Thursday, November 3, 2022

#LandBack: Histories of Restoring Indigenous Presence Webinar with Dr. Doug Kiel

November 17, 2022
7 PM EST (6 PM CT)

Free and open to the public.

Dr. Doug Kiel (Oneida Nation), Northwestern University. Image Courtesy of Dr. Kiel.The Newark Earthworks Center is hosting Dr. Doug Kiel (Oneida Nation), Northwestern University, who will present "#LandBack: Histories of Restoring Indigenous Presence" on Zoom at 7 PM EST.

Register on Zoom at https://go.osu.edu/landback !  

Land is at the heart of Indigenous identities, and histories of U.S. colonialism are largely defined by attempts to separate Native people from their collective inheritance. Native communities have reacquired territory through a variety of means in recent years, which has often been met with resentful opposition at the local level. The Land Back movement is nonetheless gaining steam, accruing victories, and making a better world. This present-day movement has roots that reach deep into the past, and has high stakes for the future. Land is at the heart of Indigenous identities, and histories of U.S. colonialism are largely defined by attempts to separate Native people from their collective inheritance. Native communities have reacquired territory through a variety of means in recent years, which has often been met with resentful opposition at the local level. The Land Back movement is nonetheless gaining steam, accruing victories, and making a better world. This present-day movement has roots that reach deep into the past, and has high stakes for the future.

7:00 – 8:00 PM EST 
Carmen Zoom, Registration Required

We strive to host inclusive, accessible events that enable all individuals, including individuals with disabilities, to engage fully. To request an accommodation or for inquiries about accessibility, please contact Dr. John Low at 740-755-7857 or low.89@osu.edu . At least two weeks' advance notice will help us to provide seamless access.

There will be 15 minutes for a Question and Answer session at the end of the webinar. Please submit your questions in the chat.

Dr. Doug Kiel (Ph.D., University of Wisconsin–Madison, 2012) is a citizen of the Oneida Nation and studies Native American history, with particular interests in the Great Lakes region and twentieth century Indigenous nation rebuilding. He is working on a book manuscript entitled Unsettling Territory: Oneida Indian Resurgence and Anti-Sovereignty Backlash. The Oneida Nation of Wisconsin, a community that had been dispossessed of their New York homelands in the early nineteenth century, yet again suffered devastating land losses as a result of the Dawes Act of 1887—a policy that President Theodore Roosevelt once called “a mighty pulverizing engine to break up the tribal mass.” Kiel’s book examines how the Oneida Nation’s leaders strengthened the community’s capacity to shape their own future by envisioning, deliberating, and enacting a dramatic reversal of fortune during the twentieth century. His book also examines the origins of recent litigation between the Oneida Nation and the Village of Hobart, a mostly non-Native municipality that is located within the boundaries of the Oneida Reservation and seeks to block the tribe from recovering land that was lost a century ago.

Speaker series as part of Indigenous Ohio: OSU and Native Arts and Humanities Past and Present grant.  Sponsored by the Newark Earthworks Center and the Global Arts + Humanities Discovery Theme.

Kind thanks to Jared Gardner Department of English and Director of Popular Culture Studies for assisting in set up and hosting this web presentation.

Thursday, October 27, 2022

Muskrat versus Canary: The Future of Federal Indian Law Webinar with Dr. Matthew Fletcher

November 10, 2022

7 PM EST

Free and open to the public.

Dr. Matthew Fletcher (Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians), University of Michigan. Image Courtesy of Dr. Fletcher..The Newark Earthworks Center is hosting Dr. Matthew Fletcher (Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians), University of Michigan, who will present "Muskrat versus Canary: The Future of Federal Indian Law" on Zoom at 7 PM EST.

Register on Zoom at https://go.osu.edu/muskrat .

