generation in the context of colonizing government that meets Native resistance with violence.

Room 110-Auditorium

Sponsored by Ohio State Newark Cultural Arts and Events Committee, Office of Student Life, Native, American Indian & Indigenous Studies Organization (AIISO) student club, GAHDT/IAH grant, the Program in American Indian Studies and Newark Earthworks Center.

For more information, contact John Low, Ph.D, Native American & Indigenous Studies and Vorley Taylor, Multicultural Affairs.


Thursday, September 12, 2019

Gallery Opening of Bodéwadmi Wisgat Gokpenagen, The Black Ash Baskets of the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians

Exhibit Opening Friday, September 13, 4 PM, LeFevre Gallery in LeFevre Hall. Art & Artifact: Material Culture & Meaning Making. Bodéwadmi Wisgat Gokpenagen, The Black Ash Baskets of the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians. Image Courtesy of LeFevre Art Gallery, The Ohio State University at Newark.

September 13 - December 15, 2019.


Exhibit Opening Friday, September 13, 2019
4 PM

LeFevre Art Gallery, LeFevre Hall
The Ohio State University at Newark
Newark, OH 43055

Join us for the opening of a visual journey
through the history of the Potawatomi people and their art of black ash basket making!

This event is free and open to the public.

Potawatomi basket making is a reclamation and recovery of a powerful piece of native knowledge and technology and represents a potent counter-colonial and counter-hegemonic act with lasting implications. This exhibit reflects an understanding that objects are not lifeless things that occupy space. They have spirit and meaning. Centered upon intellectual and material property, basket weaving is an opportunity for Native women and men to make their own histories by using the past to ‘read’ the present.

According to exhibit curator John N. Low, PhD, Potawatomi basket making is a reclamation and recovery of a piece of native knowledge and technology, and it represents a potent counter-colonial and counter-hegemonic act with lasting implications. Low is Director of the Newark Earthworks Center, an associate professor of Comparative Studies at Ohio State Newark, and an enrolled citizen of the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians.

“This exhibit reflects an understanding that objects are not lifeless things that occupy space. They have spirit and meaning,” he said. “Centered upon intellectual and material property, basket weaving is an opportunity for native women and men to make their own histories by using the past to ‘read’ the present.”

“This is an opportunity to learn about and enjoy the artistry of American Indian peoples of the Midwest. The exhibit explores the ways in which objects like baskets communicate to those who take the time to ‘listen’,” said Low. “See the iconic black ash basketry of the Potawatomi Indians, and join in the celebration of the revival of this art.”


For more information,
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Thursday, August 29, 2019

Newark Earthworks Center Welcomes New Director

August 28, 2019.
John N. Low, PhD, associate professor at The Ohio State University at Newark, has been appointed as director of the Newark Earthworks Center (NEC). His term will begin on September 1, 2019, and run through August 31, 2022.

“Since arriving at Ohio State, John has put together not only a strong scholarly record, but an equally impressive record of outreach and engagement” said William L. MacDonald, PhD, dean/director at Ohio State Newark. “I am very happy to announce his new role with the Newark Earthworks Center.”

Dr. John Low. Image Courtesy of The Ohio State University at Newark.
The NEC is an interdisciplinary academic center of The Ohio State University that is focused on advancing the understanding of the cultural and scientific achievements of American Indians through projects and research about the cultures that produced monumental Midwestern earthen architecture. The center started as the Newark Earthworks Initiative in 2005 and became the Newark Earthworks Center in 2006 after receiving official approval from The Ohio State University Board of Trustees.

According to Low, who is a member of the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians and also coordinator of the American Indian Studies minor program at the Newark campus, "I am very excited to join a small but passionate team at the Newark Earthworks Center, as we build upon the foundations laid by former director Dick Shiels and interim director Marti Chaatsmith [Comanche Nation Citizen/Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma descendant]. The Center will continue to grow and evolve. As a center for The Ohio State University we have a unique opportunity to promote scholarly engagement and research as well as contribute to the efforts of World Heritage Ohio to have the Hopewell Ceremonial Earthworks designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site. In the future we will also expand our focus to include earthworks and mounds throughout Ohio, and reach out to scholars, constituents and stakeholders around the world as we make the Ohio State Newark NEC a world class research center."

