Wednesday, May 26, 2021

Ohio Supreme Court to decide future of historic Newark Earthworks

 

Octagon State Memorial Map with key features labeled. Image Courtesy of the Ancient Ohio Trail.
Octagon State Memorial Map.
Image Courtesy of the Ancient Ohio Trail.

May 13, 2021.
Dennis Biviano, of Spectrum News, has written an exploratory article about the pending decision of the Ohio Supreme Court and the current rental lease of Ohio's officially recognized state prehistoric monument, the Newark Earthworks' Octagon State Memorial.

"[Eastern Band of] Cherokee professor of art education at Ohio State University, Dr. Christine Ballengee Morris has been an advocate for the Octagon Earthworks at Newark Earthworks for nearly three decades.

She also continues to fight for the mounds to be open to the public and deemed a World Heritage site.

“Access to the Octagon Mound has been the central key to all of this from the very beginning,” Ballengee Morris said. “It was because we wanted to use it, be there and invite people to come to this magnificent site, and the fact that it's the only earthen calendar in the world, is the Octagon Mound, and there's a golf course on it.” Since 1933, Ohio History Connection has owned the property, and leased it to the Moundbuilders Country Club. "
-Dennis Biviano, Spectrum News.

To read the full articleclick here.

For more information,
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Monday, May 24, 2021

UNESCO Honor for Ancient Earthworks Hits Snag

Map of the Newark Earthworks, Plate XXV. Ancient Monuments of the Mississippi Valley. Squier & Davis, Smithsonian Institute, 1848. Page 67.
Map of the Newark Earthworks, Plate XXV.
Ancient Monuments of the Mississippi Valley.
Squier & Davis, Smithsonian Institute, 1848. Page 67.

April 17, 2021.

Mary Annette Pember, of Indian Country Today, has reviewed the current situation of the Octagon State Memorial within her thoughtful article about the Ohio Supreme Court's pending ruling on the lease of Ohio's official state prehistoric monument.

"One thing stands between the 2,000-year-old Octagon Earthworks in Newark, Ohio, and a nomination to the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization’s (UNESCO) World Heritage List.
It’s a golf course that leased the land nearly 100 years ago."

To read the full articleclick here.

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Thursday, May 20, 2021

OSU-Newark's Dr. Low curates Chicago museum basket-making exhibit

May 16, 2021.
Kent Mallett, of the Newark Advocate, has written a brief article introducing the Field Museum's new temporary exhibit Pokagon Potawatomi Black Ash Baskets.

"The revered practice of basket weaving has been threatened during the last century by government policies and the emerald ash borer’s destruction of black ash trees used in basket making. This exhibit tells the story of Pokagon Potawatomi resilience and warns of calamitous impending environmental consequences."

To read the full articleclick here.

For more information,
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Thursday, April 15, 2021

Pokagon Potawatomi Black Ash Baskets: Our Storytellers

A mix of contemporary decorative baskets sitting inside a large, berry-picking basket. A small tied bundle of tobacco-a sacred medicine that cleanses, comforts, and offers protection-accompanies the baskets. Image courtesy of Dr. John N. Low.
A mix of contemporary decorative baskets sitting inside a large, berry-picking basket.
 A small tied bundle of tobacco-a sacred medicine that cleanses, comforts,
 and offers protection-accompanies the baskets.
Image courtesy of Dr. John N. Low.

Pokagon Potawatomi Black Ash Baskets: Our Storytellers opens to the public April 16, 2021 in the Maran Gallery near the Maori House.


In the last century, items of Native material culture have become items for non-Native collections, museums, and exhibitions-although they were often poorly labeled, identified, and understood. However, particularly since the 1990s, Native peoples have demanded a voice and authority in sharing the beauty, technology, and meaning of their art and artifacts. One of the powers in these objects includes the ability to facilitate conversations between peoples of different communities and backgrounds. The Field Museum has been an important example of the new way in which Natives and non-Natives collaborate on exhibitions about Indigenous cultures. This spring the Field Museum will open Pokagon Potawatomi Black Ash Baskets: Our Storytellers to further strengthen the transition to shared storytelling.