Federal Indian law and policy is marked by dramatic confrontations between paradigms described metaphorically, such as George Washington's "Savage as the Wolf" policy or Felix Cohen's "Miner's Canary" parable. These metaphors reflect that reality that federal Indian law and policy was imposed on tribal nations, usually without their consent or consultation. Even today, five decades after the beginning of the tribal self-determination era, the Miner's Canary parable remains the most-used shorthand metaphorical shorthand to describe Indigenous affairs in the United States But in my view, those metaphors are no longer useful to describe tribal nations. Tribal nations now possess agency and, occasionally, significant political and economic power. Congress and the Executive branch have largely embraced and enabled tribal self-determination. The United States Supreme Court has not. Or has it? Tribal nations have fared better in the Supreme Court since 2014 than in any other period of American history. Even so, the Court is paradigmatically split. In my scholarship, I have adopted the Anishinaabe creation story about the lowly, but heroic, Muskrat as my metaphor to describe modern tribal nations. The Supreme Court is poised to either accept and enable the new paradigm of tribal self-determination or eradicate it in favor of keeping tribal nations weak and passive. It is a paradigmatic battle of the Muskrat versus the Canary.

7:00 – 8:00 PM EST
Carmen Zoom, Registration Required.

We strive to host inclusive, accessible events that enable all individuals, including individuals with disabilities, to engage fully. To request an accommodation or for inquiries about accessibility, please contact Dr. John Low at 740-755-7857 or low.89@osu.edu . At least two weeks' advance notice will help us to provide seamless access.

There will be 15 minutes for a Question and Answer session at the end of the webinar. Please submit your questions in the chat.

Matthew L.M. Fletcher (Grand Traverse Band citizen), is the Harry Burns Hutchins Collegiate Professor of Law at Michigan Law. He teaches and writes in the areas of federal Indian law, American Indian tribal law, Anishinaabe legal and political philosophy, constitutional law, federal courts, and legal ethics, and he sits as the Chief Justice of the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians and the Poarch Band of Creek Indians.

Professor Fletcher also sits as an appellate judge for the Cabazon Band of Mission Indians, the Colorado River Indian Tribes, the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, the Hoopa Valley Tribe, the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe, the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe, the Match-E-Be-Nash-She-Wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians, the Nottawaseppi Huron Band of Potawatomi Indians, the Rincon Band of Luiseño Indians, the Santee Sioux Tribe of Nebraska, and the Tulalip Tribes

Speaker series as part of Indigenous Ohio: OSU and Native Arts and Humanities Past and Present grant.  Sponsored by the Newark Earthworks Center and the Global Arts + Humanities Discovery Theme.

Kind thanks to Jared Gardner Department of English and Director of Popular Culture Studies for assisting in set up and hosting this web presentation.

Monday, October 3, 2022

October 16, 2022: Octagon Open House

The Octagon State Memorial, Newark Earthworks Map. Image courtesy of the Ancient Ohio Trail.
The Octagon State Memorial, Newark Earthworks Map.
Image courtesy of the Ancient Ohio Trail.

The Octagon State Memorial is one of the most spectacular surviving remnants of the Newark Earthworks. The Octagon is connected to a perfectly circular enclosure 1,054 feet in diameter. The architecture of the Octagon Earthworks encodes a sophisticated understanding of geometry and astronomy. It is a National Historical Landmark and is on track to become a World Heritage site! Portions of the Octagon Earthworks is open to the public during daylight hours 365 days a year, but much of the site is used as a private golf course for most of the year, so access is restricted. Four times each year, however, golfing is suspended and the entire site is made available to the general public.

The site will be open daylight to dusk. 
Please revisit the Ohio History Connection closer to the open house date.


At 2 PM Director of the Newark Earthworks Center Dr. John Low will be giving a guided tour

Dr. Low (left in bright green) giving a tour to the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Elder's Council, 2014. Image courtesy of Timothy E. Black.
Dr. Low (left in bright green) giving a tour
to the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Elder's Council, 2014.
Image courtesy of Timothy E. Black.
















Take your tour with you through:

The Ancient Ohio Trail.

For more information, visit: 
https://www.ohiohistory.org/visit/museum-and-site-locator/newark-earthworks .