Low received the American Society for Ethnohistory’s Robert F. Heizer Award for best article for “Vessels of Recollection – the Canoe Building Renaissance in the Great Lakes,” published in 2015 in Material Culture. His book, Imprints: the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians and the City of Chicago (Michigan State University Press), was published in 2016.

He served on the Ohio State Cemetery Law Task Force and has testified before the Ohio legislature regarding establishing an “Indigenous Peoples Day.” Low is the chair of the Ohio State Newark/Central Ohio Technical College Advisory Council for Diversity and Inclusion and a member of the American Indian Studies Faculty Oversight Committee. He has curated three shows reflecting traditional indigenous knowledge at Ohio State Newark’s LeFevre Gallery. In 2015-2016, Low received the COTC/Ohio State Newark President’s and Dean/Director’s Diversity Award. Further, he has served on the oversight committee for the NEC since his arrival at Ohio State.

Low, who teaches in the Department of Comparative Studies, earned a PhD in American culture and a juris doctorate and graduate certificate in museum studies at the University of Michigan. He also earned an MA in the social sciences from the University of Chicago. Before coming to Ohio State, he was a visiting professor in history, law and American studies at Northwestern University, a visiting professor in American Indian Studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and executive director of the Mitchell Museum of the American Indian in Evanston, Illinois.

When Low enters the role of director, Marti Chaatsmith, NEC interim director, will resume the position of associate director. University budget cuts in 2015 put the fate of the NEC in question just as the earthworks were on the brink of international fame. Announced in July 2018, the NEC will continue at Ohio State Newark, becoming the regional campus’s only university center. The decision was reached unanimously by Ohio State’s Council of Academic Affairs. The leadership of Chaatsmith was a key factor in this outcome.


The Ohio State University at Newark offers an academic environment that’s inclusive of diversity, challenging but supportive with world-renowned professors and access to Ohio State’s more than 200 majors. It’s where learning comes to life. Research, study abroad and service learning opportunities prepare students for their careers in ways they never expected.

For more information,
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Wednesday, July 10, 2019

Octagon Open House | July 29, 2019

Newark Earthworks, Octagon State Memorial.  Image Courtesy of Timothy E. Black.
Newark Earthworks, Octagon State Memorial.
Image Courtesy of Timothy E. Black.
The grounds of the Octagon State Memorial
will be open to the public
for general strolling and viewing 
from sunrise to sunset.


Take your tour with you through:

The Ancient Ohio Trail.

We hope to see you there!

Wednesday, July 3, 2019

Not food scraps after all: turtle shells as Native American musical instruments

September 8, 2018.
Amy Smith wrote a brief article on New Historian.com. She summarizes about how recent research has discovered that turtle shells were used for more than just food.

In the past, turtle shells found at archaeological sites have often been dismissed as food remains. However, in an article published in academic journal PLOS One, Professor of Anthropology, Tanya Peres, says these turtle shells were used as rattles and other musical instruments. Gillreath-Brown, a doctoral candidate from Washington State University, says "Turtle shell rattles provide deep insights into human-environment and animal relationships." He also says, "this symbology and belief is imbued into the turtle shell rattles, which are meant to keep rhythm and thereby interjects powerful symbology and spiritual energy into dances and ceremonies." 

The research draws upon turtle shell rattles that have been discovered throughout North America; from Florida to the north east, and all the way up to Canada. Each region is likely to attribute different meaning and levels of importance to these rattles; but their presence in such a widespread group of localities demonstrates that turtle shells were important to creating rhythm in ceremonies across prehistoric North America. 

For more Information,
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