Many of the baskets in the exhibition will share their stories with visitors. This basket, crafted in the 1960s, shares that it was sold in order to help its maker earn a living. Image courtesy of Dr. John N. Low.
Many of the baskets in the exhibition
will share their stories with visitors.
This basket, crafted in the 1960s,
shares that it was sold in order to help its maker earn a living.
Image courtesy of Dr. John N. Low.

The Pokagon Potawatomi peoples are familiar with the traditions of our ancestors and know the multiplicity of stories within baskets. The baskets-assumed silent, static, and lifeless-speak to many of us. We have ears that will listen. We know the origins. The baskets are imbued with the spirit of the material and maker. We hear the stories that the basket waits to tell. A thank you prayer, spoken softly, a song sung to the basket as busy hands work the ash. Hands that lay down tobacco, weave strips into another life; scrape ribbons of wood until they are as smooth as satin. Listen for the voices that sing children to sleep, comfort a partner, worry over an elder, and pray. The hands heard weaving are the same hands that make bread and plant seeds for food. Seeds of knowledge and wisdom are also planted with these busy hands. Stories emanate from the baskets. Like the songs, prayers, and plantings of our grandmothers, we hear those stories. Because we know to listen. We know the songs the baskets sing.

This exhibition celebrates these baskets and their makers. It tells a story of survival and resilience. But it also contains a cautionary tale and a warning of environmental catastrophe as the emerald ash borer, an invasive beetle from Asia, decimates black ash populations in North America. What will the Pokagon Potawatomi make their iconic baskets out of if all the black ash trees are gone? That is a question that concerns us all.

 -Dr. John N. Low, Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Co-Curator and Basket Caretaker.

Wednesday, March 24, 2021

Post Doctorial Researcher Job Posting!

The Newark Earthworks Center at The Ohio State University Newark Campus, within the College of Arts and Sciences, seeks a Postdoctoral Researcher to join our team at The Ohio State University's Newark Earthworks Center for one year. 

Our Post Doctoral Research Job Posting!

[https://osu.wd1.myworkdayjobs.com/en-US/OSUCareers/job/Newark-Campus/Post-Doctoral-Researcher_R7332]

You can learn more about the Newark Earthworks Center, 

at https://go.osu.edu/newarkearthworks .

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The Newark Earthworks Center at the Ohio State University Newark campus invites applications for a one-year postdoctoral research position in any field that contributes to the mission and vision of the Newark Earthworks Center at The Ohio State University

We seek a dynamic, innovative scholar who specializes in indigenous perspectives. The successful candidate will be situated in interdisciplinary and cross-departmental conversations in comparative studies, American Indian studies, religious studies, environmental humanities, history, anthropology, etc. as appropriate. 

Because this is a research position, there will be no teaching obligation. The successful candidate will assist the Newark Earthworks Center in its activities, research, and grant responsibilities. 

Specifically, for a Collaborative Center grant awarded to the Center, the successful candidate’s activities will include a literature review related to the current understanding about American Indians in Ohio; identifying and documenting existing organizational resources in Ohio for the American Indian population, including American Indian Centers, American Indian organizations and American Indian Studies programs; development of open-ended interview sessions with leadership and/or staff of the organizations; documenting, compiling, and summarizing the interviews into relevant databases; producing a draft report on the research activities and developing materials and displays on the project’s affiliated websites with the Web Design Consultant, may also participate in design and installation of exhibits at the Newark campus LeFevre Art Gallery, and other research and activities as designated by the Director of the Center Dr. John Low.

Qualifications

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We invite applicants whose research focuses on any area of Indigenous Studies, including but not limited to indigeneity and environmentalism, indigenous art, expressions, and material cultures, traditional indigenous knowledges (TIK), diasporas, revitalizations, treaty rights, sovereignty and nationhood, citizenship and identity, and indigenous sexualities and gendered identities. 
Preferred candidates will be familiar with and comfortable with community-based participatory research (CPR) and other decolonizing methodologies and have a relationship with at least one indigenous community (reservation, rural, suburban, or urban). 
Applicants must have the PhD in hand August 15, 2021

This fellowship is made possible by Ohio State’s Global Arts + Humanities Discovery Theme

Additional Information: 
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Location: Founders Hall (0628) 

Position Type: Term (Fixed Term) 

Scheduled Hours: 40 Shift: Varying Shifts 

Salary Grade: Negotiable Grade Profile Annual 

For additional detail regarding the classification or salary grade, please click here

Final candidates are subject to successful completion of a background check. A drug screen, physical, or psychological screening may be required during the post offer process. 

