Monday, April 6, 2015

Astronomic Alignments at Aztalan

Map of Aztalan published in 1855 by Increase A. Lapham (1855:Plate XXXIV). Note that Lapham oriented the map so that north is facing to the right. Image Courtesy of The Ancient Earthworks Project Blog.
Map of Aztalan published in 1855 by Increase A. Lapham (1855:Plate XXXIV).
Note that Lapham oriented the map so that north is facing to the right.
Image Courtesy of The Ancient Earthworks Project Blog.
March , 18, 2015.
Dr. Bill Romain, of The Ancient Earthworks Project Blog, has written a brief reflective post about the astronomical alignments of Aztalan, a 20 acre Mississippian village site which is the northernmost known outpost of Mississippian culture and flourished around A.D. 1100.

"What makes Aztalan special to me is how everything at Aztalan is entangled and connected in a relational web involving earth, sun, moon, mounds, and people - living and dead. Special people lived on special mounds, dead people were buried within. The Aztalan mounds were of the earth, but at the same time, through their alignments, they connected to the sun and moon and cosmic cycles. The past was linked to the Aztalan present though the incorporation of older mounds into the design of a Mississippian town. In these things, everything was inter-related; everything was connected."

To read the full postclick here.

For more information,
Visit:
  • Azatalan State Park
    • Wisconsin State Park System
  • Azatalan Collection
    • Milwaukee Public Museum
      • Middle Mississippians
      • Wisconsin Outpost
      • Site History
      • The Collection
      • Princess Burial
      • Azatalan Today
      • Resources
  • Medieval Mississippians: The Cahokian World
    • Timothy R. Pauketat and Susan M. Alt, School for Advanced Research, 2015.
  • Telfer Mounds (Wisconsin)
    • Archaeological Conservancy
  • Indian Mound Sites of Wisconsin
    • Robert A. Birmingham and Leslie E. Eisenberg, University of Wisconsin Press, 2000.
    • Project Muse*
*Link provided requires a sign in to Project Muse
Ohio State University students can use their student log-in to access the database
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