Thursday, September 29, 2022

Our Storytellers Bodéwadmi Wisgat Gokpenagen The Black Ash Baskets of the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians Exhibit Opening

Three baskets made of splints from the Black Ash tree. Some strips are colored a deep brown and a soft black. Image courtesy of the Newark Earthworks Center, The Ohio State University.
October 10, 2022

4 PM

Free and Open to the Public.

Celebrate Indigenous Peoples' Day with us!!!

Bricker Hall Lobby

190 North Oval Mall | Columbus, OH 43210

Potawatomi basket making is a reclamation and recovery of a powerful piece of native knowledge and technology and represents a potent counter-colonial and counter-hegemonic act with lasting implications. This exhibit reflects an understanding that objects are not lifeless things that occupy space. They have spirit and meaning. Centered upon intellectual and material property, basket weaving is an opportunity for Native women and men to make their own histories by using the past to "read the present.

This exhibit is curated by Director of the Newark Earthworks Center John N. Low, PhD, associate professor in Comparative Studies at The Ohio State University and enrolled citizen of the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi.

Sponsored by The Newark Earthworks Center with support from an Indigenous Arts and Humanities Grant by the Global Arts + Humanities Discovery Theme.

For more information,
Visit:

Wednesday, September 21, 2022

Food Sovereignty Workshop October 13-14, 2022

Pile of sweet corn with husks and tassels still attached. Image courtesy of The Ohio State University.

9:00AM - 4:00PM

Locations: OSU Thompson Library (Day 1) and the STEAM Factory (Day 2)

Registration required

If you are interested in the cultural contexts of local food systems and exploring cross-cultural, community-partnered fieldwork, this workshop is for you! The workshop will take place over the course of two days and will be an opportunity for participants to deepen their understanding, form partnerships, and begin taking action right away. We will explore how the assets local communities bring to these projects can transform research. Speakers will share examples of what working towards food sovereignty can look like in diverse local/global contexts, including the U.S. and Yemen. We will look at a variety of practices and contexts for cross-cultural interdisciplinary partnerships. 

You can check out the program here. 

Please register now

Globally, 27% of people faced moderate or severe food insecurity in 2019, representing more than 2 billion people. Community-Centered Approaches for Food Systems Transformation will be framed around the question: “How we might reprioritize research and teaching based on community partnership rather than "expertise?” In other words, how might learning from communities take precedence over learning about them. The workshop will focus on the cultural contexts of local food systems and will look at cases in the U.S., the Middle East, and other regions.

We will examine a variety of practices, including historic food production, projects in urban areas, and others. Food security is especially urgent for indigenous communities worldwide, many of whom continue to bear the burdens of displacement from their native lands. For example, 1 in 4 Native Americans in the U.S. is food insecure (Stanger-McLaughlin et al., 2021).

The purpose of the workshop is to shed light on research and grassroots projects that address this urgent crisis, highlighting the work currently being done by communities around the world to produce nutrition-dense, culturally relevant cuisine. Headlining the workshop is Dr. Brandy Phipps, Research Assistant Professor of Food, Nutrition, and Health – Agriculture Research Development Program, Central State University who will serve as the keynote speaker, focusing on the SUSHI food sovereignty project she is leading in partnership with the Menominee Tribal College of Wisconsin. Dr. Phipps is an inspiring model of leadership. Learn more about her work in this short video.

Dr. Phipps' keynote will be followed by a conversation between experienced researchers doing work in community food systems in the U.S., Belize, and Yemen, and moderated by an expert in community food security. They will shed light on research and grassroots projects that address this urgent crisis, highlighting the work currently being done by communities around the world to produce nutrient-dense, culturally relevant cuisine.

Speakers bios:

Brandy Phipps
Research Assistant Professor of Food, Nutrition, and Health – Agriculture Research Development Program, Central State University
Dr. Phipps is an Assistant Professor with a research focus on a) the intersection of climate change, nutrition/health equity, and food systems transformation; and b) holistic interactions of biomolecules in plant extracts and foods and the mechanisms of biomolecules in the prevention/alleviation of disease. Dr. Phipps is Project Director on a $10 M USDA-funded project and Co-Pi on $1.5 M in additional USDA- and FDA-funded projects. She has 20+ years of higher education teaching experience in the Biological and Life Sciences, and currently teaches Anatomy and Physiology, Nutrition, and Undergraduate Research classes. She is particularly passionate about providing educational equity, advanced experiential STEM learning opportunities, and personalized mentoring to PEER students and those who have been socially and economically disadvantaged. Dr. Phipps is an inspiring model of leadership. Her current work includes leading a transdisciplinary team focused on food systems transformation which includes significant work to support food sovereignty efforts of the Menominee Nation. Learn more about her work in this short video.

