Wednesday, May 13, 2015

Mackosi’kwe’s Baskets: Marking Relationships & Potato Stamps and Ash Splints

Mackosi’kwe (Mrs. Michel Buckshot,. Photo taken by Frank Speck. Mss. Ms. Coll. 126, Image 1-2-b. American Philosophical Society Digital Collections. Image Courtesy of Penn Museum Blog.
Mackosi’kwe (Mrs. Michel Buckshot,. Photo taken by Frank Speck.
Mss. Ms. Coll. 126, Image 1-2-b. American Philosophical Society Digital Collections.
 Image Courtesy of Penn Museum Blog.
April, 24, 2015.
Margaret Bruchac, of the Penn Museum Blog, has written a detailed and informative post about the Penn Museum's collection of dye stamps and ash splints created by Mackosi’kwe, of the River Desert Algonquian Band at the Maniwaki Reserve; now known as the Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg.

"The items in the River Desert collection have been described as “common” and “utilitarian,” but they are much more. The objects created by Mackosi’kwe and other Algonquin artisans express Indigenous technology, ecological adaptability, and local aesthetics, woven into every piece of raw material, every stitch, every mark. "

To read the full postclick here.

May 5, 2015.
Elizabeth Peng, of the Penn Museum Blog, has written a follow-up post about the Penn Museum's collection of dye stamps and ash splints created by Mrs. Michel Buckshot, of the River Desert Algonquian Band at the Maniwaki Reserve; now known as the Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg.

"During the 1920s, a collection of potato die stamps illustrating the process of stamping baskets, along with the corresponding stamped ash splints, entered Johnson’s possession. He commissioned Mrs. Buckshot to create these potato die stamps, in order to show the traditional use of vegetable stamps and herbal dyes to decorate ash splint baskets. The dies, which are now preserved (likely in alcohol) inside a glass jar, consist of chunks of potatoes onto which various shapes have been carved, such as leaves and other organic shapes. Even today there are remnants of colored pigment on at least one of the stamp surfaces. "

To read the full postclick here.

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