Thursday, July 21, 2016

Did Women and Children Exist in Prehistory?

"The archaeological record tends to preserve stone tools rather than perishable remains,  such as this split-twig figurine found in Dolores Cave, near Gunnison, Colorado." Image Courtesy of Sapiens and the Denver Museum of Nature & Science (A1291.1).
"The archaeological record tends to preserve stone tools rather than perishable remains,
such as this split-twig figurine found in Dolores Cave, near Gunnison, Colorado."
Image Courtesy of Sapiens and the Denver Museum of Nature & Science (A1291.1). 
June 15, 2016.
Stephen E. Nash, of SAPIENS, has written a thoughtful article about the importance of including women and children in archaeological interpretations of the past.

"I have long been troubled by archaeological research on Paleoindian North America, where Clovis, Folsom, and other projectile-point styles, dating from about 13,000 to 9,000 years ago, are analyzed as if no other technologies existed. Part of this emphasis on projectile points is a function of preservation—whereas kill sites, hunting camps, bones, and stone tools are reasonably well-preserved across the American West, Paleoindian campsites are rare, and perishable remains (e.g., nets, baskets, clothing, shoes, etc.) are even rarer..."

To read the full articleclick here.

For more information,
Visit:

Wednesday, July 20, 2016

Summer Trip: The Ancient Ohio Trail Route | Chillicothe Area

The Ancient Ohio Trail Route | Chillicothe Area

These itineraries suggest many opportunities to extend, deepen, and customize your travel throughout Ohio. Enjoy "early Ohio" sites like historic inns, ancient roads tracing American Indian and settlers pathways, plus canals, historic sites and early industries.

This route consists of five optional sites:
  1. Historic Downtown
  2. Water Street
  3. Ross County Museum
  4. Belleview Avenue
  5. Story Mound
The Ancient Ohio Trail
For more information, visit: The Ancient Ohio Trail.

Mound City, Hopewell Culture National Historical Park. Image Courtesy of Tim Black.
Mound City, Hopewell Culture National Historical Park.
Image Courtesy of Tim Black.
is close by if you want to add it to your trip!

For more information about UNESCO World Heritage, 

Wednesday, July 13, 2016

Summer Trip: The Ancient Ohio Trail Route | Lower Scioto Valley

The Ancient Ohio Trail Route | Lower Scioto Valley

These itineraries suggest many opportunities to extend, deepen, and customize your travel throughout Ohio. Enjoy "early Ohio" sites like historic inns, ancient roads tracing American Indian and settlers pathways, plus canals, historic sites and early industries.

This route consists of seven optional sites:
  1. Three Locks Road
  2. Waverly
  3. Piketon Cemetery
  4. Barnes House
  5. Tremper Mound
  6. Portsmouth
  7. Old Fort Earthworks
The Ancient Ohio Trail
For more information, visit: The Ancient Ohio Trail.

Mound City, Hopewell Culture National Historical Park. Image Courtesy of Tim Black.
Mound City, Hopewell Culture National Historical Park.
Image Courtesy of Tim Black.
is close by if you want to add it to your trip!

For more information about UNESCO World Heritage, 

Tuesday, July 12, 2016

The Language of Native American Baskets from the weavers' view

http://nmai.si.edu/exhibitions/baskets/index.cfm

Introduction
"In earlier days, baskets accompanied Indian people throughout their lives. Babies were carried in baskets, meals were prepared and cooked in them, worldly goods were stored in them, and people were buried in them. As the scene described here by writer Peter Blue Cloud makes clear, many Native American people believe that baskets were not given to humankind during the Creation, but had already been part of the world for many eternities. Today, baskets serve as markers of cultural pride and inheritance. Some are used on religious occasions. And hundreds of weavers make baskets for sale.

I began this exhibition with the idea that we can understand baskets through the details of their making—the weavers’ view. This idea is based upon a knowledge of baskets gained through many years of conversations with weavers, observation, and hands-on learning. Understanding basketmaking as process offers a means to see the interrelation of conception, creation, and expression.

Objects for the exhibition were then preliminarily selected and laid-out and five Native basket-makers and one Native basketry scholar were invited to a two-day seminar to review the proposed contents and organization. While the basic outline of the exhibition remained constant, the consulting curators honed my ideas and choices. Above all, they wished to see more contemporary baskets on view. They wanted to make clear that basketry is a living art, and that the baskets in the Museum’s collections remain rooted in their cultures, no matter how long ago they were made, used, purchased, and removed from their communities.... "
-Bruce Bernstein, Assistant Director for Cultural Resources, 
National Museum of the American Indian.

The Weavers' View
Each weavers' view includes a selection of 7-8 images of contemporary and historic baskets.