Brian Kowalkowski
Dean, Department of Continuing Education
College of Menominee Nation
Brian Kowalkowski started at College of Menominee Nation in 2007 as Assistant Director of Education Outreach Extension. Prior to that he worked for the Menominee Tribal Government for nine years, first as a land use planner and then as a community resource planner. His current position as Dean of Continuing Education requires him to manage and administer all grants and contracts of the department and act as the Extension Director. He analyzes community data to determine appropriate activities to be undertaken by the department. He also works with different community agencies to establish cooperative working relationships. A major accomplishment has been the creation of a local farmers market on the Menominee Reservation that has coincided with the improvement of access to fresh foods. He is involved with numerous local, state and federal professional organizations, representing his college and 1994 Tribal Land Grant schools.

Daniel Varisco
President, American Institute for Yemeni Studies
Anthropologist, Historian
Dr. Daniel M. Varisco will discuss what local food systems can look like in the context of Yemen. Dr. Varisco is an anthropologist with field research and extensive experience in Yemen regarding traditional agricultural systems and their intersection with policy & politics. He is also a historian and Arabist who has edited and translated mediaeval Rasulid agricultural texts and other Arab scholarship. He is experienced as a consultant to the World Bank (conservation and food security) and USAID. He will draw on his experience with community involvement in development projects and the successes of grassroots efforts. Besides Yemen, he has conducted research in Egypt, Qatar, and the UAE. https://ias.academia.edu/DanielVarisco

Kareem M. Usher, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
College of Engineering / Austin E. Knowlton School of Architecture City and Regional Planning Section
Dr. Kareem M. Usher is an Assistant Professor of City and Regional Planning at the Knowlton School of Architecture. His academic identity can be described as a public scholar who strives to create a peaceful, just and loving world by reducing human suffering through community-engaged planning research - the co-production of knowledge between community members and faculty, with the site of inquiry being food systems at the neighbourhood scale. Dr. Usher’s research focuses on urban food systems and he engages this topic at the intersection of food access, social justice, regional governance and community economic development. Methodologically, his work incorporates compassion as a planning approach and ‘action research’ or community-engaged scholarship. By working with communities on food systems in real places and in real-time, he has developed a body of empirical work that provides the foundation for an emergent research programme at the intersections of community development, theory and praxis. His work has spanned geographies: rural-suburban-urban, Global South-Global North, Mid-western-Southern United States; cultures and socio-economic groups: African American, Appalachian, Non-Hispanic European, and Indigenous Peoples: Belizean ethnic groups – Kriol, Garifuna, and Maya (Q’echi). Acknowledging that there remains much to know and understand in order to address ‘wicked’ social problems and effect sustainable change, Dr. Usher employs compassionate community engagement to uncover and lift up new ways of knowing – new epistemologies co-created with citizens who are the experts in their communities.

Moderator:

Mary Rodriguez
Associate Professor
Department of Agricultural Communication, Education, and Leadership

The workshop will take place over the course of two days and will be an opportunity for participants to deepen their understanding, form partnerships, and begin taking action right away. The conversations from day 1 will continue on day 2, which is geared towards turning all of this information and discussion into new activities by facilitating new collaborations. Some outcomes we might achieve by 3:00 on Friday include: new course development, teams formed around aspects of current programs, new grant/funded project proposal teams formed, institutional pathways for more equitable research, and whatever the assets and creativity each person brings to the table can achieve. To continue the discussion after the workshop, we are partnering with Columbus’ Growing and Growth Collective on a film series focused on food sovereignty projects locally and around the world.