The Ohio State University 

Office of Human Resources | 1590 N. High St., Suite 300 | Columbus, OH 43201-2190 | 

For questions, please call 614-247-6947 or email HRConnection@osu.edu 

The Ohio State University is an equal opportunity employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to age, ancestry, color, disability, ethnicity, gender identity or expression, genetic information, HIV/AIDS status, military status, national origin, race, religion, sex, gender, sexual orientation, pregnancy, protected veteran status, or any other bases under the law. 
Applicants are encouraged to complete and submit the Equal Employment Identification form (PDF). 
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Tuesday, February 9, 2021

Dakota and Ojibwe Skies Virtual Discussion | March 9th, 2021

You are invited to attend “Dakota and Ojibwe Skies” to learn how our American Indian ancestors used the moon, earthen architecture, and a turtle’s shell to predict astronomical events with remarkable precision. 

The virtual discussion will be led by Dr. Jim Rock, a citizen of the Dakota Nation, is a faculty member in the Department of Physics and Astronomy and Director of Indigenous Programming for the Marshall W. Alworth Planetarium at the University of Minnesota Duluth. In 2014 he co-authored the book Makoċe Wiċaŋḣpi Wowapi | D(L)akota Star Map Constellation Guide and has co-published several journal articles on Dakota sacred mound and cave sites.

 He will discuss both topics from his published works in addition to local connections with the Newark Earthworks and the Serpent Mound in Peebles, Ohio.





Free and Open to the Public.
 
7 to 8 p.m. 

Online Registration for this virtual event is required 
through the  Granville Public Library.

If you require an accommodation such as live captioning or interpretation to participate in this event, or other accommodations, please contact carpenter.554@osu.edu . 
Requests made by February 22 will help provide seamless access.
Blowing Off STEAM Logo.

This event is part of the Blowing off STEAM (science, technology, engineering, art, mathematics) informal community-based discussion series. Blowing off STEAM is a collaboration between The Ohio State University at Newark, Denison University, and the Granville Public Library. Also sponsored by the Newark Earthworks Center, the Department of Astronomy, and the Global Arts + Humanities/Indigenous Arts and Humanities Initiative.



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Thursday, February 4, 2021

Stepping Out and Stepping Up: The Land-Grant Truth and Reconciliation Project



First, Our team was one of 10 awardees from the initial round of The Ohio State University’s Seed Fund for Racial Justice.  

"We assert it is long past time for truth and reconciliation. In partnership with First Nations Development Institute, our expanded team seeks to open a path toward both a reckoning of this inglorious history within our university community, as well as the conversations necessary with the affected tribes to determine an appropriate path forward. To undertake this sort of work, we are also joined by John Low (Associate Professor of Comparative Studies, Director of the Newark Earthworks Center, and citizen of the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians), Marti Chaatsmith, (Associate Director of the Newark Earthworks Center, enrolled citizen of the Comanche Nation, and direct descendant of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma), and Casey Hoy (Kellogg Endowed Chair in Agricultural Ecosystem Management, professor of Entomology, and faculty Director of InFACT).

Working directly with Michael Roberts, the president and CEO of First Nations Development Institute, we will connect with Tribal Nations across the U.S.—who were removed from Ohio or whose land was granted to Ohio State—to facilitate new dialogue between Native peoples and representatives of our university. In so doing, we will develop an initial understanding of what specific reparative actions would most benefit the Native American communities impacted by this land dispossession, particularly with respect to food security and sovereignty, and the process by which it could be jointly designed.

