Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Forest Reveal Lingering Effects of Native Cultures

Honey locust with pods.  Image Courtesy of Robert J. Warren II and ScienceDaily.
Honey locust with pods.
Image Courtesy of Robert J. Warren II and ScienceDaily.
March 16, 2016.
SUNY Buffalo State, of Science Daily, wrote an exploratory article about the recent research of Robert J. Warren who argues that the distribution of Honey Locust trees (Gleditsia triacanthos) throughout the southern Appalachian Mountain region in the United States can best be explained by ancient cultivation practices of the Cherokee.

"He points out that the Cherokee had reason to cultivate the honey locust as a source of sugar, and as wood for game sticks and weapons. The tree also had spiritual significance. He conducted extensive searches for honey locust trees and then used sources including military maps, historical accounts, archeological research, and historical markers to identify Cherokee settlement sites. He verified the information with sources including the Eastern Band of the Cherokee Nation (EBCI) Tribal Historic Preservation Office. His results strongly suggest that G. triacanthos distribution in the Southern Appalachian region are more strongly patterned by Native American settlements than by niche requirements or alternative methods of seed dispersal."

To read the full articleclick here.

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