Scientists, economists, historians, public health experts, etc., are welcome! We will consider how food systems, eco-systems, cultures and economies are mutually sustaining. Speakers from communities in the U.S., the Middle East, and other parts of the world will share their work in food sovereignty and what it means, both in its local context and implications for the rest of the world. Topics for discussion will follow this framework:Achieving nutrient density and health outcomes through food sovereignty projects while addressing historic inequities.
Sustaining culturally relevant food sovereignty through effective collaboration, ethical knowledge sharing, and education.
What makes successful cross-cultural partnerships and the best results in terms of knowledge, prosperity, and health outcomes.

The speakers will discuss what food sovereignty means to their cultural heritage and the role cross-cultural partnerships may play. We will therefore be looking at examples of both cross-cultural community building and transdisciplinary collaboration. We will follow up the workshop with action steps such as grant writing, educational activities, and support for food sovereignty work locally and in other parts of the world. 

Will you join us? Hold your spot now: mesc.osu.edu/form/food-sovereignty-workshop-regist

A Multi-unit Collaboration!

This food sovereignty workshop is brought to you by a partnership between University Libraries, the Global Water Institute, and the Middle East Studies Center. Our partnership with the Growing and Growth Collective supports this workshop and the film series on Food Sovereignty we will be co-hosting (More details coming!). 

Many thanks to our co-sponsors without whom this event would not have been possible. They include:

Sunday, July 3, 2022

July 25, 2022: Octagon Open House

The Octagon State Memorial, Newark Earthworks Map. Image courtesy of the Ancient Ohio Trail.
The Octagon State Memorial, Newark Earthworks Map.
Image courtesy of the Ancient Ohio Trail.

The Octagon State Memorial is one of the most spectacular surviving remnants of the Newark Earthworks. The Octagon is connected to a perfectly circular enclosure 1,054 feet in diameter. The architecture of the Octagon Earthworks encodes a sophisticated understanding of geometry and astronomy. It is a National Historical Landmark and is on track to become a World Heritage site! Portions of the Octagon Earthworks is open to the public during daylight hours 365 days a year, but much of the site is used as a private golf course for most of the year, so access is restricted. Four times each year, however, golfing is suspended and the entire site is made available to the general public.

The site will be open daylight to dusk. 
Details are pending. 
Please revisit the Ohio History Connection closer to the open house date.

Tuesday, April 12, 2022

Wombed Hollows, Sacred Trees: Burial Mounds and Processual Indigenous Subjectivity & Earthworks Tour

Dr. Chadwick Allen, University of Washington. Image courtesy of Dr. Chadwick Allen.

Thursday, April 14, 4-6PM | 18th Avenue Library with Zoom Livestream

Since the eighteenth century, settler cultures have represented North American burial mounds as ancient “mysteries” and historical “enigmas”—sites of Indigenous vanishing that provide settlers with opportunities for creating scientific discovery, economic profit, and cautionary tales of angry ghosts from “lost” civilizations. But there are other narratives to tell about these sophisticated earthworks, other conceptual frames for understanding not only their functions as technologies for interment but also their ongoing power as symbols for Indigenous presence. Drawing from his new book Earthworks Rising: Mound Building in Native Literature and Arts, Chadwick Allen analyzes works by contemporary Native writers and artists that demonstrate Indigenous conceptions of interment within mounded earth. These provocative “earth”-works unsettle dominant narratives by reactivating Indigenous understandings of burial mounds as active sites of renewal and regeneration.

For more information and registration, visit go.osu.edu/allen
or scan the QR Code below
QR Code link to https://go.osu.edu/allen


Register for the event IN-PERSON here.

Register for Session 1 VIA ZOOM here.

All events sponsored by the CSR are free and open to the public. This event is co-sponsored with the American Indian Studies Program in the Center for Ethnic Studies.

The Zoom livestream of this event will be presented with automated closed captions. If you wish to request traditional CART services or other accommodations, please contact religion@osu.edu. Requests made by about 10 days before the event will generally allow us to provide seamless access, but the university will make every effort to meet requests made after this date.