We also will be advancing an enhanced land acknowledgment statement that moves our university away from its current “past tense” and more sentimental recognition of transgressions. Our aim would be to routinely remind the Ohio State community regarding the pervasiveness of colonialism and the opportunity to foster a mindfulness of our present-day obligations, thus promoting a more genuine relationship upon which future interactions with indigenous communities can be based.

Finally, because we see this work as only the very beginning of a longer and more comprehensive university response, we will undertake a series of planning efforts as well. This includes the formulation of a demonstration/research project at the Newark Earthworks Center regarding indigenous farming practices, with attention to how traditional practices may improve food sovereignty in Native American communities today, and the incorporation of indigenous agricultural wisdom and practices into a new Sustainable Agriculture major and modern agricultural practices more broadly. We also will be recommending to Ohio State and the State of Ohio a reconciliation plan, outlining both the people and processes required for progress to occur.

We can't change the history regarding how the State of Ohio and Ohio State University came to be, but we can certainly take steps to honestly acknowledge that history, including those who were wronged in the process, and begin to make amends in meaningful ways. This is ultimately the greatest challenge any person, organization or society faces, to step out of our comfort zones and step up purposefully to take responsibility and reconcile injustices to the extent possible. Future Buckeyes would expect nothing less as they look back on our efforts to address this situation today."

Our Partners:

First Nations Development Institute improves economic conditions for Native Americans through direct financial grants, technical assistance, training, advocacy, and policy.

Link to First Nations Development Institute.


Initiative for Food and Agricultural Transformation (InFACT) is a transdisciplinary program at The Ohio State University aimed at designing and implementing food systems that are sustainable, defined as achieving a balance of ecology, economy, technology and culture to promote the overall well-being of people, animals and the natural environment.

Link to the Initiative for Food and AgriCultural Transformation (InFACT).

College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences Today, our world-class teaching, research, and outreach -- the everyday work of our college -- impacts local, state, national, and global communities. Our goal is to be the standard of excellence for colleges of food, agricultural and environmental sciences.

College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Services.







Deliverables from this project will include:

Outcome 1: Leveraging First Nations Development Institute’s connections with Tribal Nations across the U.S. – who were removed from Ohio or whose land was granted to Ohio State – to facilitate new dialogue between Native peoples and representatives of our university.

Outcome 2: Developing an initial understanding of what specific reparative actions would most benefit the Native American communities impacted by this land dispossession and the process by which it could be jointly designed. Findings from this immediate deliverable will be reported in both scholarly publications and presentations at professional conferences, as well as a workbook for use by other land-grant universities in planning for their own reparation activities.

Outcome 3: Advancing a Land Acknowledgment statement that moves our university away from its current “past tense” and more sentimental recognition of transgressions and toward an indigenous relationship that reminds the Ohio State community about the pervasiveness of colonialism and the opportunity to foster a mindfulness of our present-day obligations, thus establishing a more genuine relationship upon which future interactions can be based.

Outcome 4: Formulating a demonstration/research project at Newark Earthworks regarding indigenous farming practices, with attention to how traditional practices may improve food sovereignty in Native American communities, and the incorporation of indigenous agricultural practices into a new College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences Sustainable Agriculture major and modern agricultural practices.

Outcome 5: Recommending to Ohio State and the State of Ohio a reconciliation plan with both the people and process required for progress and plan elements that may include, for example: a) providing economic development and technical assistance to tribal families and communities; b) assisting with innovative strategies for land tenure and financing of Native American food system infrastructure; and c) designing a scholarship program for indigenous people whose families and tribal communities have been affected by university-related dispossession.

"Toward Truth and Reconciliation: Present-Day Indigenous Peoples in Ohio"

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Second, our team received a Collaborative Centers Grant from Ohio State’s Global Arts + Humanities Discovery Theme. This second award was the result of an emerging partnership with the Ohio State University’s Humanities Institute

The release of the Land-Grab Universities Report by High Country News in March 2020 has been accompanied by mounting calls to bring justice in response to the harm visited upon Native Americans during the establishment of states and land-grant universities. In this project, the Newark Earthworks Center seeks to fund a post-doctoral position that would create dialogue both within the Ohio State community and among other land-grant institutions on the truth and reconciliation topics as they relate to Indigenous peoples. Submitted in partnership with the Humanities Institute, this effort is designed in part to help build reciprocity and redistribution methodologies and engage in other humanities-based scholarship surrounding tribal issues and land-grant universities.

