Wednesday, December 23, 2015

Before Maize, Relative of Quinoa Fed Ohio Valley 3,000 Years Ago

The chenopod harvest at the Plant Biology Learning Garden. Image Courtesy of Ohio University.
The chenopod harvest at the Plant Biology Learning Garden.
Image Courtesy of Ohio University.
December 7, 2015.
Cameron Fortin, of Ohio University, has written an informative press release about pitseed goosefoot, a related plant to quinoa, and its role in feeding Ohio Valley residents more than 3,000 years ago; along with its potential for the future.

"For the indigenous populations who once inhabited the Ohio River Valley, this plant was an essential food resource. Chenopods were one of the key components of what is known as the Eastern Agricultural Complex, the original suite of plants domesticated before the introduction of maize to the region. Archaeological data suggests that the dispersed populations of small-scale horticulturalists who built the large earthworks, which have come to symbolize these cultures, were sustained by EAC species, including the nutrient rich chenopods."


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