Wednesday, April 8, 2015

Celestial Timekeeping

View of the fall equinox sunrise from the reconstructed Woodhenge sun calendar at Cahokia Mounds. Image Courtesy of William R. Iseminger and the Archaeological Conservancy.
View of the fall equinox sunrise from the reconstructed
 Woodhenge sun calendar at Cahokia Mounds.
 Image Courtesy of William R. Iseminger and the Archaeological Conservancy.
Spring 2015.
David Malakoff, of American Archaeology, has written a detailed overarching article
about the importance, frequency, and variety in celestial timekeeping
within ancient Central and North America.

"In recent decades, researchers have identified numerous sites in Central and North America where buildings, mounds, ceremonial spaces, and pathways line up with solstice and equinox sunrises, as well as other key movements of the moon, planets, and stars. The sites, some of which are 5,000 years old, are giving scholars a clearer picture of just how extensively prehistoric Americans may have used celestially-oriented art and architecture to gauge the movement of time."

To read the full article, subscription to American Archaeology is required.
Additional photos relating to the issue can be found here.

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