Humanities Institute facilitates collaboration and interdisciplinary inquiry into some of the most pressing problems facing contemporary society. The Institute provides an organizational home for a number of interdisciplinary centers, and facilitates the formation of new centers, new constellations of humanities faculty. With roots in the traditional disciplines of the humanities, the Institute provides a structure for long-term research projects that draw on humanistic methodologies to engage communities on and beyond campus. The Humanities Institute serves as an incubator of collaborative research.

Link to the Humanities Institute, The Ohio State University.






Deliverables from this project will include:

Outcome 1: A web-based catalogue of Native American-serving agencies and organizations in Ohio, as well as a more refined understanding of the various constituencies served by these enterprises.

Outcome 2: The web-based presentation of the historical sweep of American Indians in Ohio, including the development of a narrative concerning their adaptation to geographical separation from their tribes and lack of recognition and support from the State of Ohio regarding their existence and needs.

Outcome 3: Creation of an exhibit – curated by Newark Earthworks Center Director John N. Low [Pokagon Band of Potawatomi] – detailing the ancestral Native peoples of the region and the work of the NEC that will be shown at the LeFevre Gallery on the Newark campus (to be shown virtually if future shutdowns due to Covid-19 are mandated).

Outcome 4: One keynote presentation and one panel discussion that will focus attention on the scholarly work that addresses past and present colonialism within and among land-grant universities. The presentation and panel discussions will be held live (virtually), will involve some of the most prominent voices in this area and will be recorded and placed on the NEC website.

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Wednesday, October 7, 2020

Indigenous Peoples Day – Monday, October 12, 2020. From the OSU Newark Earthworks Center

Computer projection of the lunar standstill at the Octagon State Memorial, Newark Earthworks. Image created by CERHAS, University of Cincinnati.
Computer projection of the lunar standstill at the Octagon State Memorial, Newark Earthworks.
Image created by CERHAS, University of Cincinnati.

Happy Indigenous Peoples’ Day!

WHAT IS INDIGENOUS PEOPLES’ DAY AND WHO CELEBRATES IT? 

Indigenous Peoples’ Day is a holiday celebrated on the second Monday of October in the United States, in lieu of Columbus Day. Indigenous Peoples’ Day, at its core, aims to celebrate and honor the past, present, and futures of Native peoples throughout the United States and acknowledges the legacy of colonialism, which has devastated Indigenous communities historically and continues to negatively impact them today. More importantly, however, Indigenous Peoples’ Day moves beyond the narrative of oppression and honors the histories, cultures, contributions, and resilience of contemporary Native peoples. 

WHY IS CELEBRATING INDIGENOUS PEOPLES’ DAY IMPORTANT 

Celebrating Indigenous Peoples’ Day in lieu of Columbus Day has three obvious benefits: 
  1. It promotes the visibility of Natives peoples and counters the narrative that we are a vanishing race or curiosities from the past. Native peoples are here! 
  2. Celebrating Indigenous Peoples’ Day connects diverse Indigenous peoples in the United States together in a common celebration of their Native heritages. 
  3. It connects Indigenous peoples in the U.S. to other Native peoples around the world. 
 Indigenous Peoples’ Day de-mythologizes the arrival of Columbus and Europeans to the Western Hemisphere and rightly celebrates the first peoples of these lands. 


 with Dr. Melissa Beard Jacob and Dr. Daniel Rivers 12-12:30
Zoom Registration required; This event is free and open to the public.


If you require an accommodation such as live captioning or interpretation to participate in this webinar, please contact Clara Davison at davison.102@osu.edu or 614-688-1214. Requests made two weeks before an event will generally allow us to provide seamless access, but the university will make every effort to meet all requests.

Unable to join the event live? No worries, register anyway. All registrants will receive a recording of the webinar and additional resources following the event.