Starting at 6 p.m. Friday, March 11, masks will be optional in most indoor spaces on The Ohio State University campuses, including residence halls, dining facilities, classrooms, offices and the Ohio Union. In settings where masks are optional, students, faculty, staff and visitors can decide on an individual basis whether or not they will continue to wear a mask.



And don't miss the Newark Earthworks Tour!

Saturday, April 16, 10AM | OSU Newark Campus

The Center for the Study of Religion is thrilled to be sponsoring a curated tour of Newark Earthworks with guest scholar Chadwick Allen and Director of the Newark Earthworks Center, John Low. 

The tour will begin at 10am with lunch to follow at the Newark campus. 

Anyone interested in a bus ride leaving from the Ohio Union should contact our Program Coordinator, Nick Spitulski, at religion@osu.edu.

For those who would like to attend this event, please RSVP to our email at religion@osu.edu. All those who RSVP will be receiving updated information about meeting times via email. Those who wish to drive on their own and meet us at the Newark campus should also RSVP and will receive updated information closer to the event date.

Email religion@osu.edu to RSVP and for additional information; or visit the the Department of Religion.

This event is hosted by the Center for the Study of Religion and the American Indian Studies program.

Tuesday, March 29, 2022

April 10th Artist Gerry Lang Gallery Talk & Octagon Open House!

Celebrate the first Octagon Open House of the year with us and enjoy a gallery talk with artist Gerry Lang at the LeFevre Art Gallery with the "Return from Exile: the Mixed-Blood art of Gerry Lang"!
 
Image of the Octagon State Memorial earthworks, Newark Ohio. Link opens to the event flyer but text is also written below. Image courtesy of The Ohio State University.
The Octagon State Memorial is one of the most spectacular surviving remnants of the Newark Earthworks. The Octagon is connected to a perfectly circular enclosure 1,054 feet in diameter. The architecture of the Octagon Earthworks encodes a sophisticated understanding of geometry and astronomy. It is a National Historical Landmark and is on track to become a World Heritage site! Portions of the Octagon Earthworks is open to the public during daylight hours 365 days a year, but much of the site is used as a private golf course for most of the year, so access is restricted. Four times each year, however, golfing is suspended and the entire site is made available to the general public.

The Ancient Ohio Trail
Take your tour with you!
The site will be open daylight to dusk. 
Please revisit the Ohio History Connection for more information.



Students who would like transportation from the OSU-Newark to the Octagon Earthworks must complete this form by April 7 at 5 p.m. 

We will contact you on Friday, 4/8/22 to confirm details. 
If you have questions, contact Lesha Farias at  farias.8@osu.edu.


At 2 PM Director of the Newark Earthworks Center Dr. John Low will be giving a guided tour  of the Octagon State Memorial Earthworks

Dr. Low (left in bright green) giving a tour to the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Elder's Council, 2014. Image courtesy of Timothy E. Black.
Dr. Low (left in bright green) giving a tour
to the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Elder's Council, 2014.
Image courtesy of Timothy E. Black.













And at 4 PM Artist Gerry Lang is giving a Gallery Talk: "Return from Exile: the Mixed-Blood Art of Gerry Lang" at the LeFevre Art Gallery at OSU Newark!

Gerry Lang standing in front of a blue-toned art piece. Image courtesy of the artist.
Gerry Lang is a multi-medium artist who traces the tangled journey paths between self, community and identity and the ways we can be embraced, rejected, celebrated, or dismissed based upon perception and perspective. His award winning art presents a thought provoking panorama of the artist’s own processes of challenge, discovery and resistance to labels of assumption and consumption as a mixed-blood messenger.

Newark, OH 43055

Gallery Hours: Monday - Friday, 
8 a.m. - 6 p.m.

Gerry Lang holding a turtle shell art piece. Image courtesy of the artist.
Learn more about the artist at Gerry Lang Studios.



This exhibit can be viewed during regular gallery hours throughout the spring semester. 



Sponsored by the Ohio State University Newark Earthworks Center and made possible by a grant from the Global Arts + Humanities Discovery Theme at the Ohio State University.