Friday, July 24, 2015

Basketmakers' tradition of storing black ash logs in water effective in killing EAB

Tina Ciaramitaro, USDA Forest Service Technician, and Tom Baweja, USDA Forest Service Biological Aide, toss logs into the Red Cedar River near Okemos, Michigan. Image Courtesy of Phys.org.
Tina Ciaramitaro, USDA Forest Service Technician, and Tom Baweja,
USDA Forest Service Biological Aide,  toss logs into the Red Cedar River
 near Okemos, Michigan.  Image Courtesy of Phys.org.
July, 17, 2015.
Phys.org, has written an interesting article about a partnership between artisans from the Match-e-be-nash-she-wish Band of Potawatomi Indians, the USDA Forest Service, and the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service in testing the traditional practice of submerging black ash logs against the emerald ash borer (EAB) and its larvae with the goal of
preserving the wood for future basketmaking.

"Black ash has been prized for centuries by traditional basketmakers for its ring-porous wood, which allows layers of xylem - the cells and vessels that transport water up a tree and creates tree rings - to be easily separated. The loss of black ash to the emerald ash borer has sparked concern about preserving black ash for use in basketmaking as well as the potential for spreading EAB by transporting untreated logs from forests to locations where they are pounded and split and ultimately used for basketmaking."

To read the full articleclick here.

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