  • Lisa Telford, Haida
  • Pat Courtney Gold, Wasco Nation of the Warm Springs Confederacy
  • Julia Parker, Pomo & Sherrie Smith-Ferri, Dry Creek Pomo and Bodega Bay Miwok
  • Terrol Johnson, Tohono O'odham
  • Theresa Hoffman, Penobscot

Techniques, Tools & Workplaces

  • Techniques
    • 45 baskets
    • Plaiting
    • Wicker
    • Twining
    • Coiling
  • Tools & Workplaces

The Weavers' Aesthetic

  • Materials
    • 20 baskets
  • Starts & Finishes
    • 20 baskets
  • Splices & Workfaces
    • 10 baskets
  • Shape
    • 12 baskets
  • Design Field
    • 16 baskets
    • “I always point out that at one time the designs were new, people had to absorb them. But because we have been doing them for so long, now they’re considered traditional.”-Terrol Johnson, Tohono O’odham

Burden Baskets

  • 30 baskets
  • Open burden baskets
  • Closed burden baskets
  • Hats and small burden baskets

A Set of Values

  • 25 baskets
  • "Too often, when people think about Native American baskets, they assume that the weavers who make them are hemmed in by rules that govern the “traditional” arts. Nothing could be further from the truth. Tradition is not a list of rules, but rather a set of values that guide the weaver’s work."

Basketmaking Associations

Wednesday, July 6, 2016

Summer Trip: The Ancient Ohio Trail Route | Athens, Hocking Valley

The Ancient Ohio Trail Route | Athens, Hocking Valley

These itineraries suggest many opportunities to extend, deepen, and customize your travel throughout Ohio. Enjoy "early Ohio" sites like historic inns, ancient roads tracing American Indian and settlers pathways, plus canals, historic sites and early industries.

This route consists of seven optional sites:
  1. Leo Petroglyphs
  2. Buckeye Furnace
  3. Zaleski Mound
  4. Logan
  5. Nelsonville
  6. The Plains
  7. Athens
The Ancient Ohio Trail
For more information, visit: The Ancient Ohio Trail.

Mound City, Hopewell Culture National Historical Park. Image Courtesy of Tim Black.
Mound City, Hopewell Culture National Historical Park.
Image Courtesy of Tim Black.
is close by if you want to add it to your trip!

For more information about UNESCO World Heritage, 

Tuesday, July 5, 2016

Midwest American Indian & Earthworks Video

"Tribal Participation in the Preservation of the Newark Earthworks" 
-Interim Director Marti Chaatsmith February 18, 2015

When researching a new topic or trying to find more information, finding videos with reliable sources is difficult. Midwest American Indian & Earthworks Videos is our attempt at collating 
free, online, informational videos about American Indian cultures, particularly from the Great Lakes, and monumental earthworks histories worldwide. These videos represent a small sample of current or recent knowledge and we hope you find them useful to introduce topics and terms for research, general knowledge, and to use as classroom resources. This is by no means a comprehensive list and links may be subject to change. As time passes, information is updated and 
so described conclusions may no longer be valid.

The full Midwest American Indian & Earthworks Videos tab is
always available on the right-hand side of our blog,
under the heading Collected Resources.



We welcome your input and would like to hear from you; 
please contact us at earthworks@osu.edu .

The views, opinions, and beliefs expressed within all articles, videos, and links from this blog
do not necessarily represent The Ohio State University or the Newark Earthworks Center.

Friday, July 1, 2016

Independence Day & Fireworks

"The annual Independence Day Concert and Fireworks display is held annually on July 3, on the campus of The Ohio State University at Newark and Central Ohio Technical College
The event is free and open to all, 6 PM-Dusk.

Approximately 10,000 Licking County children and families attend this fun, free, family friendly event annually. The evening’s celebration begins with popular local musical groups with all performances held at the Martha Grace Reese Amphitheater. Of course, the crowd-favorite fireworks display begins at dusk to the accompaniment of patriotic, favorite, musical selections.

Independence Day Concert & FireworksA number of local vendors will be serving food and beverages. The public is encouraged to bring lawn chairs, picnics and blankets for a fun-filled evening of music and entertainment. Free parking is available at the campus.


The annual Independence Day Concert and Fireworks is funded by the Reese Family Foundation, The Ohio State University at Newark and Central Ohio Technical College."

Best wishes for your holiday weekend from
 the Newark Earthworks Center!

Wednesday, June 29, 2016

Summer Trip: The Ancient Ohio Trail Route | Cincinnati, Little Miami


These itineraries suggest many opportunities to extend, deepen, and customize your travel throughout Ohio. Enjoy "early Ohio" sites like historic inns, ancient roads tracing American Indian and settlers pathways, plus canals, historic sites and early industries.

This route consists of eight optional sites:
  1. Cincinnati
  2. Mariemont
  3. Milford and Newtown
  4. Fosters Earthworks
  5. Turner Earthworks
  6. Stubbs Earthworks
  7. Hillsboro and Vicinity
  8. Fort Salem Earthworks
The Ancient Ohio Trail
For more information, visit: The Ancient Ohio Trail.

Fort Ancient.
Image Courtesy of Tim Black.
is close by if you want to add it to your trip!

For more information about UNESCO World Heritage,