Monday, February 29, 2016

3D Scans of Inka Stonework- Live Online

Jon Blundell, a 3D digitization specialist at the Smithsonian, capturing 3D data points of the Inka archaeological site at Pisac, Peru, 2014. Image Courtesy of Samy Chiclla and the National Museum of the American Indian's Blog.
Jon Blundell, a 3D digitization specialist at the Smithsonian, capturing 3D data points of the Inka archaeological site at Pisac, Peru, 2014. Image Courtesy of Samy Chiclla and the National Museum of the American Indian's Blog.
February 10, 2016.
National Museum of the American Indian Blog has written a behind-the-scenes post about the Smithsonian 3D digitization team's efforts to digitize examples of Inka architecture in Cuzco, Peru.

"To create these models, Smithsonian 3D digitization specialist Jon Blundell joined the museum’s Inka Road project team in Cusco during the summer of 2014. Dr. Ramiro Matos (Quechua), an Andean archaeologist and co-curator of The Great Inka Road, and consulting scholars and other museum specialists on the project team worked with Jon to identify sites around the city for 3D imaging. This was the museum’s first use of 3D scanning technology. “Identifying sites was collaborative,” Jon says. “The team knew that 3D scanning was a tool they wanted to deploy to tell the story. It was interesting to work with them to figure out, What is here that would be compelling as a 3D model, could be captured in the time we have, and has a story behind it?” "

To read the full postclick here.

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