Thursday, February 18, 2016

'Bring Them Home': Rosebud Sioux Seeking Return of Relatives Buried at Carlisle Indian Industrial School

From 1879 until 1918, more than 10,000 Native American children from 140 tribes attended Carlisle.  Only 158 graduated. (c.1900).  Image Courtesy of Frontier Forts, Wikipedia and Indian Country Today.
From 1879 until 1918, more than 10,000 Native American children from 140 tribes attended Carlisle.
Only 158 graduated. (c.1900).
Image Courtesy of Frontier Forts, Wikipedia and Indian Country Today.
February 8, 2016.
Rick Kearns, of Indian Country Today, has written an informative article about the efforts of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe to bring home the remains of several Lakota children buried at Carlisle Indian Industrial School. Carlisle Indian Industrial School was used as a model for the federal policy of forced assimilation; developed with the goal of eradicating American Indian cultures. The Self-Determination and Educational Assistance Act of 1975 recognized American Indian nations' right to 'plan, conduct, and administer programs and services [affecting them]'(Page 2). Today, only a few boarding schools are still in operation.

"Last month, Soldier Wolf wrote a letter to LTC Greg W. Ank, Garrison Commander of Carlisle, saying that, “Our ancestors should not be a tourist attraction. Our ancestors are no longer considered objects of research; they will no longer be considered roadside attractions. These children were people; they were sons, daughters, nieces, nephews, future war chiefs, future mothers, grandmothers, grandfathers, and caretakers of this land. For them to be taken away and never given back is appalling.” "

To read the full articleclick here.

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