Tuesday, March 15, 2016

Fort Recovery Research, Ball State University

Ball State University Applied Anthropology Laboratories

"The Applied Anthropology Laboratories has been awarded numerous research grants to conduct archaeological investigations, assist with preservation planning, and promote community awareness of the history and significance of the Battle of the Wabash (1791) and the Battle of Fort Recovery (1794), two historically significant battles of the Northwest Indian Wars. This research page serves as a clearinghouse for our current research and as a way for the public to learn more about these two battles that took place in modern day Fort Recovery, Ohio."

History and Significance of the 
Battle of the Wabash and the Battle of Fort Recovery

List of Sources
"Many of these resources are on-line or readily available. Click on a topic... for an associated bibliography and links when available."

  • American Revolution Era
  • Anthony Wayne
  • Arthur St. Clair
  • Battle of Fallen Timbers 1794
  • Battle of Fort Recovery 1794
  • Battle of the Wabash 1791
  • Battlefield and Contemporary Artifacts
  • Diaries from the Battle of Fort Recovery
  • Diaries from the Battle of the Wabash
  • Fort Jefferson
  • Guns and Armament
  • Late 18th and Early 19th Century U.S. Military
  • Maps
  • Mishikinakwa (Little Turtle)
  • Native American Alliance
  • Native American Battlefield Tactics
  • Weyapiersenwah (Blue Jacket)

Current Tribal Information

"At the Battle of the Wabash in 1791, St. Clair and his American army were confronted by a large alliance of Native Americans, led by Weyapiersenwa (Blue Jacket of the Shawnee) and Mishikinakwa (Little Turtle of the Miami). This force was comprised of seasoned, volunteer warriors from nine different Native American tribes and from other smaller Native American groups. The major tribes in the Battle of the Wabash were the Wyandots, Mingo, Cherokee, Ojibwe, Ottawa, Potawatomi, Shawnee, Delaware, and Miami. Together these nine tribes accounted for the estimated 1,400 warriors on the day of battle.

The Native American alliance was ultimately able to surround, attack, and defeat the American force led by St. Clair in less than three hours..... "
AAL Research at Fort Recovery

  • The Battles of Fort Recovery: Archaeology and Site Identification
  • Fort Recovery Documentary and Public Archaeology Volume
  • Battle of the Wabash 1791: Native American Battle Strategies
  • The Battles of Fort Recovery: National Register Nomination
  • The Battle of the Wabash and the Battle of Fort Recovery
  • The Battles of Fort Recovery: Preservation Planning
  • The Battles of Fort Recovery: Additional Archaeology
  • Battles of the Wabash and Fort Recovery: Sign Development and Design
  • The Battles of Fort Recovery: Wayside Exhibits Planning and Design
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